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Problem with Weird Striping on Tabletop

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Forum topic by algebrawl posted 09-07-2017 11:44 PM 324 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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algebrawl

4 posts in 51 days


09-07-2017 11:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing india ink red oak drum sander tabletop

Long time lurker, first time poster.

I’m working on my first tabletop and I’ve been pretty satisfied so far, but I just came across an issue with the top as I’m finishing it. I’m making a 60” x 30” x 2” ebonized red oak top for a coffee table. I glued it up and brought the top down to my local mill for them to run it through their 36” Lobo drum sander to get everything smooth and even. After I sanded it down to 220 with my random orbital sander and hand sanding also at 220, I started the ebonizing process with India ink. The red oak takes the India ink really well, but I’m getting some weird striping that you can only see when you look at it at the right angle. I suspect that it has to do with the top going through the drum sander because the striping is the same across all the planks.

Here are some pics:

I’m not sure what to do with this. Will it go away when I finish it with several coats of polyurethane? Do I need to do a more thorough sanding job to get rid of the striping? Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!


9 replies so far

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

671 posts in 279 days


#1 posted 09-08-2017 12:04 AM

That appears to be from the drum sander. It will not go away. If you put a long straight edge across that area can you see light under it? If I were you I’d take it back and have them re-do it.

EDIT: Alternately, how does the other side look? Is it possible you are finishing what the mill intended to be the bottom?

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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firefighterontheside

16474 posts in 1641 days


#2 posted 09-08-2017 12:16 AM

What grit did they have on their drum sander? Most likely they had no more than 80 grit. You would need to do a bunch of sanding with lower grit than 220 to get rid of the drum sander lines.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Aj2

1127 posts in 1582 days


#3 posted 09-08-2017 02:08 AM

Sure it will go away when you turn off the lights or close your eyes.:) :)

-- Aj

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algebrawl

4 posts in 51 days


#4 posted 09-08-2017 02:27 AM

The tabletop is completely smooth. I’ve used a straight edge across the entire top and there’s no leaking light under it.

I haven’t stained the other side yet so I haven’t noticed anything, but this side seemed fine until the India ink dried. The striping didn’t show up until after the stain was applied. I guess I could flip it, stain the other side, and see how it reacts, but if I have to sand again I’d rather not waste my time.


That appears to be from the drum sander. It will not go away. If you put a long straight edge across that area can you see light under it? If I were you I d take it back and have them re-do it.

EDIT: Alternately, how does the other side look? Is it possible you are finishing what the mill intended to be the bottom?

- TungOil


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algebrawl

4 posts in 51 days


#5 posted 09-08-2017 02:29 AM

They told me it was 120. I sanded 150 and then 220 with my random orbital sander and then went to 220 by hand.

What grit would you suggest going back to? Down to 80 and then gradually back up to 220? Or something else?


What grit did they have on their drum sander? Most likely they had no more than 80 grit. You would need to do a bunch of sanding with lower grit than 220 to get rid of the drum sander lines.

- firefighterontheside


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firefighterontheside

16474 posts in 1641 days


#6 posted 09-08-2017 02:51 AM

My experience has been that it’s hard to get rid of the lines that come from my drum sander. Once I get to my final thickness setting, I will run it thru several more times to help reduce the lines. I would consider sanding with 80 to remove the lines and then go thru the grits. I wouldn’t go higher than 220.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

1830 posts in 724 days


#7 posted 09-08-2017 02:56 AM

I’d bring it back to the shop you paid to have them sand it – you did pay didn’t you? – and have them redo it. Seems their operator wasn’t paying attention.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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TungOil

671 posts in 279 days


#8 posted 09-08-2017 03:00 AM

one way to check for this type of flaw before committing the time to stain the top is to wipe it with alcohol or mineral spirits. You will see most wonky sanding spots, blotch, etc.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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algebrawl

4 posts in 51 days


#9 posted 09-08-2017 04:05 AM

Thanks, everyone, for the advice. I’ll call the mill tomorrow and see if they’re willing to sand it again without any additional charges.

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