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Forum topic by Jim Crockett (USN Retired) posted 01-17-2011 04:11 AM 965 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jim Crockett (USN Retired)

852 posts in 3193 days


01-17-2011 04:11 AM

I have a 5-1/2” x 8-1/2” piece of birdseye maple that I’d like to use for a box cover. The problem is that it is warped (or twisted, I don’t really know what the difference is in the two malformations). If I place a straightedge across the grain, there is a slight gap at one edge (< 1/32”) and if I place it lengthwise, with the grain, there is no apparent gap. However, if I place the straightedge across the board diagonally, I get a large gap (> 1/16”) at one end.

Given that I do not have a jointer, a thickness planer, nor a decent handplane other than a block plane, how should I go about correcting this. My first thought was trying to correct the problem with a router and a mortising bit, security the problem board with dbl-stick tape. Another thought is to tape a piece of 80 grit sandpaper to a flat surface and sand the faces on this. But, if I do this, should I shim the low area with a piece of wood glued to the surface?

I hate to throw this piece out as I’m sure there is a way to correct the problem. I’m just not sure what the best method would be.

Any suggestions?

Jim

-- A veteran is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including his/her life".


3 replies so far

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swirt

2117 posts in 2431 days


#1 posted 01-17-2011 04:45 AM

Jim given what tools you have, a router with a straight bit and a sled would do it. ... though building that you might be better served to just go buy a jack plane.

The trick in either case is to split the difference in knocking off the high points on each side. If you just try to knock it all flat on one side, then the other you will end up with a board that is much thinner than it could have been if you split the difference on the high points.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2534 days


#2 posted 01-17-2011 03:28 PM

I think it would take less time if you used the sandpaper approach. I’d use an even courser grit to start (40 or 60). I don’t see a need to shim but I would work on both sides.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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Jim Crockett (USN Retired)

852 posts in 3193 days


#3 posted 01-19-2011 04:09 AM

After a bit of work, I now have the two faces of this board flat and parallel. Here’s how I did it.

I used double-stick tape to adhere a sheet of 60# sandpaper to a sheet of melamine (for flatness). I then adhered a short piece of 2×4 to the one side to use as a handle, again using double-stick tape. I sanded the ‘down’ side for a while, then drew marks with a pencil side to side for the entire length of the board. Made a dozen passes on the sandpaper and checked, noting that the lines were not all removed. I continued sanding, drawing lines, and checking until a few passes removed all of the pencil marks evenly. At this point, I figured that side was flat.

I then adhered the good side of the board to the melamine with double-stick tape. Set my router up with skis and with a 1-1/4” mortising bit and ‘planed’ down aboaut 1/8” per pass until I achieved just over 1/2” thickness.

Hand sanded the slight roughness left by the router bit and I now have a 1/2” board, flat and with the two faces parallel. Quite a bit of work but I achieved the result I was looking for – what more can I ask?

Jim

-- A veteran is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including his/her life".

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