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How I Remove a Recess

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Forum topic by Madrona posted 08-27-2017 05:28 AM 471 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Madrona

48 posts in 677 days


08-27-2017 05:28 AM

Awhile back I posted a video I made detailing how I remove tenons. There has been some talk lately about whether or not to remove recesses. I’ve made a video of how I do that. About 10 minutes long. Feedback appreciated. It’s not high-production, just used my phone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFnjpMcND7M

-- Living In The Woods Of Beautiful Bonney Lake, Washington


7 replies so far

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LeeMills

438 posts in 1083 days


#1 posted 08-27-2017 01:57 PM

Nice video.
My only question would be why not leave a dimple from the tailstock to re-center instead of having to fiddle around with it? The dimple is gone at the end the same as with a tenon.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Nubsnstubs

1182 posts in 1512 days


#2 posted 08-27-2017 03:29 PM

Video clarity is pretty good. You do the same thing I do and that is to position the camera, and then hold the subject piece out of view, especially at the beginning of this video.

My thoughts are you could have made a friction plate/rim/jamb chuck with a groove to fit the raised portion on the lip of the bowl. That would have automatically centered the piece, made it more stable and would guarantee a lot more success for completing this piece. You did succeed, but with that particular piece being out of balance, more security was needed than what you provided.

If you want to see what might be a better tenon/recess removing process, try my website. It’s www.wordturnerstools.com. I invented the Tail Stock Steady in November, 2012, just for securely removing tenons. After doing at least 300-400 pieces since then, I have not lost a single piece since November 2012. Sizes range from 1 1/2 foot to 19” OD bowls, and no loses. You might even be able to pull up a few threads I’ve posted here on the TSS. ......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Madrona

48 posts in 677 days


#3 posted 08-27-2017 06:02 PM



Nice video.
My only question would be why not leave a dimple from the tailstock to re-center instead of having to fiddle around with it? The dimple is gone at the end the same as with a tenon.

- LeeMills

Thanks, Lee, for your comment! Please explain how the dimple would be gone using my method. It would be covered up by the soft touch. Remove the soft touch and the piece would fall off. If there is something I’m missing I’d love to understand.

-- Living In The Woods Of Beautiful Bonney Lake, Washington

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Madrona

48 posts in 677 days


#4 posted 08-27-2017 06:04 PM



Video clarity is pretty good. You do the same thing I do and that is to position the camera, and then hold the subject piece out of view, especially at the beginning of this video. My thoughts are you could have made a friction plate/rim/jamb chuck with a groove to fit the raised portion on the lip of the bowl. That would have automatically centered the piece, made it more stable and would guarantee a lot more success for completing this piece. You did succeed, but with that particular piece being out of balance, more security was needed than what you provided.

If you want to see what might be a better tenon/recess removing process, try my website. It s www.wordturnerstools.com. I invented the Tail Stock Steady in November, 2012, just for securely removing tenons. After doing at least 300-400 pieces since then, I have not lost a single piece since November 2012. Sizes range from 1 1/2 foot to 19” OD bowls, and no loses. You might even be able to pull up a few threads I ve posted here on the TSS. ......... Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

Thanks, Jerry. I’ve seen your invention. My method works well for me. :)

-- Living In The Woods Of Beautiful Bonney Lake, Washington

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LeeMills

438 posts in 1083 days


#5 posted 08-27-2017 07:42 PM


Nice video.
My only question would be why not leave a dimple from the tailstock to re-center instead of having to fiddle around with it? The dimple is gone at the end the same as with a tenon.

- LeeMills

Thanks, Lee, for your comment! Please explain how the dimple would be gone using my method. It would be covered up by the soft touch. Remove the soft touch and the piece would fall off. If there is something I m missing I d love to understand.

- Madrona

I guess I made it confusing. When I cut a recess I cut for the jaws to seat into a dado, I don’t clear the entire interior. Usually about 3/8” width is fine unless the tops of the jaws are wider. The dimple from the tailstock is still there just like yours is with a tenon. I normally turn twice so on remounting I can sometimes change from a recess to a tenon if I wish. For example I may start with a 4” recess and upon re-turning either enlarge the recess to true or switch to a smaller tenon and use 3” jaws with a tenon.
AFAIK all of my chucks jaws are deeper on the interior than the exterior from the top of the jaws; if wood doesn’t hit the base on the outside it can’t hit the base on the inside.
Final cleanup is like your tenon video but I normally stop with about 1/8” left, then cut off and clean up with sandpaper off of the lathe.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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MrUnix

5806 posts in 1981 days


#6 posted 08-28-2017 03:52 PM

I rarely use recesses, particularly on winged bowls… but I do use a similar method for other stuff. Unfortunately, I don’t have one of them fancy centers :( Instead, I just made a MT taper and pressed a fairly standard 608 bearing on the end. Nothing special about the 608… I just happened to have one in my box of bearings (from old machines that I replaced bearings on). With that, I make various tips out of HDPE (recycled milk jugs) that fit over the OD of the bearing and can be interchanged easily. Here is a flat one that functions similar to the ‘soft touch’ thing Capt. Eddie made out of wood:

Works well and didn’t cost anything :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Madrona

48 posts in 677 days


#7 posted 08-28-2017 05:22 PM

Thanks, Lee, for your comment! Please explain how the dimple would be gone using my method. It would be covered up by the soft touch. Remove the soft touch and the piece would fall off. If there is something I m missing I d love to understand.

- Madrona

I guess I made it confusing. When I cut a recess I cut for the jaws to seat into a dado, I don t clear the entire interior. Usually about 3/8” width is fine unless the tops of the jaws are wider. The dimple from the tailstock is still there just like yours is with a tenon. I normally turn twice so on remounting I can sometimes change from a recess to a tenon if I wish. For example I may start with a 4” recess and upon re-turning either enlarge the recess to true or switch to a smaller tenon and use 3” jaws with a tenon.
AFAIK all of my chucks jaws are deeper on the interior than the exterior from the top of the jaws; if wood doesn t hit the base on the outside it can t hit the base on the inside.
Final cleanup is like your tenon video but I normally stop with about 1/8” left, then cut off and clean up with sandpaper off of the lathe.

- LeeMills

Thanks again, Lee, I understand your explanation, but you seem to be talking more about a tenon than a recess. I don’t think you explained how you get rid of the dimple, unless you are saying you sand it away off the lathe. In this case, I did leave a raised area in the middle of the recess, but I left it there as a design element. You can’t see it with the soft touch in place, but it’s there. I did not want to remove it. In any event, it took about two minutes to get my piece centered to remove the recess. I don’t consider that an inordinate amount of time and it’s really not that much of a hassle. :)


-- Living In The Woods Of Beautiful Bonney Lake, Washington

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