LumberJocks

TS/Router table extension mounted the "other" way.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by SeattleScott posted 09-09-2017 02:51 PM 596 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View SeattleScott's profile

SeattleScott

3 posts in 99 days


09-09-2017 02:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router tablesaw

Every router table extension I see mounted to a table saw has the router table mounted so that it’s fence is parallel to the TS fence. i.e. you stand at the left or right side of the table saw.

There’s 27” between my TS rails. This top (https://www.woodpeck.com/rt2432phen.html) is 27” deep.

Is there a reason that people don’t install these on RH side of the TS and work from the same side of the table as when sawing?

Ergonomics? Operations? Mounting difficulty?

I’ve been unsuccessful in finding anyone trying this. I get that it means I would have to remove the TS or RT fence more often, but I would get a much longer and deeper router table. I’m 6’2” so I don’t anticipate a reach issue.


9 replies so far

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

688 posts in 655 days


#1 posted 09-10-2017 12:52 AM

The table saw fence becomes the router fence in most designs. It seems to me it would be very difficult to build a router table fence that moves perpendicular to the table saw fence. I don’t like the idea of mounting a router table in a table saw anyway. The setups often interfere with each other and I don’t like changing setups all the time. The mounting strategy you are proposing would make simultaneous use of both tools difficult if not impossible. If you must make your table saw into a router table as well due to space limitations, at least make it so you can use both at least in some situations.

There is a possibility that I am misunderstanding your intentions. If true then disregard my comments.

View shipwright's profile (online now)

shipwright

7781 posts in 2636 days


#2 posted 09-10-2017 01:18 AM

The whole reason for mounting a router lift in a tablesaw is to make use of the precision fence system you have already paid for. I have no problem with the two interfering with each other. The router bit drops below the table surface with a few cranks.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

368 posts in 1507 days


#3 posted 09-10-2017 04:52 AM

Scott, I thought the same way and didn’t want to work from the side with my router table. I mounted my router table in my saw in the “so called” reverse position. I have the Incra fence and I just flip the fence around to use the router. It only takes a minute and the beauty of the Incra system is the fence stays in perfect alignment. Here are a coujple of shots of my setup.

In normal TS position

In Router mode

-- Earl

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

688 posts in 655 days


#4 posted 09-11-2017 02:11 AM

Your table saw fence accommodates a very wide spacing between the saw blade and the router bit. Imagine you were using a table saw with only 30” rip capacity. That is a very common specification. If that were the case then interference between the two tools could happen more often. Your fence setup is quite nice (I am Jealous) but it takes up more room than my table saw and stand alone router table combined. Space considerations are why most people say they mounted a router in their table saw table.

By the way, what it the changeover time of the fence between table saw and router modes? It seems it would be time consuming but I could very well be wrong.

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

368 posts in 1507 days


#5 posted 09-11-2017 03:57 AM

It really doesn’t take up that much space. Believe me, space is at a premium in my shop. These are the standard Incra 32 inch rails and the router table is only about 3 inches longer than the wood Jet piece that goes with the stock rails. I have the Incra Wonder fence setup, which isn’t shown in the pics and it all slides onto the Incra fence, makes routing almost fun.

-- Earl

View SeattleScott's profile

SeattleScott

3 posts in 99 days


#6 posted 09-11-2017 05:57 AM



The table saw fence becomes the router fence in most designs. It seems to me it would be very difficult to build a router table fence that moves perpendicular to the table saw fence. I don t like the idea of mounting a router table in a table saw anyway. The setups often interfere with each other and I don t like changing setups all the time. The mounting strategy you are proposing would make simultaneous use of both tools difficult if not impossible. If you must make your table saw into a router table as well due to space limitations, at least make it so you can use both at least in some situations.

There is a possibility that I am misunderstanding your intentions. If true then disregard my comments.

- ArtMann


ArtMann,

The table I linked to has fence guides in it, which would be perpendicular to the TS fence, so I don’t really need to worry about that. True that probably doesn’t make for the “precision” fence system many strive for; perhaps I’m not experienced enough yet to appreciate that sufficiently.

Since I only have two hands, using both simultaneously, I think would be difficult. :)

In the situation where I wanted to go back and forth between the TS and router and so have both fences mounted, would my rip capacity reduced to <18” really limit me? How often do you go between ripping wide boards and using the router table?

I’m guessing I’m more likely to be working with a cross-cut sled alternately with the router instead of the TS fence.


The whole reason for mounting a router lift in a tablesaw is to make use of the precision fence system you have already paid for.
[snip]
- shipwright

shipwright,

Actully, that’s not the reason I was looking to mount the router table in my table saw. It’s purely for how many things I have in my garage/shop and how clear the space needs to be to the right of my TS.

No one out there that’s done this and found they do/don’t like it?

View jonah's profile

jonah

1471 posts in 3137 days


#7 posted 09-11-2017 09:24 AM

If you need things to be clear to the right of your table saw, why would you put a 43” wide router table top to the right of your saw instead of something ~18-24” wide like a normal top?

View SeattleScott's profile

SeattleScott

3 posts in 99 days


#8 posted 09-11-2017 04:31 PM



Scott, I thought the same way and didn t want to work from the side with my router table. I mounted my router table in my saw in the “so called” reverse position.

[snip]

- retfr8flyr

retfr8flyr,

Rotate your router table clockwise 90° and then it will be in the position I’m describing.


If you need things to be clear to the right of your table saw, why would you put a 43” wide router table top to the right of your saw instead of something ~18-24” wide like a normal top?

- jonah

jonah,

The 43” top would add ~7” to right side as I’d remove the existing wing (stamped steel) + extension. (SawStop contractor + 36” rails)

It’s really the difference between being able to pass by on the right and being able to work on the right. My safety training and personal sense is that you need to have plenty of clear space around where you’re working a piece of equipment.

If I’m going to work on the right I need to move my TS a lot farther to the left—2ft? I could do that but it reduces my options on the left. Because I have a work/out feed table, moving the saw left moves all that left also so the issue is larger than just the TS. It impacts space downstream of the saw, too.

-

I don’t want to sound like I’m dismissing everyone’s feedback. It makes me think more about the issues. I’m really hoping someone reads this who has or tried this configuration. Anyone?

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

688 posts in 655 days


#9 posted 09-11-2017 06:26 PM

There is another reason why I wouldn’t mount a router table “cross-ways” in my table saw. I use a crosscut sled when precision really matters. A router fence that extends that far toward the table saw blade would have to be completely removed every time I wanted to do a crosscut.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com