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Spraying Dye Stain

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Forum topic by JSMorgan posted 09-05-2017 01:17 AM 304 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JSMorgan

29 posts in 116 days


09-05-2017 01:17 AM

I am working on a dining room table and have some issues and would like some help. 1. The wood is cherry (but looks like it may be “curly cherry) as there are “rings” going all the way through the wood. I could tell those rings would pop out under a top coat so I used CN’s blotch control. This helped with blotching. 2. I sprayed (2 coats) of GF Spray Dye (water borne) and for the most part it looked ok. However, there were some run marks on the last side. I thought they would come out once another coat was sprayed but it didn’t. Was I too heavy with the spray? I finally applied another coat and wiped it this time. Still have the same run marks. 3. One more thing. If Shellac is alcohol base and it is applied (thinned) before a water base dye, with the dye still soak in? I’ve read different opinions on this and would like a definite answer, if there is one.
Thanks for any response!!


6 replies so far

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TungOil

747 posts in 333 days


#1 posted 09-05-2017 04:04 AM

when I spray dye stains I have the gun in one hand and blue shop paper towels in the other- I always wipe it out. Be sure to keep a wet edge going if possible.

I can’t definitively answer your shellac question, since I use it only rarely, but when I’ve used a 1 lb cut it seems to mostly disappear after a light application. some folks use it to minimize blotching particularly in maple. You could experiment on some scraps, be sure to use a dewaxed shellac like Zinsser Sealcoat if you intend to use a water borne top coat after.

but I’m curious why you want to subdue the curl in the cherry?

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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CharlesNeil

2144 posts in 3709 days


#2 posted 09-05-2017 01:50 PM

This may help https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgFzzZd0JVI

the best thing you can do now is to wipe it down with some water and a light scuff sand to get as much of the runs out then gently wipe some more dy on the area, remember dyes are strong and one coat does one thing 2 another, so you want to just do the area to blend, if its and edge , redo the entire edge , spot touching up dyes an be difficult. the best way is to turn you fluid volume way down as well as the spray pattern, your trying emulate a air brush and just lightly dust dye on the lighter area .

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JSMorgan

29 posts in 116 days


#3 posted 09-05-2017 03:47 PM

Thank you both for your comments! I’ll answer the easy reply first. As for the curl, it just did not look right on some scrap pieces. Looked much better after CN’s blotch control. This will really get a but why?? I am dying it black, per my wife’s wants.

I tried sanding and applying more dye but it would not cover the runs, they were too deep I guess. So, I had some “wood stain” and applied it over the dye and it covered it. It looks much better now and the runs are covered.

I plan on lacquer as my top coat. Should I apply a lite coat of shellac first? Any suggestions would be helpful.

Jerry

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CharlesNeil

2144 posts in 3709 days


#4 posted 09-05-2017 03:58 PM

no need for the shellac, roll on.. glad it worked out

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JSMorgan

29 posts in 116 days


#5 posted 09-05-2017 04:11 PM

Well, we shall see. It is not as good as I would have liked but it is just the legs and apron which the legs will be bumped into anyway.

BTW Mr. Neil, I really like the Blotch Control I purchased from you along with your book.

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CharlesNeil

2144 posts in 3709 days


#6 posted 09-05-2017 04:16 PM

BTW.. once yo have the first coat of finish on, give it a light scuff sand with some 320 , then dye it again by hand using the same dye, this is called glazing ( color over a finish) and will deepen and enrich the color, will also help to even it out some, just be sure to let the dye dry well before spraying

and as in the video , wipe it on then off but do let it sit a min, its not going to be absorbed as if it were raw wood, so it can sit just a little so it kinda adheres to the lacquer …

Glad you liked our products.. Thanks

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