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How to attach side board to table - Bowling alley table

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Forum topic by mkyb14 posted 08-22-2017 01:35 PM 5623 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mkyb14

10 posts in 34 days


08-22-2017 01:35 PM

Looking for idea’s on how to securely attach some 1in walnut I’m about to make to the edge of a bowling alley table I’ve been working on. The sides aren’t 100% flat, and I can’t make them due to nails here and there down the side. I’ve grinded them back, and recut the ends to be as flush as possible.

It’s not a perfect rectangle, so when I go to miter the corners of the walnut I’m planning to attach around the edge and bevel to the table top, I’m trying to figure out what’s the cleanest way to do so. Assuming I have some minor gaps here and there…

Just slap some glue on the side and clamp it down as tightly as possible.
Drill some holes and attach with screws, placing some dowels over it and flush cutting….

What’s the best way to attach a 1in x 2.5in boarder to a table top that’s sides aren’t perfect and will be the cleanest looking.

Album if you need photo’s to reference.
https://goo.gl/photos/ZoaL77LDFC2rhY1R6


26 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

966 posts in 2606 days


#1 posted 08-22-2017 01:46 PM

Just how I would try to solve;
Apply your edge as straight and square as possible. Set router fence with 1/8” (go 1/4” if you have larger gaps) spiral and center over seam of field & edge. Route a dado/groove over the seam 1/8” deep. Mill walnut stock to fit groove width and thicker/depth than dado. glue inlay into dado, let dry, flush inlay to top with planer sand & finish.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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AlaskaGuy

3246 posts in 2065 days


#2 posted 08-22-2017 03:24 PM

Are you saying you want to attach a 1” thick 2- 1/2 ” walnut border around the table?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Gilley23

281 posts in 138 days


#3 posted 08-22-2017 04:44 PM

If it was my table, I’d run through several inexpensive circular saw blades and cut the sides square. Cut right through the nails.

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mkyb14

10 posts in 34 days


#4 posted 08-23-2017 03:56 AM

yes, I’m looking to mill the walnut to be 1in thick, 2.5 in high (match table depth) and the lengths to size.

My initial thought was to use a forstner bit to attach it with some small screws/bolts an then use a plug to cover it… thinking about it more, wanting it to look good, I wasn’t sure if there were other ways to attach to the side of the table.

Attached is an image of one side that had a dado in it, there other is completely flat. Straight glue for something that will be used for years, didn’t seem strong enough or lasting, though I’ve seen some very old butcher blocks only held with glue.

Assuming I can square up the sides to match at a 45, or cut them to fit if they are off a little.

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jerryminer

737 posts in 1198 days


#5 posted 08-23-2017 05:57 AM

If you are planning to run a walnut strip around all four edges, mitered at the corners—- DON’T DO IT!

You will be creating a Panel of Doom

If you must have the edging, a breadboard end would serve better.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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AlaskaGuy

3246 posts in 2065 days


#6 posted 08-23-2017 07:07 AM


If you are planning to run a walnut strip around all four edges, mitered at the corners—- DON T DO IT!

You will be creating a Panel of Doom

If you must have the edging, a breadboard end would serve better.

- jerryminer


+1
That is why I was asking all the questions. I what to make sure I knew what he was doing exactly. The bowling alley piece could expand and contract in it width and ruin your work.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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mkyb14

10 posts in 34 days


#7 posted 08-23-2017 03:58 PM

so I guess I’m at a loss as to doing a breadboard with only 1in border on the table…

would someone be willing to draw a napkin sketch of how this would work?

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mkyb14

10 posts in 34 days


#8 posted 08-23-2017 05:31 PM

Attaching another photo after reading that article. The movement would still occur even if it’s glued well in place ?

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jerryminer

737 posts in 1198 days


#9 posted 08-23-2017 06:14 PM



Attaching another photo after reading that article. The movement would still occur even if it s glued well in place ? – mkyb14

Yes! There is no glue or finish that will stop wood movement. You need to plan for it. If you insist on a 1” band, you could use an interrupted sliding dovetail system (more work, I know, but tried-and-true. A mitered band is destined to fail)

Separate dovetail blocks can be screwed to the end of the table panel and a band with a dovetail slot is slid over them—no glue:

The side pieces—-where you have long-grain-to-long-grain—can be glued on. (I would set the nails—or replace them with counter-sunk screws—and flatten that edge to get a good glue joint.)

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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mkyb14

10 posts in 34 days


#10 posted 08-23-2017 07:01 PM

thank you for the photo… so for the orange end blocks and the end piece with the dovetail, no glue holds on the end pieces? just the friction holds them together?

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jerryminer

737 posts in 1198 days


#11 posted 08-23-2017 09:10 PM

Right. I’ts a mechanical connection, no glue.

The table will expand and contract with seasonal humidity changes. The joints at the corners will not always be flush—so expect that (and make sure the client expects that).

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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mkyb14

10 posts in 34 days


#12 posted 08-23-2017 09:25 PM

This is for personal use. Ok any other resources or articles on this type of joinery?

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JackDuren

313 posts in 716 days


#13 posted 08-23-2017 10:21 PM

Just 45 corners and put screws followed by wood plugs. Yes they were heavily glued…

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jerryminer

737 posts in 1198 days


#14 posted 08-23-2017 11:55 PM



Just 45 corners and put screws followed by wood plugs. Yes they were heavily glued…

- JackDuren

Jack—How many seasonal humidity changes has your table been through since you added the mitered trim? What kind of climate does the table live in?

A “bowling alley table” is somewhat different from a “traditional” table in that the individual pieces that make up the top are not glued together—only nailed. This does allow the individual pieces to expand and contract individually (potentially creating tiny gaps between individual pieces)—so the risk of creating a Panel of Doom is somewhat less. Is it enough? Personally, I would not risk it, but I have never built a Bowling Alley table—only “traditional” tables.

Anybody else have actual experience with bowling alley tables? Do they move as much as a normal table?

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3246 posts in 2065 days


#15 posted 08-24-2017 12:33 AM

This article (no I didn’t read it in its entirety ) talks about bowling alley lanes expansion and contraction.

https://www.google.com/patents/US4779868

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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