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Forum topic by SqareD posted 01-23-2011 09:56 PM 721 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SqareD

21 posts in 1337 days


01-23-2011 09:56 PM

I am in the process of converting a rocker/glider into a fixed chair with four legs. This is an overstuffed rocker, not a fine piece of wood furniture. I simply want to add fixed legs, approx 5” of a basic taper, to each corner. I am struggling with the most efficient and and sturdiest option. These chairs will get quite a bit of use in a commercial setting. I have thought of running the legs completely up the inside of the frame, approx 10” total length, or using a corner brace with a bolt similar to a table leg. Any advice you have would be appreciated.


7 replies so far

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Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1507 days


#1 posted 01-24-2011 06:15 AM

A picture would help us visualize the challenge. Sounds doable though.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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SqareD

21 posts in 1337 days


#2 posted 01-24-2011 04:29 PM

Of course it would, Lee, how short-sighted of me. Attached are the photos. My most recent conclusion is to use a 2”x2”x 7or8” stock of which 2-3” would be inside the frame leaving a 5” exposed leg. I would glue the stock to frame and run a bolt through the front and side countersinking it to allow for the tight fabric wrap. The chair frame appears to be a hardwood, 1”thick.

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SqareD

21 posts in 1337 days


#3 posted 01-24-2011 04:35 PM

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bobsmyuncle

110 posts in 1347 days


#4 posted 01-26-2011 04:21 PM

I can think of a couple of ways. Personally, I’d go with #2 as the most efficient and sturdiest. I put some legs on for a customer yesterday that had such a frame on it originally.

1. As you described, a tapered foot with an untapered part that fits up into the frame. To be sturdy, the top of the tapered part should rest against the outside frame and not just the corner block. This might involve some fancy cutting of angles and shoulders.

2. Make an inside frame of plywood or hardwood, roughly 1×4. Pocket screw the inset frame to the chair’s frame all around. Use a hanger bolt and t-nut to hold the legs in place. You should probably drill and insert the t-nuts prior to attaching the legs. Likewise, position the legs so that they rest on the outside frame and not just your insert. I normally put them about 3/8-1/2” from the outside edge of the fabric. If the fabric is bunched up where it is stapled (and it looks like the padding wraps the edge), use some fender washers or spacers made from a hole saw to shim the leg out enough so it fits level.

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Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1507 days


#5 posted 01-26-2011 06:22 PM

Thanks for the photo. This could be a fun project involving some hand work and the intuitive side of your mind.

My inclination, for the best possible result, is to replace the corner block with the leg. I’d remove one corner block at a time. I’d reduce the dimension of the leg 1/4 on the two outside surfaces so the skirt rests on that shoulder. I’d hand dress it to get a good fit and glue it in there with polyurethane glue, paying close attention to square and true in the clamping process.

To be ultra certain all is well, one could add new corner blocks (which would be a little longer than the old ones).

Will you be needing stretchers between the legs do you think? That would make it even MORE fun!

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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SqareD

21 posts in 1337 days


#6 posted 01-26-2011 09:12 PM

Great feedback. I was considering and probably would have ended up with the shoulder cut but I am pleased both bobsmyuncle and Lee Barker confirmed that is the way to go.
Bobsmyuncle – re: your #2 option, are you suggesting that the new leg would be inserted against the frame with the existing fabric and stuffing in place? That is the other thing I have been wrestling with is how to bring all that fabric and padding back into line after the leg is in place. Clearly you can see this is a job for a furniture professional and I am trying to do my best.

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bobsmyuncle

110 posts in 1347 days


#7 posted 01-28-2011 03:24 AM

Built-in legs are usually built as part of the frame, stained and finishes (generally a toner), then upholstered around. Bolt-on or screwed on legs are usually added after upholstering. If they use a hanger bolt or just long screws through the base of the foot, these are added after the dust cover is on. I prep new furniture several times a week. many times the feet are detached and sitting in a box on top or inside the piece. A few times, I’ve seen a few that were bolted onto the frame,then the dust cover is added around them.

If you remove the corner blocks and replace them with the foot shaft, realize that it may not be 90 degrees at the corners if the base is tapered.

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