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Need advice with Stanley hand plane

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Forum topic by Conejo posted 08-30-2017 06:44 PM 501 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Conejo

3 posts in 52 days


08-30-2017 06:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question plane resource

Hello Lumberjocks! I’m new to this forum, though I have been lurking around for some time.
Recently I came in posession of this old Stanley hand plane, made in USA, which measures 9 inches in lenght. My guess it’s a type 20 no. 4 smoothing plane, though I am not an expert.
The issue is as follows – 1. The plane frog is damaged, mainly – the holding nubs (?) of the Y lever axis are broken off. You can put the axis in, though it won’t hold. My guess is it’s useless, but I may be wrong. What do you think?
2. Which model and type is this? Are the frogs interchangeable? Ordering one from the US would cost me around 40-50$, but I am hoping there may be a British alternative to this (yes, I am from Europe).
The main body has “Made in USA” stamp on it, no patent stamps. There are some numbers as well – 3557B-9 (could be wrong about the 9, it’s rusted) and “AX” right above the raised screw insert of the rear handle. Stanley stamp is found only on the lever cap. Lateral adjustment lever has no markings on it.
My original plan was to restore it – sand it, repaint it and polish it.

Here are some of the images:

Thanks in advance for any input you might have! If there’s any need I can post more pictures.


15 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9431 posts in 3430 days


#1 posted 08-30-2017 08:20 PM

Do you have the y-adjuster and pin?

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13719 posts in 3880 days


#2 posted 08-30-2017 08:21 PM

I would look for a parts plane or just abandon this one and get an older record or Stanley from the UK eBay site.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Conejo

3 posts in 52 days


#3 posted 08-30-2017 08:25 PM

Yes I do have the Y adjuster and the pin. I will post pictures of it tomorrow. As far as I’ve read the pin itself is often bent and one should not try to straighten it, as it’s a cast metal and would break.
So regarding the frog part – it is possible to substitute it with other frog from a different type of this Stanley plane?

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Loren

9431 posts in 3430 days


#4 posted 08-30-2017 08:45 PM

I wish I could tell you, but I haven’t fussed
with nearly enough old planes to know the
answer to that question.

I think it would be less of a risk to acquire
another complete, or incomplete plane with
a matched body and frog. Aside from those
parts the other parts on Bailey pattern planes
are broadly interchangeable.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14730 posts in 2401 days


#5 posted 08-30-2017 09:32 PM

I’m guessing the first picture, the one of the frog, has been cropped off. Can’t tell by the description (the holding nubs (?) of the Y lever axis are broken off) or the picture what the exact problem is with the frog.

It’s new than a type 20; my guess is it’s newer than a type 21 as well.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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WayneC

13719 posts in 3880 days


#6 posted 08-30-2017 09:34 PM

I would think you could only swap in a frog from the same model plane. I agree with Smitty, this is a very new plane.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Loren's profile

Loren

9431 posts in 3430 days


#7 posted 08-30-2017 09:40 PM

I think we’re looking at a frog of the general
sort shown here https://s3.amazonaws.com/lumberjocks.com/mhprjti.jpg

.. with the y-adjuster pin put in from the
face of the frog. I’ve never examined this
sort of plane so I don’t know how the pin
stays in place.

Source article here: https://timetestedtools.wordpress.com/2013/02/04/tuning-it-up-bench-plane-style/

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14730 posts in 2401 days


#8 posted 08-31-2017 01:26 AM

Ah, with that picture it makes sense. Thanks Loren!

I’m guessing that frog might be cast aluminum, the way those nubs gave out? That said, there’s still no way to reform cast iron either. That leaves a replacement frog. Wonder how much compatibility there is with frogs of recent vintage?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

7955 posts in 1268 days


#9 posted 08-31-2017 01:36 AM

A #3 sized late model. I had a #4 like and I could barely give it away.

Some people would recommend putting some parts along with time and effort into it.

I’m not.

Save the iron and cap iron and place the rest in the nearest trash receptacle. You can get it to work but it’ll never be topnotch. Or assemble it and adjust it with a hammer. Unless I got a part for free I’d probably just use it as a scrub.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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bandit571

18199 posts in 2466 days


#10 posted 08-31-2017 01:54 AM

An English made “pot metal” frog. nhplaneparts had one a few months ago…..

It is the OP’s plane, up to him what he wants to do…..

Iron, chipbreaker, levercap, and the handles can be resold as parts…..handles as a “set” Iron and chipbreaker as a set. Lever cap by it’s self. Part it out, and get a bit of cash out of it. Base and frog? Throw them in with the next batch of empty cans and take to the recycle center…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Conejo's profile

Conejo

3 posts in 52 days


#11 posted 08-31-2017 07:37 AM

The Y adjustment pin:

Chipped part, circled:

The frog is cast aluminum.

So, to resume the info:
1. It’s most likely useless.
2. It’s a Stanley #3.

I am gonna go ahead and restore the body along with other parts that can be restored, since it definitely has sentimental value to me. I will also buy another Stanley plane. At some point I will probably post some before/after pictures.
I am happy to receive such feedback so quick, will stick around Lumberjocks for sure – I am only starting out with woodworking and this seems to be the place. Thanks a ton, you people rock!

View Don W's profile

Don W

18478 posts in 2350 days


#12 posted 09-01-2017 02:49 PM

Based on that last picture, I’d epoxy or jb weld the pin in place if you want to make it usable.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9431 posts in 3430 days


#13 posted 09-01-2017 04:21 PM

There’s a good bit of room there to effect
a repair. The pin doesn’t have to rotate.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14730 posts in 2401 days


#14 posted 09-01-2017 05:45 PM

Can the frog be drilled across and a longer pin be set accordingly?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Tim's profile

Tim

3598 posts in 1744 days


#15 posted 09-01-2017 09:34 PM

If it has sentimental value, it’s worth some effort. It does look like there’s plenty of metal there to follow smitty’s advice and it would hold better. Another option is to have someone weld the pin in place with some extra material to hold better.

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