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Forum topic by handystanley posted 1320 days ago 1599 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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handystanley

165 posts in 1546 days


1320 days ago

Please see the two attached photographs.

The back is spliting on one of our kitchen chairs. The chair was manufactured in either the late 1940’s or early 1950’s and is 3/4” solid pine.

My question is, after breaking the chair at the split should I mend the chair using dowels, biscuits, or use a spline? If you need to see another angle or need to have me upload another picture please let me know.

Thanks.

Stan

-- "Projects beget projects and projects beget the need to buy new tools and that is what the cycle of life is all about." Stan Pearse, Novato, CA


20 replies so far

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1707 days


#1 posted 1320 days ago

I would not break the chair at the split. I would open it up as much as you can without breaking it and brush glue into the break. Cover both sides of the break as completely as you can and clamp it up securely.

Think ahead about exactly how you will clamp it. You may want to make a caul or a jig.

If you glue this up properly, the glue bond will be stronger than the wood around it.

You’ll have some squeeze out to deal with but that should not be a big problem. I would let it harden a little and then take if off with a scraper.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2455 days


#2 posted 1320 days ago

Rich is on target as usual. As long as you can get some glue or epoxy in the crack it will do a good repair job on the chair. I would only open it up further if you can’t get glue in there. You may want to insert some shims (toothpicks, etc.) to hold it open while applying the glue. As Rich says do a dry clamping run before applying the glue.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2364 posts in 1594 days


#3 posted 1319 days ago

What rich and Scott said. Get a syringe from a local farm supply store and inject glue in the crack. They are cheap and don’t come with needles. Great for jobs like this.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1748 days


#4 posted 1319 days ago

just remember to cover with some plastick so you don´t glue other wood the the chair :-)
Rich is right on

Dennis

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1683 days


#5 posted 1319 days ago

Don’t break it! Either spread glue around in there, or the syringe idea will really get into all the crevices. Might want to use blue painters tape near the crack in case you get a lot of squeeze-out, then let the glue tack up if it’s wood glue then scrape it off, or if you use epoxy (may come with a syringe-type applicator), you’;;l have to scrape any squeeze out after it sets.

And definitely do a dry clamp up first so that you’re positive it’s all going to line up and the clamps are sufficient and in the appropriate place before you stick any glue in the crack.

I know I more or less reiterated the above comments, but it was good advice.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1707 days


#6 posted 1319 days ago

FWIW – I advise you to not use epoxy. It’s too messy.

My recommendation is Tite Bond III. It has a relatively long open time so you can take your time when applying the glue and make sure you cover the entire break evenly.

I think (not certain) that it officially has a 10 minute open time. I’m sure you are safe to assume you have at least a 5 minute open time. That’s plenty.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1683 days


#7 posted 1319 days ago

Rich, you’re correct. TBIII has a 10-minute open time.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View HallTree's profile

HallTree

5661 posts in 2400 days


#8 posted 1319 days ago

In addition to the above, you might want to put some kitchen plastic rap on both sides of the split and then somehow clamp boards on both sides of the split to help keep things stright.
So far no one has said anything about the finishing after the repair. What are you planning?

-- "Hold on to instruction, do not let it go; guard it well, for it is your life" Solomon

View tbone's profile

tbone

256 posts in 2317 days


#9 posted 1319 days ago

I will not add to anything to what has been said before me—because I agree with the solutions.

However, I would like to see a picture of the complete chair! It looks pretty cool from the glimpse of it that we see. Maybe even a future project.

Go Cowboy…er, oh, nevermind.

-- Kinky Friedman on gay marriage: "They should have the right to be just as miserable as the rest of us."

View herg1's profile

herg1

42 posts in 2345 days


#10 posted 1319 days ago

As was stated previosly, you can get a syringe at most any farm/feed store. Ask them for one of their large needles so the glue will easily pass through it. The last one I bought was a fewyears ago and the cost was well under $3. The Tightbond will wash out without any problem and the syringe will be readdy for any future glue-ups.

-- Roger1

View handystanley's profile

handystanley

165 posts in 1546 days


#11 posted 1319 days ago

This morning I went to our local ACE hardward store and purchased some Titebond III and some syringes / glue injectors. Upon coming home I lcut about a four inch wide strip of plastic to put between the plywood board and the chair adn laid some plastic out on the table. Then I injected the glue using the syringe into the crack and gently bent the back of the chair back and forth GENTLY to draw the glue into the crack, upon which I clamped everything up. Finally I injected more glue where there was a gully.

Look forward to seeing how the chair back glues up tomorrow when I release the clamps.

Any further comments so far??

-- "Projects beget projects and projects beget the need to buy new tools and that is what the cycle of life is all about." Stan Pearse, Novato, CA

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1683 days


#12 posted 1319 days ago

So did you just use the one strap then on the side-to-side axis? I don’t see anything on the top half?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1748 days


#13 posted 1319 days ago

if that doesn´t do it you have to make a jiig that fits in on the inside of the back near the top
so you can get pressure at the right place

thank´s for the update looking forward to the next :-)

Dennis

View handystanley's profile

handystanley

165 posts in 1546 days


#14 posted 1319 days ago

First good thing I re-read the instructions on the backside of the glue bottle. Just released all the clamps and am now just letting the chair set-up.

@Jonathan…because of the “wings” at the top of the chair I felt I could not use another strap clamp to pull in the chair back to put pressure on the butt joint.

Of course one of the family cats had to get in the middle of everything and she ended up getting glue on herself from laying down on a glue puddle. LOL!!

-- "Projects beget projects and projects beget the need to buy new tools and that is what the cycle of life is all about." Stan Pearse, Novato, CA

View handystanley's profile

handystanley

165 posts in 1546 days


#15 posted 1319 days ago

@ Dennis…great idea about using plastic! Thanks.

-- "Projects beget projects and projects beget the need to buy new tools and that is what the cycle of life is all about." Stan Pearse, Novato, CA

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