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Changing the angle of already angled piece

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Forum topic by Huds posted 08-14-2017 07:21 PM 291 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Huds

24 posts in 1441 days


08-14-2017 07:21 PM

Hi all. I don’t frequent here as much as I’d like but I’ve come across a little dilemma, thought I’d seek some advice.

If you go here: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3a/ca/44/3aca445cdd122f78621b53db0a575b32.jpg

you’ll see an example of old wooden insulator side pins, used to mount insulators on the side of virtually anything back in the day. I want to make some clocks using these. You would arrange these radially, angled faces opposing from one pin to the next. The angle on the originals is about 16 degrees. I’ve seen where people re-cut them to a 30-degree angle in order to get a clock with 12 pins (360/12 = 30-degrees) but this drastically shortens them and they are not true to original form.

I’d like to keep it with 12 insulator pins and use 12 alternating wedge spacers, maybe of a contrasting wood species (the originals are oak). That would make 24 pieces of the “pie” total, each needing to be 15 degrees.

One of my main problems is recutting the originals which are at ~16-degrees to 15 degrees. I figure a jig on the band saw is the way to go, maybe just joint one face flat, then go to the jig to cut the other side to 15 degrees. Any thoughts on how to re-cut the originals to a specific angle?

Also, any error is going to get compounded fast with 24 pieces needing to equal 360 degrees total. Any ideas on how to minimize this error or how to correct it? I suppose if I make a sled type jig for cutting the angles, I could use ultra thin shims, like a sheet of paper at a time, to get the final angle dead on.

I have a limited supply of these pins, they are getting hard to come by, so I don’t want to botch any if I can help it.

Any thoughts or ideas would be super, Don’t really have anyone local to me to bounce this kind of thing off of.


6 replies so far

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MrRon

4492 posts in 3078 days


#1 posted 08-14-2017 07:27 PM

A jig on a table saw is the way to go. It will take many trial cuts on scrap to get the 15° angle needed.

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Huds

24 posts in 1441 days


#2 posted 08-14-2017 07:29 PM

Thank you sir. Would you envision essentially a custom taper cut jig tailored for this? I’ll probably make 3 clocks, maybe more over time, seems like it would be worth it to come up with something very specific to this job.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9608 posts in 3482 days


#3 posted 08-14-2017 09:36 PM

Disk sanders excel at fudging angles. The
table saw jig is a good idea too. You’ll
find it very challenging to cut all your
parts so they fit together in a 360 degree
form. In order to avoid gaps I would glue
each half up and true the edge on a flat
surface with coarse sandpaper taped
to it, a “sanding board”. This can be done
on the disk sander as well if the sander is
large enough.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

206 posts in 454 days


#4 posted 08-14-2017 09:40 PM

If you cut your wedges at 14 degrees, you won’t need to cut the originals.
Perhaps if you glue your wedge material to the original and then cut the assembly to 30 degrees you’ll compensate for any variations in the originals. Should be relatively easy to set up a taper jig for 30 degrees. Fewer cuts means less error compounding.

Just a thought.

-- Sawdust Maker

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Huds

24 posts in 1441 days


#5 posted 08-14-2017 09:41 PM

Ah, doing one half at a time is a great idea, hadn’t thought of that. I have used my table saw as a flat surface for a sanding board, granite top, it’s a good flat reference surface. I could potentially do 1/4 of it at a time, and work to a 90-degree angle, that way I spread any variance out over more joints than just 2 where it could potentially be more noticeable. Hopefully I can get it close enough to where doing one half at a time will work. Thanks!

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Huds

24 posts in 1441 days


#6 posted 08-14-2017 09:42 PM



If you cut your wedges at 14 degrees, you won t need to cut the originals.
Perhaps if you glue your wedge material to the original and then cut the assembly to 30 degrees you ll compensate for any variations in the originals. Should be relatively easy to set up a taper jig for 30 degrees. Fewer cuts means less error compounding.

Just a thought.

- LittleShaver

Ah, more great ideas, thanks. I hadn’t thought about the different angle wedges, or trying to put a pin and a wedge together first and work from those as a unit. Thanks very much!

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