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Forum topic by Shahidan posted 08-27-2017 06:03 PM 497 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Shahidan

8 posts in 316 days


08-27-2017 06:03 PM

My miter saw has an induction motor. One thing good about it is that it is silent ,not like the type with a universal motor .
The problem with my miter saw is that after releasing the switch the blade cruises along for almost three minute before coming to a complete stop. I was told to wait until the blade stops spinning before removing the wood to avoid small waste pieces getting caught by the saw blade.

As I have to wait so long I do not follow the advice .

-- ASM


14 replies so far

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Loren

9632 posts in 3486 days


#1 posted 08-27-2017 06:10 PM

Sometimes a coasting blade indicates
bearings in need of replacement.

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Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#2 posted 08-27-2017 07:12 PM

Bearings or motor brake is/are defective. 3 min. is WAY too long a time for blade to stop.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Andybb

552 posts in 442 days


#3 posted 08-27-2017 08:26 PM

Not sure why a silent spinning saw blade is a good thing even with a working blade guard. So, is this a question about if the motor is working properly? No, it is not. I don’t think I’ve seen a modern MS that didn’t have a brake when you release the trigger. Has it always taken 3 mins or is this a new development or is the saw new to you? As stated, 3 mins is WAAAAY to long. That’s a lot of momentum for a saw blade. Is it really 3 mins? How is that possible? It would take 6 mins to square off 2 ends of a board?

As far as waiting for the blade to stop I assume you mean that you are holding the blade down until it stops. I’d raise it back up and continue on, but a blade that spins for 3 minutes means its gotta be pretty close to operating speed for at least a minute and that is a safety issue as you are reaching for a piece of wood under a silent spinning blade. That would scare the sh*t out of me. I think it’s time to repair or replace that saw. (Even with a cheap Harbor Freight) If you tell us the make and model maybe someone has some experience with that issue.

If you MUST use that saw then at least make an auxiliary zero clearance fence for it. That should eliminate the problem of small waste pieces flying about IMO.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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Shahidan

8 posts in 316 days


#4 posted 08-28-2017 12:44 AM

When I bought the saw I did not know much about a miter saw. All I know was that it was a very useful machine

The machine is a HYCO made in China . It has an AC motor with 1475Rpm . The saw works perfectly except for the problem I mentioned .

As you all says there might be a problem with the braking mechanism, I took the machine to the dealer . We checked another similar saw of the same brand and design . The tested machine also took as long to come to a complete stop . The dealer agreed that there was possibly no braking system on the saw .
The guaranty period has expired months ago . The saw is not defective in other ways so I might as well live with it . May be the waiting for the blade to stop will increase my patience and avoid accidents .

When this saw comes to the end of its life I will be more careful in choosing a good and safe one.

-- ASM

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Andybb

552 posts in 442 days


#5 posted 08-28-2017 07:26 PM

Well live and learn. Never would have thought that was normal operation. Thanks for the followup. That saw will probably outlive us all so just be careful with it. Welcome to lj’s.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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Fred Hargis

4762 posts in 2332 days


#6 posted 08-28-2017 07:41 PM

Interesting, I would have said bad bearings as well…but if a new one does it, I guess it’s the way it’s made. Welcome to LJ!

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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bigblockyeti

4698 posts in 1559 days


#7 posted 08-28-2017 08:35 PM

An induction motor powered miter saw would have the possibility of lasting nearly forever without having gears, pulleys, a belt, a commutator or brushes to wear out. I’d love to have something like that, a brake could be engineered I to the design but fitting one on a saw not originally equipped with one could prove difficult. Where did you buy it from?

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Shahidan

8 posts in 316 days


#8 posted 08-28-2017 11:14 PM

I live in Malaysia where you can get many machines made in China and Taiwan cheaply.
I do not think there is any goverrment control on imported machinery with regard to safety , In fact there are lots of local manufacturers producing all sorts of machines lsuch as sliding table table saws ,table saws ,arc (stick) welders and so forth without safety features which were required in many nations.
Most machine are many times cheaper than those made in the USA ,Germany or UK.

One thing good is that ordinary people could afford to buy them . I found one 4 feet 3hp sliding table saw costs about USD400.00 . Of course there is no fence, no tilting mechanism and no blade guard .

All the machines perform well but well,you have to provide your own sense of safety.

Thanks alot for all the replies.

See you again next time .

-- ASM

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Andybb

552 posts in 442 days


#9 posted 08-29-2017 12:19 AM

I think you just answered your own question. Makes sense now. Just more living and learning.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

979 posts in 430 days


#10 posted 08-29-2017 12:59 PM

I you have time and desire and some electrical skills you can add brakes to your saw. The simplest way is to replace the switch with some two positional switch and find some source of DC current. Wire the switch so that when you turn it from ON to Break position the motor connects to a DC source. You need to experimentally pick up the voltage of DC source so that the current would be the same or little higher than your nominal power. That would very effectively and smoothly stop your motor.

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Mainiac Matt

7464 posts in 2167 days


#11 posted 08-29-2017 01:26 PM

Sounds like an older model saw….

I suggest keeping scrap boards near the saw and after you make your desired cut, release the trigger, lift up the saw and carefully place a scrap piece over your good piece, then lower the blade into the scrap without pulling the trigger and let the blade come to a stop as it tries to cut the scrap piece.

Whatever you do… be very careful, as no amount of savings will make up for the pain and loss of ability caused by an accident.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Shahidan

8 posts in 316 days


#12 posted 08-30-2017 02:06 AM

Dear Carloz.
The motor is an induction 230vac motor .It is not a universal motor with brushes .
Thanks anyway.

Matt
I tried your suggestion but the blade stopped with considerable chatter . The chatter might break a tooth. Better no do it again > Can’t afford a new blade!

-- ASM

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Carloz

979 posts in 430 days


#13 posted 08-30-2017 11:53 AM



Dear Carloz.
The motor is an induction 230vac motor .It is not a universal motor with brushes .
Thanks anyway.
- Shahidan

Exactly ! It is easy to implement brakes for an induction motor but not so for the universal motor. There are tons of examples on the internet. Looks for DC injection in induction motor or dynamic breaking of electric motors.

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Carloz

979 posts in 430 days


#14 posted 08-30-2017 12:55 PM

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