LumberJocks

Jointing long pieces question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by RobS888 posted 08-31-2017 05:46 PM 477 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1680 days


08-31-2017 05:46 PM

I have a jet 12 inch jointer/planer (jjp-12hh) the tables are 55 inches long. I’m making door trim from rough cut red oak and I find that some pieces are slightly concave, so when edge planing I have some contact at the end then nothing for 5 or so feet then some contact at the other end. I feel like a chump passing the full length of the board.

Is treating one end as say a 2 foot board by lifting and moving it back then running the first bit past the cutters ok, or should I just take a deeper cut?

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.


15 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5459 posts in 2648 days


#1 posted 08-31-2017 05:49 PM

I would rip the boards wider then needed, so you can joint one edge flat.
Then you can edge plane them with the reference edge flat on the planer bed.

Lifting one end of the board to make contact with the cutterhead will not yield a straight board.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

16910 posts in 1691 days


#2 posted 08-31-2017 05:52 PM

Once it stops cutting, you can lift it and rerun the same end, but I would make sure to treat each end the same. As you go you will notice the gap under the board getting smaller. That will be your sign to run the whole board.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1680 days


#3 posted 08-31-2017 05:59 PM



I would rip the boards wider then needed, so you can joint one edge flat.
Then you can edge plane them with the reference edge flat on the planer bed.

Lifting one end of the board to make contact with the cutterhead will not yield a straight board.

- pintodeluxe


Hey Pinto,

I rip them 1/4 inch wide using a jig on the table saw, so they are straight when cut, but seem to move a bit. I wouldn’t say I’m lifting the board so much as re-positioning it. I would describe it as edge the first foot, then lift and move the board back onto infeed table and edge the first foot again. Once the cut is progressing further than the first couple inches, I could do the whole length.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1680 days


#4 posted 08-31-2017 06:01 PM



Once it stops cutting, you can lift it and rerun the same end, but I would make sure to treat each end the same. As you go you will notice the gap under the board getting smaller. That will be your sign to run the whole board.

- firefighterontheside


I wasn’t sure if it was safe. I think the helical cutters would be safer than straight blades.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

16910 posts in 1691 days


#5 posted 08-31-2017 06:15 PM

It’s safe as long as the porkchop is in place and it has stopped cutting. You can also use a hand plane first when you notice a board like that.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1680 days


#6 posted 08-31-2017 06:21 PM


It s safe as long as the porkchop is in place and it has stopped cutting. You can also use a hand plane first when you notice a board like that.

- firefighterontheside


It has a euroguard. I’m usually doing them in batches, so I look to see which side is concave, then edge joint that side, switching to a hand plane would trip me up. I’m not that good with hand planes, but it just occurred to me that I wouldn’t have to be too good, it is just waste removal until close.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9611 posts in 3482 days


#7 posted 08-31-2017 06:33 PM

In some situations snapping a chalk line
and band sawing to it makes sense.

I use the jointer exactly as you’ve described
when correcting concave edges.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5459 posts in 2648 days


#8 posted 08-31-2017 06:54 PM

Basically I’m saying use the jointer to do the straightening, not the planer.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

9754 posts in 3263 days


#9 posted 08-31-2017 06:59 PM

Make an edge guide for your circular saw. Rip the concave edge to “close”. Then joint it.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

744 posts in 330 days


#10 posted 08-31-2017 07:06 PM



In some situations snapping a chalk line
and band sawing to it makes sense.

I use the jointer exactly as you ve described
when correcting concave edges.

- Loren

I do the same as Loren described. Sometimes boards have internal stresses that only get released after you start cutting them up. So this is not unusual what you are seeing. I believe lifting and re-jointing the first (or last) part of the boards edge is safe as long as you are careful.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1680 days


#11 posted 08-31-2017 07:47 PM

Thanks guys

This is maybe 3/16 at the most and at 90 inches it is hard to even discern when I look down the edge, I mean I can tell it is concave, but it isn’t much, almost like the ends flair out a bit. I wish I had a straight edge that long.

I didn’t mention, but this is curly red oak, it seems a bit more mobile than the white oak I have used.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View RogR's profile

RogR

107 posts in 700 days


#12 posted 09-01-2017 12:56 AM

Door trim can flex a little during install, so don’t kill yourself making them perfect. I would never get anything done if all my trim had to be straight…

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

228 posts in 368 days


#13 posted 09-01-2017 01:54 AM

The short answer is yes, you can take several passes off one of the points of the crown, Often, that is what is needed

internal stress can be a pain
if this is for a door, so why do you need a 12 foot piece?
for a 3’-0×6’-8 allow 2 at 7’+ and 1 at 4’ depending on the width of the molding (shorter are easier)

I rough my stock a little wide and then rejoint and rip again. (add 1/4 to 3/8 more if it is really squirrelly)
It wastes wood, but you get a product that is nicer to work with. (yes, I take the time and make my molding straight)

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1680 days


#14 posted 09-01-2017 04:01 AM



The short answer is yes, you can take several passes off one of the points of the crown, Often, that is what is needed

internal stress can be a pain
if this is for a door, so why do you need a 12 foot piece?
for a 3 -0×6 -8 allow 2 at 7 + and 1 at 4 depending on the width of the molding (shorter are easier)

I rough my stock a little wide and then rejoint and rip again. (add 1/4 to 3/8 more if it is really squirrelly)
It wastes wood, but you get a product that is nicer to work with. (yes, I take the time and make my molding straight)

- EricTwice


Not sure where 12’ came from, more like 7 feet, but I cut a little long, my rough stock is only 10’.
They are about 7/8 thick, so pretty stout.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1565 days


#15 posted 09-01-2017 04:22 AM

Set your jointer for 1/16”. set the board on the jointer at the half way point. Run it through, turn it around, and repeat. After the second pass, start your cut from either end. You should have a straight edge when done. Take it back over to your table saw, and cut it to width. If the board is ready to stop moving on you, you will have a reasonably straight piece. It won’t be purrfect as the wood will only allow you to get close…... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com