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Forum topic by Kevin posted 01-17-2011 02:01 AM 3546 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kevin

462 posts in 2666 days


01-17-2011 02:01 AM

Topic tags/keywords: stain finish tv console entertainment entertainment center

Hey all,

here is a link with a photo of a entertainment center. What i’m wondering is how do you think the finish is done? Is it painted first then a light stain applied and wiped off?

I’m getting ready to design a entertainment center similar to this, but won’t actually get to start on it till a few other small projects are done.

Link:
http://images.hayneedle.com/mgen/master:RVS1042.jpg?is=1600,1600,0xffffff

Thanks,

Kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY


5 replies so far

View huff's profile

huff

2828 posts in 2746 days


#1 posted 01-17-2011 03:52 AM

Kevin, This type finish is usually done with a glaze. It’s painted first (like an antique white, but really can be any color). Then a glaze is applied over that. A glaze is alot like a stain, but designed to be applied over another finish. You can get a glaze in a lot of different shades. You can get glazes at any of your major paint companies, someone like Sherwin Williams or Glidden. You may be able to find it at your big box stores, but I’ve never really checked there. The final look you want will depend on the amount of glaze applied and how much you wipe back off. This you will want to play with on some sample boards, but make sure you use something that has some profiles etc, so you can see how it looks when the glaze is left in cracks and profiles and not just on a flat surface. You will want to put a clear top coat over every thing when done. This is a very abreviated version of how it’s done, but you can get an idea of how the process works and it’s a lot of fun to play with the different looks you can achieve when working with glazes. It’s really up to your taste and what pleases you. Good luck and let me know if you have any questions. Hope to see your project posted in the future.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

462 posts in 2666 days


#2 posted 01-17-2011 04:28 AM

Thanks Huff,
That is exactly what I was looking for. How long would you normally leave the glaze on before wiping it back off?

Hopefully i’ll be posting a few projects here in the future.

Kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

1159 posts in 2151 days


#3 posted 01-17-2011 05:12 PM

Huff has it right.
Two ways of applying the glaze:
With a rag, which will give you a more worn, dirty, antique look. Much like your picture.
With an artists brush, which will give a more precise line of glaze, which you usually don’t remove any of.

Good luck with your project!

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

View huff's profile

huff

2828 posts in 2746 days


#4 posted 01-17-2011 07:56 PM

Kevin, I like aplying the glaze with a rag like Earlextech said, because of the overall look that it gives you. I wipe off the excess as I go. Once you’ve acheived the look you want, let it dry the manufacturer’s recommended time before applying a clear coat. Good luck.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

462 posts in 2666 days


#5 posted 01-18-2011 02:49 AM

Thanks guys. Looks like I will be routing some profiles of different sorts on scrap wood for experimentation :)

Kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY

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