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Only marginally woodworking related: Simulated woodcarving toy from the 1970s?

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Forum topic by JJohnston posted 01-23-2011 06:12 PM 959 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JJohnston

1614 posts in 2751 days


01-23-2011 06:12 PM

Does anybody else remember this? It was fake woodcarving. It consisted of a rough piece of “wood”, like a small branch with the bark still on it; buried inside was a hard plastic “finished piece”, which was surrounded by the “waste wood”, which was soft plastic, or clay, or something else that could be carved away with a dull knife. It was one-time use (the carving part at least). There were 2 or 3 choices of finished piece; the one I remember was an alligator or crocodile. The “branch” for this one would have been mostly straight, with 4 smaller branch nubs sticking out for the legs.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln


6 replies so far

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CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3678 days


#1 posted 01-23-2011 09:07 PM

Hmmm, I don’t remember that. But I DO remember a small toy lathe where you turned blanks made out of a sort of styrofoam.

http://cgi.ebay.com/1960s-Vintage-Mattel-Real-Power-Shop-Nearly-Complete-/110638382914?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19c28fbf42#ht_1133wt_905

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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JJohnston

1614 posts in 2751 days


#2 posted 01-24-2011 03:03 AM

No, this wasn’t the “power shop”. That’s all I get when I try to Google what I’m looking for. :-(

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

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William

9906 posts in 2302 days


#3 posted 01-24-2011 04:07 AM

I grew up in the 70s. However, we were poor and my parents would have never bought anything like that. For most of my childhood, our nicest toys were blocks of wood with mason jar lids for wheels. By the time my brother and I were about six or seven we’d “steal” my grandfather’s old timer knife (he secretly knew we had it, ot we’d have gotten a belt on our butts), and whittle the blocks down to look more like cars and trucks. So I guess we had a similar toy, except it came out of my grandfather’s shop, not the store.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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JJohnston

1614 posts in 2751 days


#4 posted 01-24-2011 05:31 PM

Well, I’m really very sorry you were poor, but you could simply have said no, I’m not familiar with that one.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

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William

9906 posts in 2302 days


#5 posted 01-24-2011 06:48 PM

I deeply apologize if I offended you by chiming in with something only midly related. My post wasn’t a gripe about having grown up poor. I just found it interesting that something like that was sold commercially when we did something very similar, just with real wood and a knife. I find little tidbits like this interesting. Around the same time my brother and I found whittling wood interesting as kids, stores must have seen a customer potential for something like that with similarities.
Again, I apologize if I offended you, as it sounds I did.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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JJohnston

1614 posts in 2751 days


#6 posted 01-24-2011 06:57 PM

No, I apologize for snapping.

We were middle class, but not rich. I never had one of these, it’s just one of those classic toys that I remember, but I can’t remember the name. I’d like to find one today, just for the heck of it. My research has found that it was the second of its type; the first one was “sculpting” with a fake block of marble and a hammer and chisel.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

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