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What saw blades do I need?!

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Forum topic by HandyHousewife posted 08-29-2017 07:55 PM 356 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HandyHousewife

40 posts in 565 days


08-29-2017 07:55 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question miter saw tablesaw blade

I did it…I spent an ungodly sum of money (for us, anyhow) on a Bosch 10” Glide miter saw. Our fixer upper needs LOTS of fixing up, and our little Craftsman sliding miter saw just wasn’t up to the job. Anyway, I used the blade that came with the Bosch to finish up the last few pieces of window trim, and didn’t like how it chewed up the wood (I powered through, however, and just did extra sanding). So I know I need something different, but when I went to buy a new blade I got overwhelmed by the options and decided to ask ya’ll what I should do.

Our first big project is a deck. We’re doing composite decking, so I wondered if there a recommended blade for composite decking? Do I want a super fine-tooth one? Or just a junk one to toss out when the project is over because the composite will melt a bit on the blade and gum it up? I’ve seen a lot of those Diablo blades in different reviews, but HF has one that looks exactly the same minus the red paint, so no offense, but I’m not sure what the difference really is?

What other blades should I have in my arsenal? We have a fair amount of trim left, and I’d like to be able to use my new saw for that instead of cutting by hand like I have previously. There will also be flooring, cabinetry (probably mostly pine), and a bit of framing. I think the blade that came with the Bosch will probably be perfect for framing, but everything else is probably going to need something different.

Thanks in advance, guys! :-)

-- Striving for function *and* form, but settling quite happily for function. ;-)


5 replies so far

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Rich

1976 posts in 424 days


#1 posted 08-29-2017 11:54 PM

I’m really surprised that the Bosch blade didn’t perform well. I’ve used a $30 Makita blade on my Makita miter saw with excellent results. I’m sure you’ll get advice to check the saw setup, and that might not be a bad idea. You can find info online for that.

I do think you want an 80 tooth blade. It’s all crosscutting on a miter saw and that’s what that blade is for. Regarding it getting gummed up, all blades, regardless of what you’re cutting, get resin buildup that needs to be cleaned periodically. I use the CMT 2050 cleaning product with good results, but I’ve also heard of folks using Simple Green too.

Regarding the HF versus Diablo, again, you’ll get lots of opinions. I’d go with the Diablo, but that’s just me. My Makita blade is doing just fine too.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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patcollins

1605 posts in 2699 days


#2 posted 08-30-2017 12:05 AM

It isn’t so much the number of teeth as it is the hook angle and bevel of the teeth that give a nice clean cut, a 60 tooth Diablo gives a very smooth finish on wood, but it is high ATB and those dull quickly.

Freud makes a triple chip grind 10 or 12 inch blade specifically for composite decking. http://www.diablotools.com/products/product/D1072CD
http://www.diablotools.com/products/product/D1284CD

For wood I would get a high ATB cross cut blade, 60 tooth for 10 inch and 80 tooth for 12 inch. I find the Diablos to be very good blades for the price.

View HandyHousewife's profile

HandyHousewife

40 posts in 565 days


#3 posted 08-30-2017 02:24 PM



I m really surprised that the Bosch blade didn t perform well. I ve used a $30 Makita blade on my Makita miter saw with excellent results. I m sure you ll get advice to check the saw setup, and that might not be a bad idea. You can find info online for that.

I do think you want an 80 tooth blade. It s all crosscutting on a miter saw and that s what that blade is for. Regarding it getting gummed up, all blades, regardless of what you re cutting, get resin buildup that needs to be cleaned periodically. I use the CMT 2050 cleaning product with good results, but I ve also heard of folks using Simple Green too.

Regarding the HF versus Diablo, again, you ll get lots of opinions. I d go with the Diablo, but that s just me. My Makita blade is doing just fine too.

- RichTaylor

Thanks! I’ve watched a couple of videos (Dan Pattison and Jon Peters both have my exact saw) on how to make a zero clearance fence and a zero clearance insert to replace the ones from the factory, which is supposed to help with those things. I’ll look and see if there are any other setup things I need to check besides the ones we did when we pulled it out of the box (it seemed perfect on those). So those are on my list of things to do, but I still want to find the best blades for the things I have left to do.

-- Striving for function *and* form, but settling quite happily for function. ;-)

View HandyHousewife's profile

HandyHousewife

40 posts in 565 days


#4 posted 08-30-2017 02:28 PM



It isn t so much the number of teeth as it is the hook angle and bevel of the teeth that give a nice clean cut, a 60 tooth Diablo gives a very smooth finish on wood, but it is high ATB and those dull quickly.

Freud makes a triple chip grind 10 or 12 inch blade specifically for composite decking. http://www.diablotools.com/products/product/D1072CD
http://www.diablotools.com/products/product/D1284CD

For wood I would get a high ATB cross cut blade, 60 tooth for 10 inch and 80 tooth for 12 inch. I find the Diablos to be very good blades for the price.

- patcollins

Thanks, I’ll get the one for composite decking ordered, I haven’t seen such an animal locally, so I appreciate the links. :-)

-- Striving for function *and* form, but settling quite happily for function. ;-)

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

962 posts in 426 days


#5 posted 08-30-2017 02:35 PM

Very interesting. My experience was that with a sharp blade it really does not matter how many teeth it has for regular wood. My rip saw 24 teeth blade crosscuts as good as the 60 teeth crosscut blade. The only time there is visible difference is when cutting plywood.
However I go slow when cutting.

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