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Forum topic by Demonic posted 09-03-2017 11:19 PM 287 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Demonic

3 posts in 49 days


09-03-2017 11:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: waterlox live edge walnut

Hey guys,

I’ve numbered my main questions below so they don’t get as easily lost. So to start I’m not a wood worker. I’m just a guy who after having done some minor projects decided I wanted to try to make my own live edge walnut coffee table. I bought the slab 3 years ago, but was living in the center of Boston and had no place to work. The slab was kiln dried when I bought it, and then stood inside my apartment for the past 3 years. Now that I’m outside the city and have a driveway again I’d like to finish it. I stripped the bark with a bark stripping knife and did a rough sanding of the edges with a random orbital back when I got it. The slab was planed as I received it, but one side, which I believe may be the better looking grained side, has two shallow gouges from the planer.

The slab:

Deep crevice on the side from in-grown bark (is there a woodworking term for this? a burl?)

After sanding the edges more, and showing the other side. I think this may be the better looking side for the top, but this is the side with the two planer marks, one of which I show below. Having this side up also helps hide the burl groove underneath.

Since they’re noticeable enough to feel I don’t know if they may be too deep to take out with a belt sander without affecting the flatness of the surface. I don’t have a router sled.

1. So should I take the slab to a wood shop with a large drum sander to have the whole top sanded to remove the two planing gouges?

I’m going for a modern style (not rustic, and no plastic bar-top look). I’m after a soft satin finish that makes you want to run your hands over it. This is exactly the look I’d like (taken from Devos Woodworking site):

My plan was to first use pigmented West Systems epoxy to fill the voids/cracks. I’m a bit torn between then using Glaze Coat epoxy as the final finish, as Charles Neil instructed this user to in this thread (http://lumberjocks.com/topics/58398), or using coats of Waterlox, which was what was used on the slab above from the Devos site. I believe I like the look of the Waterlox more, since even when the sheen of the epoxy is knocked down the live edge still looks a bit too plastic for me on that epoxy finish. I know I’m being picky for an amateur here.

2. If I go with the Waterlox, how would I best prepare that burl edge? Significantly sand it all down more so I can coat it in epoxy first?

3. I’ve read that prior to filling the grooves with epoxy, it can help to do one coat of finish to help prevent the epoxy from bleeding into the finer details of the wood. Thoughts?

4.I was under the impression that epoxy finishes should only be coated in water-based finishes. However, I’ve seen projects done by professionals using epoxy filler in cracks followed by oil based finishes for the wood, saying you just need to scuff up the epoxy to create a micro-mechanical bond instead of a chemical one. Is this the case?

Any other thoughts or advice?

Thanks all in advance!


5 replies so far

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builtinbkyn

1830 posts in 723 days


#1 posted 09-03-2017 11:27 PM

Why do you feel you can’t clean it up with your ROS?

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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Demonic

3 posts in 49 days


#2 posted 09-04-2017 12:42 AM

The burl groove is an inch deep in spots, so I figured that’d be quite a bit of wood to remove with a ROS. I’m assuming you were referring to that part. As for the planer gouges I looked at them more closely and could likely get away with using the belt sander for that. I was just worried about creating too much dishing in those areas.

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builtinbkyn

1830 posts in 723 days


#3 posted 09-04-2017 01:00 AM



The burl groove is an inch deep in spots, so I figured that d be quite a bit of wood to remove with a ROS. I m assuming you were referring to that part. As for the planer gouges I looked at them more closely and could likely get away with using the belt sander for that. I was just worried about creating too much dishing in those areas.

- Demonic


No it was in reference to the milling marks. They don’t appear to be that deep. The ROS should be fine for removing them and staying in plane on the remainder of the piece. I wouldn’t touch it with the belt sander. That can only cause more issues if you’re not careful. The burl occlusion can either be filled or just finished over.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

26309 posts in 2120 days


#4 posted 09-04-2017 02:33 AM

Welcome to Lumberjocks

I put a couple coats of finish on before epoxy.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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Demonic

3 posts in 49 days


#5 posted 09-04-2017 11:18 AM

Thanks guys. Any comments on which side to use for the top?

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