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Forum topic by Karda posted 08-24-2017 11:45 PM 945 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

821 posts in 392 days


08-24-2017 11:45 PM

I can’t get my chuck off my lathe. I have a HF midi lathe and my G3 chuck won’t come off. The lathe don’t have a spidle lock so the is no way to create counter pressure thanks


35 replies so far

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#1 posted 08-24-2017 11:52 PM

Put the chuck key in it, hold the spindle as good as you can, however you can, and whack the key with a wood mallet or similar. Don’t go nuts, but with a little impact, it should break it loose. In the future, you may want to put a plastic washer between the chuck and spindle. You can buy them or just make one.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Karda

821 posts in 392 days


#2 posted 08-25-2017 01:05 AM

thanks brad that worked I wished they had put spots on the spindle nut like they did the face plate

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2783 days


#3 posted 08-25-2017 06:41 AM

Ditto on the plastic washer

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#4 posted 08-25-2017 07:15 AM

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LeeMills

461 posts in 1140 days


#5 posted 08-25-2017 01:02 PM

Glad you got it off but be careful whacking the chuck key. I would clamp a rod (like a 1/2” bowl gouge) between the jaws and use it for leverage.
I don’t use the plastic washers but lots of folks make them from milk jugs or similar items.
If you have a handwheel you may be able to drill a hold through it and use the knockout bar to lock it. My lathe has a spindle lock but the knockout bar fits the holes already in my Nova handwheel perfectly. Makes sure the pin for the spindle lock stays functional for indexing … some folks have sheared the pin off.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#6 posted 08-25-2017 02:42 PM

+1 on the plastic washer. Made my life easier.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Jimbo4

1578 posts in 2602 days


#7 posted 08-25-2017 08:40 PM

Zero on the plastic washer, as it can create wobble in the chuck. To prevent the chuck from “welding” itself to the spindle, do not spin it on until it bangs against the spindle stop. Gently turn it until it firmly seats.

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected !

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Karda

821 posts in 392 days


#8 posted 08-25-2017 08:53 PM

ok thanks

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papadan

3584 posts in 3207 days


#9 posted 08-25-2017 08:59 PM

Like router bits, I use rubber O-rings to prevent sticking collets and chucks

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Karda

821 posts in 392 days


#10 posted 08-25-2017 09:42 PM

The hand wheel is threaded so that if I untighten it loosens the hand wheel. there are 2 shallow .25 inch holes in the spindle nut. I put the tip of a bolt i that for an opposite turn and it worked but is is so precarious that if I had a real bad jam the bolt might not hold. I don’t tighten the chuck tight just firm but the worm screw cam loose put everything way out of balan ce.

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#11 posted 08-25-2017 10:20 PM



Zero on the plastic washer, as it can create wobble in the chuck.
- Jimbo4

On a metal lathe it would matter, on a wood lathe it doesn’t matter. The wood moves more than the runout introduced by a plastic washer, I’ve measured it. Matter of fact, not cleaning the threads between removing and reseating the chuck, caused more runout than the plastic washer.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#12 posted 08-25-2017 10:35 PM

I’m having trouble figuring out how it would introduce any wobble at all… even on a metal lathe.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#13 posted 08-25-2017 10:40 PM

Well everything introduces runout. The chuck introduces runout. Dust introduces runout. But you’ll be measuring it in thousandths of an inch. I can put an indicator on my chuck and make the needle move with finger pressure. Even the best wood lathes are crude compared to high end metal lathes. But if I’m turning a bowl and stop for 5 minutes, the bowl is out of round when I come back so what will 0.0015” matter from using a plastic washer?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1569 days


#14 posted 08-26-2017 03:42 PM

Mike, get a piece of junk mail, punch a hole the size of your spindle, and install the chuck. Rip the excess paper from the spindle, and do your business. When you need to remove your chuck, it should come off pretty easy.

Now, with that said, if you had a Chuck Plate, you wouldn’t have a need to remove your chuck or use that worm screw. I have 3 of them. Never been used. And, I don’t even own a face plate for my PM, my go to lathe. . . ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Karda

821 posts in 392 days


#15 posted 08-26-2017 05:14 PM

yea but my lathe is short if all I did was bowel or christmas ornaments that would be ok. But if I want to make a tool handle ot something long I might not have enough room with the chuck on. What is a chuck plate

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