LumberJocks

Foot Rest Strength on Standing Desk

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Dustin posted 08-23-2017 12:37 PM 396 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Dustin's profile

Dustin

359 posts in 521 days


08-23-2017 12:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question cherry shaker

Well, somehow I’ve lucked out enough to receive another commission, so I’ll be able to start another project immediately upon finishing the one I’m working on.

This time it’s for a standing desk for a local professor. I’ve submitted a sketchup draft, which they very much liked (he’s a no frills kinda guy, hence the simple design), but I’m looking for input on a particular part. The professor wanted a foot rest, so that he could occasionally shift his weight from side to side. He won’t be standing on it completely, just taking the weight off of an old hip injury. My question is this: from the photos, can you all weigh in if the lower braces are likely strong enough for the task? The materials is 2” tall x 1 1/8” thick, made from cherry, and will be joined using mortise and tenons.

http://s1249.photobucket.com/user/hydrauncle/media/Standing%20desk%202_zps1ju8fc7u.png.html?sort=3&o=0

If this looks like the joint will fail under weight, any way I can strengthen this a little bit?

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."


11 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2560 posts in 1953 days


#1 posted 08-23-2017 01:13 PM

You need to post photo directly. To view photobucket you need a photobucket membership. Click on img button in posting window and follow script.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

359 posts in 521 days


#2 posted 08-23-2017 01:17 PM

Whoops! Sorry about that, tried just doing the imbedding, but guess I messed that up. Here’s the desk.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1593 posts in 1675 days


#3 posted 08-23-2017 02:24 PM

I’m building a standing desk now and those dimensions should be fine for the standing rail itself, although it’s not uncommon to see a metal rail for better durability.

However I’d connect the standing rail to the legs vs. having it under the desk a little bit for two reasons: comfort and better strength. I’m not adding a standing rail for mine but if I were, I’d attach them to the legs, which are thicker and stronger for a mortise than what you’ve got there. You could also build a mock-up and ask the client where it would be most comfortable.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2748 posts in 493 days


#4 posted 08-23-2017 02:32 PM

I would stagger then into the legs myself :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

359 posts in 521 days


#5 posted 08-23-2017 02:42 PM

Good points. So if I’m understanding your suggestions correctly, Travis, connecting the rails that run parallel to the front of the legs, then connecting the rails that run perpendicular to the front to those: the reverse of how I currently have them. Am I getting that right?

Makes perfect sense. I think the clearance from the ground to the rails (about 4” to the bottom of the rail, 6” to the top) will still allow for comfortable standing room while securing the main foot rest in a more substantial part of the structure.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1593 posts in 1675 days


#6 posted 08-23-2017 03:20 PM

I was thinking keeping all rails in the legs for the most stability. Found a picture of the desk that John Adams used. Rails were fairly thin compared to the big fat top but it hasn’t fallen apart in 200 years.

You could also move the side rails up like Tony said, or keep the front rail low, move the back and side rails up, make a shelf with them there – any number of things.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

879 posts in 1342 days


#7 posted 08-23-2017 03:25 PM

They are saying to have all four rails connect into the legs. Oops, I was a little slow. Just as Travis’s picture shows, but higher off the floor.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18189 posts in 2464 days


#8 posted 08-23-2017 03:27 PM

Maybe just a single one, using a sliding dovetail to connect to the side rails?

Rather plain…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

359 posts in 521 days


#9 posted 08-23-2017 05:39 PM

I actually didn’t understand what Tony meant by “staggering” until ColonelTravis clarified it, but that does sound pretty appealing, especially to break up some of that empty space.


Maybe just a single one, using a sliding dovetail to connect to the side rails?

Rather plain…

- bandit571

Plain is the name of the game here, Bandit. Though, frankly, I like simple designs like that. It just doesn’t work for this application as the client wants a rail in front as a foot rest.

On that note, I had considered ordering a small piece of thin leather to drape over the footrest. As particular as he is, I thought he might like the consideration that he doesn’t actually have to put his feet on the wood, and thought it might look classy in his office. Anyone done anything like this, or have any suggestions on where to order such a thing?

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

758 posts in 372 days


#10 posted 08-23-2017 08:05 PM

You also need to post a photo of the professor who will be standing on that foot rest.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18189 posts in 2464 days


#11 posted 08-23-2017 10:07 PM

The Wife’s Pastor now uses that stand-up desk to teach classes from….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com