LumberJocks

motor

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by gary351 posted 01-23-2011 02:34 PM 949 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View gary351's profile

gary351

97 posts in 2256 days


01-23-2011 02:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Is it wrong to replace a american made ts motor with a foreign one? I need to replace a motor on my vintage table saw because the pulley shaft is bent and there is just too much vibration. Has anyone had good luck with chinese are twainese motors they are 1/2 the cost of a repair are replacement motor.

-- A poor man has poor way's


13 replies so far

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2528 days


#1 posted 01-23-2011 03:34 PM

IMO, it would only be “wrong” if you’re doing a full-on restoration, or deeply into “buy American”. Otherwise, go for it.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2940 days


#2 posted 01-23-2011 05:19 PM

I agree…if you are replacing it just to make it work, nothing wrong with using what ever motor works. If it is being restored as an antique, then you would want to stay as close to the original as possible.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View oluf's profile

oluf

260 posts in 2499 days


#3 posted 01-24-2011 06:03 AM

Before you replace the motor. Turn the shaft and find the point where it is most out of round, Mark that spot on the side of the shaft. Take a large hammer and hit the shaft hard on that side. Re-check the shaft for bend and hit it some more if you need to to get it so it spins true again. Something had to hit it to bend it, so you can bend it back. You have nothing to lose. You are going to junk it anyway. It is good therapy to hit something hard with a hammer!!

-- Nils, So. Central MI. Wood is honest.Take the effort to understand what it has to tell you before you try to change it.

View cutmantom's profile

cutmantom

389 posts in 2495 days


#4 posted 01-24-2011 06:17 AM

I bent the shaft on my lawn mower by hitting some chain hidden in the grass, whacked it with a 2 pound hammer and it fixed it, probably more luck than skill but like was said by oluf you have nothing to lose

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#5 posted 01-24-2011 09:05 AM

Watch for a UL label. Your fire insurance may be invalid.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2581 posts in 2421 days


#6 posted 01-24-2011 05:15 PM

Check the voltage and the number of hertz. American and European are different. Make sure all the spec’s match!

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2397 posts in 2343 days


#7 posted 01-24-2011 05:18 PM

If you do that, the terrorists will win. :)

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3194 days


#8 posted 01-24-2011 06:25 PM

At the Barret-Jackson auto auction this past weekend, there was a ‘61 Impala that came across the auction block with a BMW V-10 motor. The car brought in excess of $200,000…so you might be onto something there, Gary!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Loren's profile

Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#9 posted 01-24-2011 07:00 PM

I’ll bet that pully shaft can be straightened. The hammer method works
but you can also try a “breaker bar” – a length of hard pipe up to 6’ long.
Clamp the motor to a tree or something and go to work with the bar.

Since the motor has it’s own power, it’s a self-contained lathe as well. You
can run the shaft and hold a file (use a tool rest) or hard sanding block
against the shaft and remove the distortion. You’ll have a smaller shaft
if you do this. I’d try to get it as straight as possible with bending it
and then if the wobble was still there try turning it down a bit using this
method.

Do make sure, if you use a file, to keep the teeth clean and run the cut
it the correct direction.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3194 days


#10 posted 01-24-2011 07:18 PM

Loren, great idea, but I’d suggest rather than machine the shaft, why not just touch up the mounted pulley? It’s aluminum, and as long as it never moves in relation to the shaft, it can absorb the ‘touching up’ to make it run true.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Loren's profile

Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#11 posted 01-24-2011 07:30 PM

I’ve had a pulley in the past where the rim wasn’t exactly aligned
with the center. I think I may have pounded it back to relatively
true. The metal near the hub is often not very thick and it’s
often a malleable pot-metal too. The pulley itself could be bent
a little to compensate for the crooked shaft.

Heavy cast-steel pulleys are a different story.

View gary351's profile

gary351

97 posts in 2256 days


#12 posted 01-24-2011 08:04 PM

Ok thanks for the replies…I”ll try pounding the shaft back to run true. Should i remove the pulley shaft so i don’t damage the bearings? Oh by the way they are machined steel pulleys.

-- A poor man has poor way's

View mcase's profile

mcase

446 posts in 2589 days


#13 posted 01-24-2011 11:19 PM

+ 1 with Topamax on the UL label

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com