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Slow Grinder Problems

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Forum topic by kdavid posted 01-24-2011 02:29 PM 1083 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kdavid

21 posts in 2489 days


01-24-2011 02:29 PM

Morning, So, I purchased a used Lathe and it came with many tools. Of course the tools were dull, so I purchased a slow grinder. Day one I took a chip out of the wheel , it appears to be too deep to flatten to make it flat again. Can I still use it safely in it’s condition ? Thanks for any help… Kirk

-- Kirk..... " Hope I die before I get old "


13 replies so far

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canadianchips

2362 posts in 2465 days


#1 posted 01-24-2011 02:52 PM

NO !
If it has a chip it is not going to work well for sharpening your tools. Try using a “Stone Dresser” and getting your stone back to level.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#2 posted 01-24-2011 02:52 PM

To be ultra safe, the answer would be “no”.

I think a more pragmatic way to address the issue is by seeing how much vibration the out-of-balance wheel generates. If it is very modest, I’d probably try to use it. If it is significant, “no”.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 2248 days


#3 posted 01-24-2011 02:59 PM

And stand off to the side when you test for vibration.. (but..how big a chip ?)

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

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Howie

2656 posts in 2391 days


#4 posted 01-24-2011 03:24 PM

Wheels are cheap compared to hospital bills.

-- Life is good.

View kdavid's profile

kdavid

21 posts in 2489 days


#5 posted 01-24-2011 03:58 PM

Thanks, I can see no noticeable vibration as the chip is small. I would flatten it but it’s on the side and goes down aways . I probably an 1/8 ” into the surface. Again and always thanks for your valuable feedback, time to go to woodcraft and bite the bullet….Kirk

-- Kirk..... " Hope I die before I get old "

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William

9906 posts in 2310 days


#6 posted 01-24-2011 07:12 PM

I seen with my own eyes what using a chipped grinding wheel can do. I used to do industrial mechanic work. We had a grinder with a chip out of the wheel. It was about a quarter inch square and about an eight of an inch deep. Management put a sign on it stating not to use it, that a new wheel was on order. Guess what guys. Sometimes chipped wheels are an indicator of further damage that is hard to see on a grinding wheel. One of the other mechanics decided he knew better than management. To make a long gruesome story short, he lost all of his front teeth and all of his upper lip and most of the left side of his bottom lip had to be surgically reconstructed using skin grafts.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3156 days


#7 posted 01-24-2011 08:19 PM

“I would flatten it but it’s on the side and …..” First and foremost : You’re not supposed to grind on the SIDE of a wheel !!!

Is it actually a missing chip , or did you gouge it with your tool ? If the chip flew off with no contact from you , then you should replace the wheel immediately as it is defective. Be safe , not sorry : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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fussy

980 posts in 2519 days


#8 posted 01-25-2011 02:36 AM

It’s a slow grinder so the wheel won’t explode. The only question is what effect will it have on sharpening, and if you stay away from it the answer is none. I had a divot in my wheel about 1/3 the width extending almost 1.2 the diameter and used it for 2 years on stuff as wide as the wheel. The part ofr the tool resting on the healthy part of the weel won’t let the tool catch in the divot; you’ll just feel a little click. Just watch what you’re doing and when you can, replace it.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View William's profile

William

9906 posts in 2310 days


#9 posted 01-25-2011 02:51 AM

Somehow, I missed the slow part of the slow grinder. In that case, as long as the grinder isn’t out of balance with the chip out, I’d use it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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Dusty56

11806 posts in 3156 days


#10 posted 01-25-2011 03:41 AM

If you consider one thousand seven hundred and twenty five revolutions per minute to actually be slow , then go ahead and take your chances….that’s almost 30 revolutions per second…How fast are you ?
Bet you’ll be hurtin’ before you can even say DAMN !!!

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1812 posts in 3191 days


#11 posted 01-25-2011 03:48 AM

I would say it depends on how slow is slow and how deep is deep in relation to the overall size of the wheel. Pictures would help a lot with providing a true assessment. If you can turn it slow enough to flatten it out, I would say go ahead Is the wheel attached directly to a motor shaft or is it belt driven? Directly mounted, you won’t get it slow enough to do it safely. Belt drive is a different subject. Since you say it can’t be flattened, that makes me wonder how deep it really is.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3156 days


#12 posted 01-25-2011 03:56 AM

I think he needs to clarify whether the chip is out of the side of the wheel as stated above , or on the edge of the grinding face and travels down onto the side from there. Pictures would be a great way to show this : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View TomHintz's profile

TomHintz

207 posts in 2866 days


#13 posted 01-25-2011 11:06 AM

If it is one of the 90-rpm slow-speed grinders, the chances of it coming apart bad enough to throw anything is remote to say the least. If this is one of the 1750-rpm machines, the safest thing to do is scrap the wheel.
If the chip is to the side as often happens, you can keep the remaining surface level and use that and let the natural wear bring the surface down to the level of the chip. It really depends on how big the chip is. maybe posting the type of grinder, it’s rpm and dimensions of the chip would help.

-- Tom Hintz, www.newwoodworker.com

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