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Forum topic by Gilley23 posted 08-25-2017 07:17 PM 2857 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gilley23

317 posts in 166 days


08-25-2017 07:17 PM

Okay guys, I’m in search of a lathe. Space is an issue and so is money, please help me keep this budget friendly.

I want this to be something that my daughter and I can learn together, she’s 11. Just looking to do smaller things like bowls, cups, lamps, etc.

With EVERYTHING, all supplies, tools, etc, is this doable for under $1000 (or hopefully way less!)? Brand/model suggestions?

Thanks!


24 replies so far

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Gilley23

317 posts in 166 days


#1 posted 08-25-2017 07:27 PM

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TungOil

671 posts in 279 days


#2 posted 08-25-2017 07:36 PM

The link above didn’t work for me, but I think you are on the right path looking for a decent used machine. New lathes tend to be very expensive. To make your budget you will need to find a nice used machine I think.

I’d steer you away from the smaller machines in favor of something with a 48” bed. That way you will have the flexibility to make table legs if you choose to in the future.

Bowls are another story, they require a lot of clearance at the headstock if you want to spin large bowl blanks (i.e. a bigger machine). I’d also steer you away from a bench top model in favor of a floor model if you are serious about bowls. Once you start spinning a large chunk of wood anything other than a heavy floor machine will start to walk across the floor. Hopefully one of the others here that turn bowls regularly can give you more specific guidance in this area.

I have a 48” Rockwell/Delta that I have had for over 40 years. does everything I need it to, although I’m not a big turner.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Gilley23

317 posts in 166 days


#3 posted 08-25-2017 08:10 PM

Try the link again, I fixed it. Unfortunately, I don’t have room for a floor model :/ . I can bolt down a benchtop model, though!

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OSU55

1364 posts in 1773 days


#4 posted 08-25-2017 08:15 PM

This might work. Might find one used as well. https://m.harborfreight.com/5-speed-bench-top-wood-lathe-65345.html

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Rick_M

10291 posts in 2164 days


#5 posted 08-25-2017 08:28 PM


What do you all think of this?
https://charlotte.craigslist.org/tls/d/nova-comet-ii-lathe-with-tons/6246195973.html

- Gilley23

He asking pretty much full retail for a bunch of used middling level equipment, cut about $300-400 off the price and sure. @$1k the guy is on crack

Given the poor selection of used lathes in your area I would look at a new Delta 46-460 or Jet whatever. Buy something with variable speed, you’ll be glad even if you don’t know it :)

And just in case you start looking at older lathes, you might find this helpful.
http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/p/how-to-buy-vintage-lathe.html

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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TungOil

671 posts in 279 days


#6 posted 08-25-2017 08:32 PM

That NOVA lathe is only $500 new…..doesn’t seem like such a good deal to me. Keep looking.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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DS

2701 posts in 2204 days


#7 posted 08-25-2017 08:36 PM

I thought I needed a big fancy lathe until I saw one of these guys in action with little more than a stick and some rope.

I still got the big fancy lathe, but now I realize it was just a luxury item. :-D

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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EricTwice

223 posts in 317 days


#8 posted 08-25-2017 08:49 PM

http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-x-18-Variable-Speed-Wood-Lathe/T25920?iparcelcountry=US&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI7YHf8Z7z1QIVU7XACh3PUQr5EAQYAyABEgJmwvD_BwE&utm_campaign=zPage&utm_source=grizzly.com

It is a good starter lathe, look around, If you can’t find a better one used, think about it.

I own several pieces of grizzly equipment. they have done everything I have asked them to do. (professional since 1982) I can be hard on equipment.

