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(closed) How safe is Sawstop?

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Forum topic by MrRon posted 08-17-2017 05:27 PM 2615 views 0 times favorited 174 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

4308 posts in 2999 days


08-17-2017 05:27 PM

Please don’t get all defensive over my question. I don’t own a Sawstop, but I do appreciate it’s safety feature. We all know nothing is perfect. The best tool, car, machine, airplane, etc; you get the point. That said, What is the probability that any flesh sensing technology, (Sawstop) could fail resulting in loss of fingers or more? Any such failure would result in a massive law suit. Maybe that is why Steve Gass sold it to TTS, to avoid any possible litigation. What are your thoughts on this?


174 replies so far

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jmartel

7332 posts in 1905 days


#1 posted 08-17-2017 05:40 PM

Either way, it’s still safer than a normal table saw. I don’t own one, but I wish I did.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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gargey

794 posts in 531 days


#2 posted 08-17-2017 05:44 PM

It’s 83.725% safe, compared to 71.11375% safe for a Unisaw, and 98.1435% safe for a handsaw.

Routers are only 64.11355725% safe.

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doubleG469

251 posts in 200 days


#3 posted 08-17-2017 05:46 PM

always that one guy….

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

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bbasiaga

954 posts in 1750 days


#4 posted 08-17-2017 05:57 PM

It’s reliable enough that most people on the Internet are worried about false positives/inadvertent trips.

The circuit itself probably has been tested to one failure in 10,000 or 100,000 , which would be 99.9999 or 99.99999% reliable. I don’t know this for a fact, but that is typical for things like airbags and explosion prevention systems which use similar curcuitry.

My thoughts are that Gass did not sell out over this fear. The saw has been on the market a long time now, and cut hundreds of thousands of hot dogs. If it didn’t work, the haters would have made sure we know about it. The sale to Festool parent was probably about cashing in, free capital to grow the business, and access to international markets.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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DrDirt

4381 posts in 3497 days


#5 posted 08-17-2017 06:22 PM

Like Brians point at the end…
If there were videos of hotdogs getting cut in half, at a woodcraft or woodworking show, it would be all over the internet/youtube… showing the ‘1 time it failed’ to be trumpeted by everyone that didn’t like Gass, to say SEE SEE SEE!!!! it is crap and doesn’t work!!

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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AZWoody

1062 posts in 979 days


#6 posted 08-17-2017 06:26 PM

I doubt he sold in fear of a lawsuit. He would not be able to even go to market if he did not have some sort of liability insurance. I’m sure it’s very expensive but he would be covered. He’s an attorney, he would have made sure his bases are covered.

I seriously considered a Sawstop but my needs were better met with a format table saw. It has it’s own safety features in that the hands go nowhere near the blade and you are off to the side of the blade in event of kickback.

I have my reservations about his methods of trying to get a law passed and that does turn me off, but in the end, it is a safer product. It’s like dust collection. There’s a cost vs safety ratio that everyone has to consider for themselves.

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Dwain

439 posts in 3614 days


#7 posted 08-17-2017 06:36 PM

Listen. It works. The safety in a SawStop is there. That has been proven. ALSO the saw is of fantastic quality. It is an excellent unit. I believe most woodworkers if given the option would replace their own table saw with a SawStop. I can’t afford one, and I don’t believe I will ever spend what it costs to buy one. I am happy with the cabinet saw I have; so I just pay more attention when I use it. I don’t have that safety net. Ideally, you would have the safest saw and be as safe a woodworker as possible. How important is it to you? Again, it’s out there and it works. IF you want the safest table saw, get a SawStop. If you want to be a SAFE woodworker, a SawStop isn’t needed, but it helps.

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

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doubleG469

251 posts in 200 days


#8 posted 08-17-2017 06:41 PM

Oh and as for costs as I inadvertently posted in another forum that I thought was about table saws…


As of today, i will only buy a sawstop.

Massive jagged fracture, 15 stitches (Not enough meat for the rest), so I d say price the sawstop. Imho

- doubleG469

The ER bill will be more than the table saw guaranteed. So take it for what it’s worth. IMHO

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

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AlaskaGuy

3235 posts in 2064 days


#9 posted 08-17-2017 06:44 PM



always that one guy….

- doubleG469

Always that one guy without a sense of humor and has a need to chastise other for their sense. Just saying.

A good sense of humor is a sign of psychological health.

https://qz.com/768622/a-good-sense-of-humor-is-a-sign-of-psychological-health/

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View TaySC's profile

TaySC

218 posts in 88 days


#10 posted 08-17-2017 07:13 PM

My personal thoughts are that some people with sawstop will start to become more careless relying too much on the saw to not cut them, rather than using common sense.

We all know that sawstop works and is a solid product.

What we don’t need, however, is for people to start becoming careless.

Remember, just because gun safeties work doesn’t mean we point a loaded gun at someone with the safety on and pull the trigger.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4614 posts in 2248 days


#11 posted 08-17-2017 07:43 PM

Someone above mentioned…you can bet that when a SS fails the news will spread like wildfire through forums and other social media. I’m sure there’s a chance, but it’s extremely small. One other thing, I always wondered about the “shelf life” of the cartridges…apparently there is none; good to the day they are tripped. I know a fellow on another forum tripped his. It was the original in the saw; purchased in 2006.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View dmo0430's profile

dmo0430

51 posts in 758 days


#12 posted 08-17-2017 08:01 PM

I read a post about someone who turned the sensor off for a cut. Didn’t turn it on and next time he was in the shop made a couple of mistakes and lost a bunch of fingers. I’m sure the tech is pretty good or like people have said someone would have pointed it out. You can’t count on the human aspect of the “tech” though and we’ll still make mistakes like thinking the safety is on when it isn’t. (Just to add to Tay’s point)

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AlaskaGuy

3235 posts in 2064 days


#13 posted 08-17-2017 08:12 PM


I read a post about someone who turned the sensor off for a cut. Didn t turn it on and next time he was in the shop made a couple of mistakes and lost a bunch of fingers. I m sure the tech is pretty good or like people have said someone would have pointed it out. You can t count on the human aspect of the “tech” though and we ll still make mistakes like thinking the safety is on when it isn t. (Just to add to Tay s point)

- dmo0430

As safe as the operator.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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richimage

38 posts in 1485 days


#14 posted 08-17-2017 08:49 PM

DMO0430, as I read your post, something jangled my (limited) memory, so I checked, and SawStop says:
“When you have completed your cut, push the Start/Stop paddle in to turn off the motor. The safety system
will remain in Bypass Mode until the blade comes to a complete stop. Once the blade has stopped, the
safety system returns to normal Standby Mode. The next time you start the motor, the safety system will be
active unless you repeat the procedure described above to start the motor in Bypass Mode.” I recall that because I had the same question in my mind about using the bypass…

richimage

-- "Women are like modern paintings. You can't enjoy them if you try to understand them." Farrokh Bulsara (Freddie Mercury)

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4614 posts in 2248 days


#15 posted 08-17-2017 08:51 PM

Yep, the accident as described isn’t possible unless there was a major malfunction with the saw. It (the safety system) resets after it’s switched off.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

showing 1 through 15 of 174 replies

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