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Forum topic by doubleG469 posted 08-29-2017 08:01 PM 619 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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doubleG469

307 posts in 222 days


08-29-2017 08:01 PM

I am seriously in need of a drum sander and they are ungodly expensive. I have been scouring the internet and came across Stumpy Nubs Drum Sander plans… I haven’t built any home tools yet but am seriously considering this one.

Questions are for those that have built, thoughts? problems you came across during the build? anything you would change now? And I guess the biggie what was the cost to build vs buying one?

Any help is appreciated as I don’t want to jump into something that might be better served just biting the bullet and buying.

Thanks

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"


20 replies so far

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doubleG469

307 posts in 222 days


#1 posted 08-29-2017 08:28 PM

crickets huh…

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

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papadan

3584 posts in 3146 days


#2 posted 08-29-2017 08:34 PM

Chirp…Chirp…. Sorry Gary, I’m waiting for you to build one and then keep me from making your mistakes. LOL

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Redoak49

2786 posts in 1766 days


#3 posted 08-29-2017 08:45 PM

There are quite a few posted here and on the internet….Google is your friend.

Shipwright showed how he built his here on LJ.

Yes, I have tried building one. It worked but I was not happy with it and converted to a flat sander. I powered mine with a Shopsmith.

Not an easy build, in my opinion.

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doubleG469

307 posts in 222 days


#4 posted 08-29-2017 08:57 PM



Chirp…Chirp…. Sorry Gary, I m waiting for you to build one and then keep me from making your mistakes. LOL

- papadan

You might regret that.

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

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MrUnix

5793 posts in 1977 days


#5 posted 08-29-2017 09:33 PM

You might also want to consider making one from an old treadmill, which would help keep costs down considerably since most everything you need is already there… and they can be found for free or super cheap.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Gilley23

303 posts in 160 days


#6 posted 08-29-2017 10:12 PM

Check this out, looks simple enough: https://youtu.be/p6w5f0btb8A

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Fresch

81 posts in 1698 days


#7 posted 08-29-2017 11:16 PM

754200 Inflatable Contour Drum Sander … $78.93
How big?

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shipwright

7707 posts in 2576 days


#8 posted 08-29-2017 11:19 PM



There are quite a few posted here and on the internet….Google is your friend.

Shipwright showed how he built his here on LJ.

Yes, I have tried building one. It worked but I was not happy with it and converted to a flat sander. I powered mine with a Shopsmith.

Not an easy build, in my opinion.

- Redoak49

Redoak, Sorry you had trouble with the build. You should have PM’d me. I would have been happy to help. It’s really a fairly simple build. There are at least two “copy” jobs on YouTube. (one even gave me credit).

Gary, If you already have a lathe or ShopSmith, this one saves you making most of the stuff you need to make for a stand alone. I’ve had mine for several years and it still gets used and works well for my purposes.
As I remember it cost under $100 as opposed to my Dual Drum job at home in Canada which was in the neighbourhood of $2000.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/57158

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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doubleG469

307 posts in 222 days


#9 posted 08-29-2017 11:33 PM

I saw your build and it’s very impressive. so $100 plus the Mark V (here they are from $500 to $1000 depending on condition) that in itself gets you back to just below a drum sander retail.

which is my dilemma and my original question if anyone had built the stumpy nubs one and what that cost? Google is a wonderful thing but it’s full of people selling plans or ideas. Not many breakdowns or blogs on those who have done it and the trials and costs they found.

edit: and I have neither a lathe or a shopsmith, maybe I should buy the lathe and then build your sander…. there’s a thought

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

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Gene Howe

9529 posts in 3206 days


#10 posted 08-30-2017 12:10 AM

Gary, here’s a “Shopsmith close to you. $200 isn’t bad. But, you’ll need the lathe parts. The listing doesn’t mention them.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Redoak49

2786 posts in 1766 days


#11 posted 08-30-2017 12:50 AM

The one I built worked OK. I used some of Stumpy ideas and some from Shipwright..