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

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MrUnix

5812 posts in 1983 days


#9 posted 08-25-2017 09:04 PM

This might work. Might find one used as well. https://m.harborfreight.com/5-speed-bench-top-wood-lathe-65345.html
- OSU55

Or any of it’s other colors:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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LeeMills

438 posts in 1085 days


#10 posted 08-25-2017 09:42 PM

Like the others, the Nova comet on CL is more retail.
Toolsplus has it with a G3 chuck for $575 and free shipping.
http://www.tools-plus.com/nova-lathes-46300-x1.html
That said, it is a pretty decent lathe. I bought one for my daughter 3-4 years ago (whenever they first came out) and there have been no problems.
On the – side it is 3/4 hp. On the + side I don’t think it is much less than some Jets and Rikons which state 1HP but also 6 amps. You can’t get 1 HP from 6 amps on a 120 circuit. The Delta mentioned, 46-460, is 8 amp and can provide a full HP.
Lamps will be a problem with most any mini lathe. By the time you add a Jacob chuck for drilling it would have to be a very short lamp.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Gilley23

317 posts in 166 days


#11 posted 08-25-2017 10:15 PM

I wish I knew more about all of this, like the attachments I need to do certain things. Lathes are a whole new world to me, But I really think it’s something that I might actually enjoy, and my daughter would enjoy doing, too. She loves to make things and I just know that taking a hundred colored pencils and molding them in epoxy then turning it into something awesome, she would love.

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Rick_M

10291 posts in 2164 days


#12 posted 08-25-2017 10:35 PM

You’ll pick it up quickly. You have the spinny thing with motor attached, the chisels, and everything else is workholding devices.

Chisels you have carbide like Easy Wood Tool (easiest to use but not the best finish), high speed steel (most chisels), and carbon steel (old chisels, dull quickly).

Workholding you have centers which pinch the wood from each end, faceplates to which you attach the wood with screws, and scroll chucks which pinch the wood from one end.

There is other stuff but you don’t need to worry about any of it yet.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Gilley23

317 posts in 166 days


#13 posted 08-26-2017 03:00 AM

Thanks for the advice on the CL Nova. So let’s say that I throw him a $600 offer….good deal? $6-$700 a good deal?

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Kelly

1770 posts in 2728 days


#14 posted 08-26-2017 06:39 AM

I have both a small machine (Jet 1014?) and a Rockwell Delta 46-450. The big boy can do a lot, but the little Jet is gold. I say that even though the Jet a variable speed by way of belt change

Until you know where you’re headed in the turning world, little is fine. If you have room, you can keep it and upgrade too.

To me, the best way to start is small and simple. Bowls are not simple, compared to spindle work.

Even if you want to jump straight to bowls, do you need to jump straight to huge ones?

All that aside, buy the best lathe you can, but be ready to buy good knives, and a means of sharpening them properly (consistent grind, angle, etc.).

My old mini Jet has no plastic, aside from the switch. However, if all I could afford was a Harbor Freight lathe, I’d go for it, since it would be light years ahead of no lathe at all.

On knives, if it’s not high speed steel, it’s not a lathe knife. I have a set of Benjamin’s Best that I think were fantastic starter knives, but I have better too, I will still replace the Benny ones, when they’ve met the end of their service life.

If you do this for a while, you’ll want to add chucks and centers too. Not because you must, but because it’s convenient. For that reason, I like my Nova’s, because they play nicely with several different replacement chuck grip sections, but there are many other top shelf chucks too.

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HorizontalMike

7609 posts in 2698 days


#15 posted 08-26-2017 10:44 AM

I second the Delta 46-460 as a great choice. And yes, the variable speed IS that much better. I love mine… 8-)

The big word of caution that I/we can share about lathes, is that regardless of which midi-lathe (forget buying a mini-lathe) that you purchase/price, expect to double that price when it comes to buying the extras such as chucks, cutting tools, etc. You will soon discover that the “lathe” portion often ends up as the least expensive portion of this adventure. When I did my first timer search for a lathe, I started with about another $300 for accessories. FWIW, I have more than doubled that and then some, over the past +4yr.

That said, just be prepared for all of the added costs of these accessories. They do add up over time., so plan ahead for this added expense. You do not need everything at once. As you progress, your needs will guide you in what you need. A great place to shop is Penn State Industries. You can get some really good deals on cutting tool “Sets”:

My search for a lathe in 2012

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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