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Delta TS 36-670 motor to 220/240V?

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Forum topic by psxstudio posted 01-20-2011 11:00 PM 3554 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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psxstudio

15 posts in 2153 days


01-20-2011 11:00 PM

Hi,

Well, I finally picked up a used TS from CL and it’s in great conidition (except lot of elbow grease for cleaning up the cast iron table top free of rust). I was looking at the power cable and it has black electrical tape wrapped around in the middle. Before purchasing the TS, I had the guy run it and TS ran just fine. I’ll probably change out the cord and was wondering how to change the motor to 220/240V? Thanx.

JB


21 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2156 days


#1 posted 01-20-2011 11:09 PM

Literally change the motor or change the voltage on the existing motor? Look at the rear of the motor: there may be a shield under which a wiring diagram is located. Mine’s behind the reset switch on my vintage JET. Otherwise, the owner’s manual may be available online. It was a simple switch of some bus wires on my machine. Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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psxstudio

15 posts in 2153 days


#2 posted 01-21-2011 03:46 AM

Ahh. I did look for the manual but can’t find one for 36-670 model. I dl’ed the 36-675 manual and looking through the manual, it looks the same as 670. I didn’t see any info regarding wiring change to the motor; except: reconnect the motor leads in the motor junction box by following the instructions on the motor plate. I’ll have to look at the motor plate and see.

edit: I’ve checked the motor housing and I can’t find any information regarding the 240 change. All I can see on the motor plate is 120/240V / amperage / hp, etc… =[ There is a reset switch box on the top of the motor.

JB

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canadianchips

2350 posts in 2460 days


#3 posted 01-21-2011 04:56 AM

The plate might have a diagram saying Lo voltage and Hi voltage. For 220 you want the Hi voltage. Some real old ,motors had this diagram inside the plate where you are going to do the changes.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#4 posted 01-21-2011 06:06 AM

Open up the wire junction box on the motor…it should be easy to get to and should have a wiring schematic right on the inside that should be easy to follow.

The wire junction box should look like this one that sticks out from the side of the motor and says Baldor />

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 2655 days


#5 posted 01-21-2011 06:32 AM

The question you really need to ask yourself is “why?”. What do you hope to accomplish by rewiring the motor to 240V?

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

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psxstudio

15 posts in 2153 days


#6 posted 01-22-2011 05:42 AM

Thanx Knots… pictures are indeed worth thousands words. I did the rewiring at the motor junction (it was full of sawdusts =] and the motor runs really well. I think I really got a good deal on this TS… looked like it sat for a very long time. Cleaning up the cast iron table top was pain! =[

TheWood: I’m hoping to get more efficiency out of the motor by rewiring it 220… well, actually 230 since the motor plate says 115/230V.

JB

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3139 days


#7 posted 01-23-2011 08:32 AM

You didn’t mention the hp, but the most efficeincy wil be gaiined on the start up cycle.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#8 posted 01-23-2011 06:05 PM

That’s not an absolute Charlie. 230v (aka 220v), tends to have less voltage loss because it tends to be carrying half the amperage per supply leg, but that does vary a bit depending on the wiring. Most 115v (aka 110v) supply legs don’t have double the peak load capacity to compensate enough for carrying twice the current load.

Using a 13 motor example:
If wired for 110v, the entire 13 amp load is carried by a single 110v supply leg and the motor coils are wired in series, which share that 13 amp current load. If wired for 220v, the 13 amp load is shared by two 110v supply legs, each carrying half the load…the motor coils are wired in parallel and each coil gets it’s own 110v supply carrying ~ 6.5 amps of that 13 amp load. A supply line tends to be more efficient at supplying peak loads if it’s not operating near it’s capacity limit, meaning that the 220v typically has better ability to handle peak loads than 110v. If wired for 220v, a motor is likely to experience less voltage loss (and less heat) during peak demand, which in turn could result in faster startups, faster recovery from bogging, and can help extend the life of the motor.

