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Shed/Workshop ADVICE???

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Forum topic by richardchaos posted 08-27-2017 01:31 PM 744 views 0 times favorited 40 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richardchaos

204 posts in 164 days


08-27-2017 01:31 PM

I have to leave my perfect set up shop and am relocating to a place with no existing shop space. I am in Illinois by the way.

I am seriously thinking of building a STORAGE SHED “LEGAL NAME” workshop. I have watched many many videos about building sheds/workshops.

I would of course be building it myself. I will have a large fence in back yard where to build this. Back yard is grass.

I would like it to be around 16×32. Common walls and a 45* roof. either a large barn type door or a manual rollup and a common door a few window and of course a sub panel electric power.

Seems since its a SHED there are numerous ways to put a foundation under the critter. Seems some are happy with taking up the turf then laying out a few inches of 3/4 inch gravel then simply placing the treated floor joists right on top of it. I think something up of the ground/gravel is better but do not wish to pour any footings or posts.

ANY SUGGESTIONS from folks that have done this.

Some of my questions are Foundation? City CODE!!!!! Power.

I would like to keep it under 5 grand!

SOMETHING LIKE THIS!


40 replies so far

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TheDane

5302 posts in 3447 days


#1 posted 08-27-2017 01:44 PM

First thing I would do is check local building codes. You don’t want to get something built then find out you are out of some sort of code compliance. And make sure you pull the necessary permits.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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richardchaos

204 posts in 164 days


#2 posted 08-27-2017 01:47 PM



First thing I would do is check local building codes. You don t want to get something built then find out you are out of some sort of code compliance. And make sure you pull the necessary permits.

- TheDane

UGH the government!

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richardchaos

204 posts in 164 days


#3 posted 08-27-2017 01:47 PM

ALSO any good ideas on alternatives to drywall?

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TaySC

265 posts in 117 days


#4 posted 08-27-2017 01:49 PM

I’m considering building a small 10×12 shed for storing my lawn tractor and lawn tools and recently researched this for Aiken, SC. For a 10×12 I am considering putting it on beams instead of pouring a concrete slab. Our city code requires the shed be at least 10 feet off the property line, but I’m in the county and they only require 5 feet off the property line.

For a building the size you are talking about I would go with a concrete slab, however. IMO that is too big to do it any other way. Just my 2 cents though.

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splintergroup

1552 posts in 1006 days


#5 posted 08-27-2017 02:17 PM


ALSO any good ideas on alternatives to drywall?

- richardchaos

Plywood. It is pricey, but it allows you to mount shelves and hang things anywhere. Typically you will want to re-arrange your shed several times before you are satisfied with the layout.

Codes/government BS considered, another option is those precast concrete piers set on top of compacted substrate.

$5k is tight for a shed that size, maybe put that money into a quality shell with good ventilation/lighting/insulation and add on the extras as funds allow.

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richardchaos

204 posts in 164 days


#6 posted 08-27-2017 02:23 PM

I think any poured Concrete anything is a bit over done for a shed/workshop. A lot of videos I see are a gravel area under the entire thing with precast pads then the treated on top of that. I also thing any POURED forms would invite the City to call it a PERMANENT STRUCTURE!

I may need to shrink my size. the space I am in now is 20×20 and thats big enough UGH! this is killing me!

View tmasondarnell's profile

tmasondarnell

58 posts in 1573 days


#7 posted 08-27-2017 02:28 PM

I can’t help you on your local codes, except to say that in most places once you get over 180 sq ft, you are no longer a “shed”, but a building with all of the code and permit requirements. Do you have an HOA?

I know this sounds strange, but I can say that $5K (even doing all of the work yourself) is a very optimistic target for the cost. Are you going to insulate the building? Finish the inside? 16×32 puts you right at 500 sq ft. With electrical, you are targeting a material costs of $10/sq ft. My back of the envelope, quick calculation has you at ~$1200 just for roof decking and T1-11 siding without any framing materials, roofing materials, windows, doors, electrical, insulation, etc.

To give you a perspective, I built my 16×24 shop in fall of 2010 and spent 8-10K on materials when it was all said and done. (not counting the concrete for the slab).

View TaySC's profile

TaySC

265 posts in 117 days


#8 posted 08-27-2017 02:41 PM


I think any poured Concrete anything is a bit over done for a shed/workshop. A lot of videos I see are a gravel area under the entire thing with precast pads then the treated on top of that. I also thing any POURED forms would invite the City to call it a PERMANENT STRUCTURE!

I may need to shrink my size. the space I am in now is 20×20 and thats big enough UGH! this is killing me!

- richardchaos

Not sure about where you are at, but here, anything 200 Sq ft or more requires a permit.

To do it right you are likely going to have to get some permits….

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

635 posts in 600 days


#9 posted 08-27-2017 03:22 PM

I have a smaller building I call my garden shed that is 12 X 16. It was built off site and set in place at my house. The foundation is pre-formed concrete pillars and beams. The structure is about 8 inches above ground level. I got around the “permanent structure” requirement by declaring it a “temporary” structure, even though it has been there for 12 years. I can’t remember what the cost was but I have considerable framing experience and I couldn’t build it for the same price I bought it. The inside remains unfinished but I could insulate and seal it in a day’s time if there were a need.

As for drywall alternatives, I recommend 7/16” exterior Masonite siding. It is stronger than drywall and is easier to install and finish. You can hang stuff on the wall with screws without hunting for studs.

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richardchaos

204 posts in 164 days


#10 posted 08-27-2017 03:31 PM

As for alternatives to dry wall. I was thinking of 4×8 sheets of pegboard or other such covered with the same material one would use as the outside padding of what they use for upholstery covered with a fabric like burlap and I could screw not the wall and be able to remove it and move. I think that would make for a very good sound insulator.

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richardchaos

204 posts in 164 days


#11 posted 08-27-2017 04:03 PM

has anyone worked with INSULATED PANELS?

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jimintx

473 posts in 1368 days


#12 posted 08-27-2017 04:31 PM

In the past, I have used T-111 siding for shop walls, and I like it a lot.

Put screws and nails anywhere, and I like the look. If you wanted lighter color to increase light reflection, it is easy enough to roll on latex paint, or of course you could spray it.

.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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patcollins

1604 posts in 2649 days


#13 posted 08-27-2017 04:55 PM

Around here anything larger than 12×16 requires a building permit, inspection, must adhere to building codes etc.

Where my mom lives the deeds say no sheds are permitted, but that hasn’t stopped some from trying.

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richardchaos

204 posts in 164 days


#14 posted 08-27-2017 05:04 PM



Around here anything larger than 12×16 requires a building permit, inspection, must adhere to building codes etc.

Where my mom lives the deeds say no sheds are permitted, but that hasn t stopped some from trying.

- patcollins

I think its a very sad commentary on American life that it seems our government is all of ours number one obstacle. to everything we do in life!

I have a client who’s dream and goal was to build a FREE community center where anyone could eat 3 hot squares a day and other admendaties. Said he was called to do it from GOD

Guess who shit canned the entire thing….. The Government!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3423 posts in 2093 days


#15 posted 08-27-2017 05:15 PM



ALSO any good ideas on alternatives to drywall?

- richardchaos

For a 16×32 keeping it at 5000 or under you’re going to have to skip the drywall.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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