I made two different drums. One with stacked and turned plywood and another with PVC pipe. I bought super sticky Velcro to put on the drum and used hook and loop paper. I got it working great and the variable speed from the Shopsmith worked well.

For what I am doing, the flat sander was more useful so I converted it to that. It is great for sanding the sides of boxes and also for some of my scroll saw projects. It was not really a question of getting it to work but rather what tool worked best for my situation.

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StumpyNubs

7447 posts in 2578 days


#12 posted 08-30-2017 02:02 AM

Building complex woodworking machines is a lot of fun, but it takes some patience, and it’s not necessarily cheap. (Certainly cheaper than a new sander, though.)

A lot of folks have built my sander, I have no idea how many because a lot of folks buy plans for things like this, and never actually get around to building it. Among those I hear from, some have no difficulty at all. Others find the build to be very challenging. I think it comes down to what type of woodworker you are. If you like to take your time and be precise, you should do fine. If you cut corners, don’t check each part for square, or carefully bore your holes, you’ll be frustrated.

My sander has a lot of features others don’t have, including interchangeable drums, a feed belt (hand cranked) and most importantly, you can sand beneath the drum AND free-hand on the top of the drum like a “Sand Flea” V-drum sander. But all of these features complicate the build. And the dust collection is, by necessity, not as effective due to the design that makes upper-drum access possible.

If you don’t care about those features, and you just want a sturdy drum sander for thicknessing flat stock, there are simpler designs out there. Heck, if you have a lathe you can make a drum sander in a few hours that will do the trick.

As for cost, I can never answer that question. It depends on what you already have on hand. A motor, pulleys, bearings, shaft, etc- can you get these things locally if you don’t have them? I have no way of knowing what you will pay. I’d think you would have a couple of hundred in it, more if you need to buy a brand new motor.

While it’s possible to save money by building your own machines, it takes a lot of time and as I said, patience. If you’ve got more time than money, or like myself, you just ENJOY building your own stuff, go for it. But if you just want a drum sander, you might watch Craigslist. You may have to drive a bit, but you might find a used sander for little more than it would cost you to build one. (I found a dual-drum Grizzly for $300 a couple years ago.)

For context, here’s the sander the OP is talking about…


View on YouTube

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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doubleG469

307 posts in 222 days


#13 posted 08-30-2017 03:44 AM

Stumpy I appreciate the time a precision it goes into to make them and that’s why I was asking. I am not a precision guy, I am more of the hey let’s knock this shit out. I am sure there are thousands of guys out there who have built yours or one similar but being new I haven’t spoken to them.

with that being said I hear you have a dual drum Grizzly you’d sell for less than $300????? ;-)

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

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StumpyNubs

7447 posts in 2578 days


#14 posted 08-30-2017 04:25 AM


Stumpy I appreciate the time a precision it goes into to make them and that s why I was asking. I am not a precision guy, I am more of the hey let s knock this shit out. I am sure there are thousands of guys out there who have built yours or one similar but being new I haven t spoken to them.

with that being said I hear you have a dual drum Grizzly you d sell for less than $300????? ;-)

- doubleG469

I hope I didn’t come across like I was questioning your abilities or anything. I was just trying to be honest about how building your own machines can be a lot of fun, but it’s still a big project. Like i said, some find it difficult, while others have no problems at all.

If I just wanted to sell you plans, I’d have kept my mouth shut. :)

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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doubleG469

307 posts in 222 days


#15 posted 08-30-2017 01:32 PM

Not at all, I didn’t take it like that. My skills are novice at best anyway!

There’s always a variance from the written instructions and construction of a plan. Look at IKEA and how many people fail at putting together those simple plans. I can only imagine building a precision machine from wood and being within tolerances to keep it running smoothly and not tear up a project.

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

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