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waterlox for dining table?

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Forum topic by stevo_wis posted 09-08-2017 04:28 AM 475 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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stevo_wis

127 posts in 2866 days


09-08-2017 04:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: waterlox

Hi Folks,
I am just putting finish on a red oak table and have loved waterlox in the past. my question is whether it can hold up to wet glasses etc. I plan on applying at least 5 coats.
My last experience with polyurethane was frustrating.

I would appreciate any input. thanks,

-- Stevo


13 replies so far

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#1 posted 09-08-2017 04:44 AM

Yes, for sure. I don’t like the high sheen of the Waterlox Finish/Sealer so I top it off with their satin urethane, but I used it on a bathroom vanity countertop and it’s durable and water just beads up. I did three coats of each. I also prefer to wipe it, but that might not be practical for a large surface.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2652 days


#2 posted 09-08-2017 02:39 PM

I’m not much of a fan of polyurethane either. I always use pre-cat lacquer on my dining and coffee tables. After years of daily use, I see no signs of failure. Actually besides the occasional ding in the wood, the finish looks like new.

How’s that for not answering your question? I’m not sure about the durability of Waterlox on a table.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Notw

597 posts in 1592 days


#3 posted 09-08-2017 02:56 PM

I’ve had Waterlox on my dining room table for over a year with no issues to liquid, I did get a very slight (i’m picky) bit of hazing from a hot plate being sat on it. Other than that it looks as good now as it did the day I brought it in

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Gilley23

390 posts in 220 days


#4 posted 09-08-2017 03:51 PM

How long did you guys wait between coats of the waterlox , and how long did you wait before the final coat was cured enough to where you could put it to normal use?

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Gilley23

390 posts in 220 days


#5 posted 09-08-2017 03:53 PM

Also who carries it at the best price ? Ill have to have it shipped to me.

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builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 779 days


#6 posted 09-08-2017 04:15 PM

Waterlox Original is a satin sheen. Should be fine for a dining table.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#7 posted 09-08-2017 04:17 PM

Gilley, the Waterlox Original Sealer/Finish can says to wait 24 hours between coats. The urethane says to wait 6 to 8 hours between coats and that it’s ready for traffic in 48. I usually do a scratch test with a fingernail on an area that is hidden to feel how hard the surface it.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#8 posted 09-08-2017 04:22 PM



Waterlox Original is a satin sheen. Should be fine for a dining table.

- builtinbkyn

No, Original goes on at about a 75 sheen — quite glossy. They say it fades to a 50 sheen or so after a few months which is definitely still not in the satin range. They do make a satin Original, but it’s a finish, not a sealer, so you still need to use the finish/sealer as a base. I have not used the satin Original. I decided to go with their satin urethane since I felt it would be a tougher, more durable surface.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 779 days


#9 posted 09-08-2017 04:55 PM

Waterlox Original is a satin sheen. Should be fine for a dining table.

- builtinbkyn

They do make a satin Original, but …...

- RichTaylor

That is what I was referring to. The OP may be interested in this side by side comparison.


View on YouTube

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#10 posted 09-08-2017 05:52 PM


They do make a satin Original, but …...

- RichTaylor
That is what I was referring to. The OP may be interested in this side by side comparison.

- builtinbkyn

You left out the key element of my post. The satin original is a finish only. If you look on their website, it says “You will also need our Waterlox Original Sealer & Finish to complete your project.”

I saw that video some time back. I didn’t like the fact that he used the original high gloss as a topcoat alone since, again, the Waterlox web site says not to. Also, keep in mind that he says his two week cure time wound up being more like two months. That’s why the original sealer/finish has gone to a medium sheen. It does not look like that after only a week or two.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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TungOil

747 posts in 333 days


#11 posted 09-08-2017 08:39 PM

I use Waterlox frequently, particularly on cherry. Since Waterlox Original was originally formulated as a floor finish, it’s pretty durable stuff. It is water resistant after it cures. As mentioned above, the initial gloss is pretty high, but it does cut back nicely after about 6 months or so. I did use it about 2 years ago on a set of red oak cabinets for my shop (no stain) and I thought the finished color was mehhh on oak. You might like it, but be sure to test it on some scraps to be sure. Also, as a wiping finish, it will NOT fill the open pore structure of oak, so keep that in mind for a table top, might not be exactly what you have in mind. here is a close up of one of the doors from that set of cabinets:

With all that said, I would not use it for a dining table top personally. Pintodeluxe is right on the money, if you have the ability to spray a pre-cat lacquer will be far more durable. If wiping is your only option, consider Arm-R-Seal instead. It is a wiping varnish, but will build a little easier than the Waterlox and is very durable after it cures fully.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Kirk650

514 posts in 587 days


#12 posted 09-08-2017 10:09 PM

I’ve used a good bit of the Waterlox since a distant cousin (pro furniture maker) told me that was what he used, and his sealer was Watco Danish Oil. It’s a cheaper way to go, he explained. So, for a while I used the Watco, but finally switched to using Minwax Antique Oil as the sealer/primer. It dries faster than the Watco. As for filling pores, Red Oak might be too much to ask, but the Waterlox filled pores quite well on some Walnut gunstocks. And recently I finished some cherry plywood with it. It took a coat of the Antique Oil and 3 rather heavy coats of Waterlox, but the surface of the wood looked and felt great. I apply it with foam brushes and tip it off with long strokes.

I am not saying that the Waterlox sealer won’t work better than the Antique Oil. I have not tried it. The Watco Danish Oil and the Antique Oil work quite well, and are Ok for my use.

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builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 779 days


#13 posted 09-08-2017 10:23 PM

I’ve done the wet sanding with Watco as a sealer to fill pores on oak. I used that method on these door panels.

The lighting is a little harsh so not the best pics to illustrate the results.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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