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Forum topic by Slugger posted 09-10-2017 05:22 PM 600 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Slugger

4 posts in 177 days


09-10-2017 05:22 PM

I cut eight sticks to 30 inches and put a 22.5° angle on them I’m trying to make a octogon. I can not get them to meet up. What did I do wrong and how do I fix it?

-- I really hate maths


16 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1123 posts in 1579 days


#1 posted 09-10-2017 05:43 PM

Your looks to be in a rough shape.Its very hit and miss to accurately cut precise angles on rough stock.

Think about it.

-- Aj

View TSMD's profile

TSMD

3 posts in 383 days


#2 posted 09-10-2017 05:56 PM

You should check your saw & angles to make sure they are 22.5°. As Aj2 mentioned, if your boards are ‘rough’, it makes it easier to through off 1 or more angles. Try lining all the pieces up side by side to see if any are noticeably different in length/angles/crown/etc, and if so, fix it or make a replacement.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

751 posts in 1222 days


#3 posted 09-10-2017 05:56 PM

It takes a very precise mitering set-up to get a perfect octagon. A 1/4 degree error would result in a 2 3/4” gap (with 30” sides)

Fine-tune your miter cuts.

One “trick” is to assemble two half-octagons first, then you only have to adjust two joints

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116312 posts in 3358 days


#4 posted 09-10-2017 07:04 PM

Besides the possibility of the angles being slightly off the length of each section is critical also.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Loren's profile

Loren

9423 posts in 3429 days


#5 posted 09-10-2017 07:05 PM

If the edge the end cuts are referenced from
is not dead-straight, the assembly won’t go
together as planned.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4395 posts in 2132 days


#6 posted 09-10-2017 07:43 PM

Two things are critical, the angle has to be exactly 22.5° and each leg has to be exactly the same length. Your wood looks warped and crooked so getting that kind of precision is nearly impossible. That is where you went wrong.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View jbay's profile

jbay

1728 posts in 680 days


#7 posted 09-10-2017 08:58 PM

Did you do a dry fit to check your angles? This is where you went wrong. :)

And then at that you have to have a good eye to recognize how much off the angles are and how much it will affect the outcome.

If you had a strap clamp, and did a dry fit to check all of your joints (and member lengths), before gluing,
you would have caught this beforehand.

Spring clamps, tape, a ratchet strap, would have helped with the dry fit if you don’t have a strap clamp.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Slugger's profile

Slugger

4 posts in 177 days


#8 posted 09-10-2017 10:13 PM

This is the dry fit. I measured 4 times and even drew out the angles, then lined them up as I was cutting to make sure they matched. The lumber IS reclaimed wood from a train car delivery of steel, these were the spacers. The project is a deer stand to replace a damaged one on the farm. So it’s not a critical fine piece of furniture or anything but it is frustrating me. I may just have to switch to a square structure and save myself some hairline…lol

-- I really hate maths

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

16858 posts in 2787 days


#9 posted 09-10-2017 10:16 PM

Stack em all up and see whats going on. Maybe its length, maybe its angle, maybe its warp. Youll know pretty quick once ya stack em. They should all be the exact same.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9423 posts in 3429 days


#10 posted 09-10-2017 10:18 PM

While it won’t make the angles match
up perfectly, adding slots for splines on
the ends should allow the whole thing
to be dry assembled. At that point you
can glue-up and accept the gaps or try
to hunt them down and correct the angles.
The splines will provide a lot of glue strength.

View jbay's profile

jbay

1728 posts in 680 days


#11 posted 09-10-2017 10:21 PM

Put a ratchet strap around them and check it again. Just laying them together isn’t going to tell you much.
It may go together fine strapped.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Slugger's profile

Slugger

4 posts in 177 days


#12 posted 09-10-2017 10:35 PM



Stack em all up and see whats going on. Maybe its length, maybe its angle, maybe its warp. Youll know pretty quick once ya stack em. They should all be the exact same.

- chrisstef


I did that as I was cutting them and they were the same???

-- I really hate maths

View Slugger's profile

Slugger

4 posts in 177 days


#13 posted 09-10-2017 10:37 PM



Put a ratchet strap around them and check it again. Just laying them together isn t going to tell you much.
It may go together fine strapped.

- jbay


I will try this when I get a chance, I’m not scraping the project yet just need to walk away for a couple of days and come back to it.

-- I really hate maths

View josephf's profile

josephf

170 posts in 1877 days


#14 posted 09-11-2017 12:15 AM

this is very hard to do .at least for me .the saw can be very accurate yet still not do this . i have a kapex that i yet to try this with .i have been told this saw can do it . my humble opinion ,based on my limited experience this is just tuff to do .i agree with previous comments that you now need to start adjust individual joints and get close enough .the wood likely has something to do with the issue .love the spline idea,will really help when pulling it together and keeping joints tight

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10256 posts in 2161 days


#15 posted 09-11-2017 03:58 AM



I did that as I was cutting them and they were the same???
- Slugger

Then your angles are off. It doesn’t take much.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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