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Grizzly 1023RLWX sloppy blade lift?

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Forum topic by RichGagnon posted 08-30-2017 02:40 AM 1283 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RichGagnon

6 posts in 52 days


08-30-2017 02:40 AM

Topic tags/keywords: grizzly table saw 1023rlwx

Hi, New to this board, and it appears that there is a lot of valuable info here. So I will start with a question and hope this isn’t something that has been gone over before.

Anyway, I just received my new 1023RLWX and have a question for others who own this saw. Specifically, how smooth and consistent is the blade raising wheel on your saw? My wheel seems to have a lot of play both in and out as well as the shaft wiggles a lot in all directions (up, down, left and right.) It just feels like it’s missing a shaft bushing or something. I have tried SawStop, Powermatic and have owned a Unisaw and do not remember having a lot of play in the front crank. I have never seen a Grizzly saw before, though, and am wondering if this is normal.

Will be taking a video for the Grizzly tech support tomorrow, but just want to verify that the crank should run smoothly and without any looseness.

Thanks,
Rich


27 replies so far

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

766 posts in 374 days


#1 posted 08-30-2017 03:25 AM

A video would help. There is some play is all saws.

View seturner's profile

seturner

29 posts in 201 days


#2 posted 08-30-2017 04:39 AM

I have a 1023RLX, and the wheel and shaft seem smooth and solid. However, there is a lot of backlash or free play in the bevel gears for the lift mech.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

7953 posts in 1268 days


#3 posted 08-30-2017 05:34 AM

Deburr the gears and take the backlash out.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Belle City Woodworking's profile

Belle City Woodworking

353 posts in 3799 days


#4 posted 08-30-2017 11:48 AM

I have that saw and have none of the issue that you listed.

-- Formerly known as John's Woodshop

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

7953 posts in 1268 days


#5 posted 08-30-2017 12:04 PM

Well that’s kinda the thing with Asian tools. Inconsistent quality.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Belle City Woodworking's profile

Belle City Woodworking

353 posts in 3799 days


#6 posted 08-31-2017 12:28 PM

It is that way with just about everything today. Sadly.

-- Formerly known as John's Woodshop

View RichGagnon's profile

RichGagnon

6 posts in 52 days


#7 posted 08-31-2017 02:37 PM

Thanks for all the input. Waiting to hear back from Grizzly about it, but seems a simple bronze bushing around the shaft to take up the slack where the crank rod goes through would easily and inexpensively make this mechanism much more satisfying.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

16459 posts in 1639 days


#8 posted 08-31-2017 02:46 PM

I would think something is loose and wasn’t tightened properly.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View seturner's profile

seturner

29 posts in 201 days


#9 posted 08-31-2017 03:27 PM

I retract my prior statement. I just went out to check my lift wheel, and the whole wheel will move about 1/4” up and down(total travel). Also, I can turn the wheel about 1/2” in each direction (1” total) due to backlash. Is this similar to yours?

The whole wheel moving up and down does appear to be due to space between the horizontal shaft and the cast part it protrudes through.

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RichGagnon

6 posts in 52 days


#10 posted 08-31-2017 03:47 PM

Yes, that is very similar. Unfortunately, there is little to adjust, as the design relies on a shaft captured on one end with the crank handle and the other end by the beveled drive gear. There is a movable collar near the center of this shaft, along with the crank handle, both of which are held in place by set screws. These two pieces can be moved along the shaft but if of they are pushed up tight to the bosses, there is a grinding of these rough parts. They should have thrust bearings to keep the rotating parts from the stationary bosses. This would alleviate the end to end play, as well as help with backlash in the crank. The up and down movement of the shaft could be reduced by placing some sort of bushing on the shaft where it goes through the holes in the bosses, but this does not appear to be a part of the design, either. Too bad, as a couple of inexpensive parts would make this machine much nicer. I may have to check out some other brands, although so far the rest of the machine seems solid and well made. I am also quite happy with the company’s communications and their willingness to help. I will post what they have to say.

View seturner's profile

seturner

29 posts in 201 days


#11 posted 08-31-2017 04:02 PM



Yes, that is very similar. Unfortunately, there is little to adjust, as the design relies on a shaft captured on one end with the crank handle and the other end by the beveled drive gear. There is a movable collar near the center of this shaft, along with the crank handle, both of which are held in place by set screws. These two pieces can be moved along the shaft but if of they are pushed up tight to the bosses, there is a grinding of these rough parts. They should have thrust bearings to keep the rotating parts from the stationary bosses. This would alleviate the end to end play, as well as help with backlash in the crank. The up and down movement of the shaft could be reduced by placing some sort of bushing on the shaft where it goes through the holes in the bosses, but this does not appear to be a part of the design, either. Too bad, as a couple of inexpensive parts would make this machine much nicer. I may have to check out some other brands, although so far the rest of the machine seems solid and well made. I am also quite happy with the company s communications and their willingness to help. I will post what they have to say.

From looking at the parts diagram, there is a thrust bearing(item 56)

- RichGagnon


View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

7298 posts in 2111 days


#12 posted 08-31-2017 04:03 PM

I would say that 1/2” of hand wheel movement is an acceptable amount of backlash.

Removing backlash from any acme style threaded rod is tricky, and even the most precisely machined components will have some back lash (+/- 0 only exists in our imaginations and they have to allow some clearance). On milling machines they can double the stationary acme threaded nuts with position adjustment between them, to make sure your “hard up” against both side of the screw threads at all times. But they need to do this, as they are using vernier scales on the hand wheels to exactly position the table to within .001”

On the TS, you have an arched gear rack that rides on the ACME screw, so you can’t incorporate any of the normal backlash removal techniques…. and at the end of the day, it’s not necessary, as you’re not using a scale on the hand wheel to set the blade height.

Wobble and wiggle in the shaft is another issue… and I would look for a loosely mounted bushing.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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seturner

29 posts in 201 days


#13 posted 08-31-2017 04:12 PM



I would say that 1/2” of hand wheel movement is an acceptable amount of backlash.

Removing backlash from any acme style threaded rod is tricky, and even the most precisely machined components will have some back lash (+/- 0 only exists in our imaginations and they have to allow some clearance). On milling machines they can double the stationary acme threaded nuts with position adjustment between them, to make sure your “hard up” against both side of the screw threads at all times. But they need to do this, as they are using vernier scales on the hand wheels to exactly position the table to within .001”

On the TS, you have an arched gear rack that rides on the ACME screw, so you can t incorporate any of the normal backlash removal techniques…. and at the end of the day, it s not necessary, as you re not using a scale on the hand wheel to set the blade height.

Wobble and wiggle in the shaft is another issue… and I would look for a loosely mounted bushing.

- Mainiac Matt

Thanks for the information. However, in this case it is items 57 and 58 in above illustration, which is two bevel gears at 90 degrees. I did just go check the tilt mech. on my saw, which fits your explanation, and the backlash is about 1/4” or less.

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RichGagnon

6 posts in 52 days


#14 posted 08-31-2017 04:14 PM

Hmm, I see that busing – part number 56. Do not recall seeing that on my saw. I’ll have to look more closely. However, a second bearing between the collar – part number 79 – and that boss would probably solve the issue. Still, would like to see a bushing to help with the lateral (?) slop.

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RichGagnon

6 posts in 52 days


#15 posted 08-31-2017 04:15 PM

My tilt mechanism is much tighter with minimal backlash and almost no slop.

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