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Suggestions on fixing plywood side

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Forum topic by BB1 posted 09-02-2017 08:08 PM 410 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BB1

780 posts in 630 days


09-02-2017 08:08 PM

I am continuing to work on a mudroom laundry hamper holder. I have the box completed and have gotten my plywood edging on the front and back glued in place. At some point (apparently) I tore the bottom of one side of the plywood. I do plan to paint this portion. Is there a way to repair the tear out to create a solid surface for painting? As can be seen in the picture, it isn’t much, but would like to make it right if possible before painting. Thank you.


20 replies so far

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7709 posts in 1788 days


#1 posted 09-02-2017 08:15 PM

Since you’re gonna paint, just use wood filler (putty) and sand smooth

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

488 posts in 690 days


#2 posted 09-02-2017 08:18 PM

If not spackle/joint compound, perhaps a thin strip of trim. It’ll hide the imperfection and possibly prevent it from happening again.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

843 posts in 1734 days


#3 posted 09-02-2017 08:23 PM

Agree that wood filler should do the job. Timbermate is a great product.

I doubt that the damage is from tear out on the table saw. You would have noticed that I am certain. I bet you dragged the box across the bench or shop floor. I have seen that cause the veneer to catch and tear out somewhat, although not quite as badly as yours.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2751 posts in 494 days


#4 posted 09-02-2017 08:29 PM

BONDO :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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BB1

780 posts in 630 days


#5 posted 09-02-2017 08:40 PM

Thank you for the suggestions!


Since you re gonna paint, just use wood filler (putty) and sand smooth

- JoeinGa


Had thought of that. I just have never had good experiences with wood filler but those were situations where it would “show” rather than being under paint. That may be a good first option to try.


If not spackle/joint compound, perhaps a thin strip of trim. It ll hide the imperfection and possibly prevent it from happening again.

- Ripper70


The trim is something I had considered originally but then I did not create my top with as much overhang as I would like to fully trim the box. Still considering for just around the bottom if I can find a way for it to “fit” with the leveling feet. This is where having a fully developed plan would be helpful (I did not…sigh…the struggle of the weekend woodworker with limited experience!).


Agree that wood filler should do the job. Timbermate is a great product.

I doubt that the damage is from tear out on the table saw. You would have noticed that I am certain. I bet you dragged the box across the bench or shop floor. I have seen that cause the veneer to catch and tear out somewhat, although not quite as badly as yours.

- Kazooman

You guessed it. Pretty confident that I had all clean cuts. The box was heavy and in moving it around to assemble, I’m pretty sure I did the tearing. Lesson learned -ask for help when I need it.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

19299 posts in 2887 days


#6 posted 09-02-2017 08:44 PM

You can use a good wood filler or wood glue and fine sawdust as a putty!.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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BB1

780 posts in 630 days


#7 posted 09-02-2017 08:54 PM

You must have read my mind…”do I have any wood filler around?” I have some Tightbond Quick & Thick Multi-surface Glue which says it is paintable. Might be an option. Thankfully this is on the side that will be toward the wall so fixing the edge is more for my pride than for what others will see!


You can use a good wood filler or wood glue and fine sawdust as a putty!.

- Jim Jakosh


View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6314 posts in 3149 days


#8 posted 09-03-2017 04:57 PM

A little late note!
If you use Timbermate and you are going to paint with latex paint, you will need to seal the Timbermate otherwise the latex paint will soften the filler.
Haven’t tried it but I assume that oil based paint would not soften the Timbermate!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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BB1

780 posts in 630 days


#9 posted 09-03-2017 06:02 PM

Thanks for the tip. I ran out of time yesterday to deal with the repair so not too late! I may try Tightbond glue (which I have on hand) – assuming that will be ok with any paint as it states “paintable” on the bottle.


A little late note!
If you use Timbermate and you are going to paint with latex paint, you will need to seal the Timbermate otherwise the latex paint will soften the filler.
Haven t tried it but I assume that oil based paint would not soften the Timbermate!

- oldnovice


View jbay's profile

jbay

1732 posts in 681 days


#10 posted 09-03-2017 06:06 PM

I wouldn’t mess with anything else but bondo.
It’s going to be the best bet in my opinion.
I’ve used it quit a bit under paint.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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BB1

780 posts in 630 days


#11 posted 09-03-2017 06:20 PM

Additional option -thanks!


I wouldn t mess with anything else but bondo.
It s going to be the best bet in my opinion.
I ve used it quit a bit under paint.

- jbay


BONDO :<))

- GR8HUNTER


View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10275 posts in 2162 days


#12 posted 09-03-2017 06:41 PM

Glue will shrink. Bondo is fine but messy and stinks. Spackling or drywall mud would be easiest. No smell, dries reasonably fast, cheap, sand s easily. Just don’t get the gimmicky kind with granules in it, sometimes marketed especially for repairs.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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BB1

780 posts in 630 days


#13 posted 09-03-2017 08:14 PM

Thank you for the suggestions. I looked at it some more and see the tear is right on top of a void. I think, given the depth, that I’m going to try to incorporate a thin trim strip.


Glue will shrink. Bondo is fine but messy and stinks. Spackling or drywall mud would be easiest. No smell, dries reasonably fast, cheap, sand s easily. Just don t get the gimmicky kind with granules in it, sometimes marketed especially for repairs.

- Rick M


View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6314 posts in 3149 days


#14 posted 09-04-2017 05:09 AM

Ricky M, you keep say spakling or dry wall mud!
If you ever get a chance to try Timbermate, please do as it has the same properties as spackle except for the color and the fact that dry leftovers can be reconstituted and used again. The colors can be mixed to match every wood you can think of.

As you can tell, I like Timbermate and have used it in place of the typical oil based rub your arm off fillers ever since I first tried it. I have even used it to replace some missing grout which I matched so well you can tell where the grout ends and the Timbermate begins.

I belive that the MSDS is also similar to spackle!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View theart's profile

theart

12 posts in 336 days


#15 posted 09-04-2017 03:05 PM

Is this going to be anchored to the wall? If it’s free to move around the laundry room, you’ll get more tearouts later. A trim strip or a beveled edge would be the way to go.

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