If 220v is readily available, there’s very little downside and very little cost in making the switch (often only a new plug), and there’s possibility of some noticeable improvements. I’ve rewired two TS to 220v, and noticed an improvement with both, though one was more noticeable than the previous one. The difference varies with each individual circuit, and it’s interaction with each individual motor.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Carl Webster's profile

Carl Webster

82 posts in 2261 days


#9 posted 01-23-2011 06:58 PM

When a motor is wired for 240 Volt operation the two “run” windings are wired in series. When the motor is wired for 120 Volt operation the “run” windings are wired in parallel. In both cases there is a 120 Volt drop accross each winding. Since there is only 120 Volts available to supply the power for the parallel wired circuit it takes twice as much current/amps to power the motor wired for 120 Volt operation.

-- Carl in SC

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psxstudio

15 posts in 2153 days


#10 posted 01-23-2011 07:14 PM

The motor is 1.5HP. The motor plate on the motor says 13A at 115V and 6.5A at 230V. Prior to wiring change in the motor, the startup on 115V (dedicated circuit as well) stuttered for few seconds where as on 230V, the motor started right up. I only had the TS for few days so only time will tell. I’m totally happy with the change so far. Only gripe is that there’s slight vibration when starting and stopping the TS. I’m gonna change the belt to the link belt and see (read lots posts regarding the belts and the link belts seems to reduce vibration).

JB

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#11 posted 01-23-2011 07:33 PM

Thanks for clarifying Carl. I erroneously had the series/parallel example reversed, but the more pertinent current distribution is still a valid key point in explaining why there are some potential benefits to going with 220v/240v.

Charlie, you’re correct that switching to 220v is often credited with solving many problems that can also be remedied by installing a properly rated 120v circuit, but very few 120v circuits can overcome the losses faced by carrying twice the current load. Dedicating a good 120v circuit to a single tool’s use can improve many of the common 120v issues, but not all. When 220v is available, I’d still suggest using it. If new circuits need to be installed, 220v still offers some potential advantages.

I realize this is an age old debate that isn’t likely to be settled definitively here today. :-)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Loren's profile

Loren

8302 posts in 3111 days


#12 posted 01-23-2011 07:36 PM

I wouldn’t expect a motor to sag at that voltage on 115. Check the
belt tension, could be excessive. Even if it’s not giving you trouble at
230v it sounds a little suspicious. Taking off the capacitor and cleaning
the contacts may do some good.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3139 days


#13 posted 01-24-2011 12:02 AM

I have been doing mostly motor and control work for 43 years. I don’t know much about plugs & lighting and really don’t much care about it. Anybody can install outlets or hang light fixtures all day ;-))

The bottom line on single phase motors; @ 1 hp & above consider wiring 220, 230, 240 (what ever you want to call it, your preference, its all the same thing).

If is a noticeable lag in starting the motor of any size or voltage, it will eventually be damaged by that starting pause. It may take many years for it to show, but it will be damaged.

There is really no reason for any properly made electric motor to ever fail with the exception of the capacitor or starting switch on single phase motors or the bearings on any motor. Properly started and loaded, they last, literally, forever.

A watt of power is a watt of power whether it is at 120 single phase or 480 3 phase.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3139 days


#14 posted 01-24-2011 12:14 AM

Forgot to mention the capacitor. They definitely will hold a charge if not discharged. You discharge them by shorting across the connections with a screwdriver. What ever happened is ok ;-) Even if you jump, it was still ok ;-)) Most capacitors these days, have a built in resistor to take care of any remaining charge, but don’t rely on it.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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psxstudio

15 posts in 2153 days


#15 posted 01-24-2011 05:02 AM

Thanx Topamax. I’m totally happy with wiring the motor to 230V; no hiccups when starting and test cuts were fast on 2×4 stock. Eep… cleaning the capacitor? Hmm… charged??? might have to wait a bit. I don’t even know where it is located. Hehe. I know I bought a used saw but I’m hoping it’ll last me a while until I outgrow the saw. =]

Now, I gotta find an arbor wrench to change the blade to Freud (guy I bought it from didn’t know where he put the wrench). LOL

JB

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