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Forum topic by Rolle2259 posted 08-13-2017 10:06 PM 1001 views 0 times favorited 44 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rolle2259

2 posts in 120 days


08-13-2017 10:06 PM

Need advice on power amperage. Planning on purchasing new Sawstop 3 hp rated at 220v 15 amps. My shop is primarily wired with 220v 50 amp outlets for welders. Can i run my 220v 15 amp equipment on a 220v 50 amp circuit without any problems? I have been running a 220v 15amp air compressor on the 50amp circuit without any apparent issues. Just want to make surethis wold not harm the electricmotors


44 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

5978 posts in 2032 days


#1 posted 08-13-2017 10:42 PM

Can i run my 220v 15 amp equipment on a 220v 50 amp circuit without any problems?
- Rolle2259

Absolutely – no problem at all.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View jonah's profile

jonah

1443 posts in 3132 days


#2 posted 08-14-2017 03:42 AM

The biggest problem you’ll run into is the plug. The 50A receptacle won’t fit the plug on the Sawstop, so you’ll have to cut it off and put the proper plug on. Not a big deal.

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MrUnix

5978 posts in 2032 days


#3 posted 08-14-2017 03:43 AM

The 50A receptacle won’t fit the plug on the Sawstop, so you’ll have to cut it off and put the proper plug on.

Or just make a short pigtail/adapter.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View msinc's profile

msinc

98 posts in 337 days


#4 posted 08-14-2017 10:58 AM


Need advice on power amperage. Planning on purchasing new Sawstop 3 hp rated at 220v 15 amps. My shop is primarily wired with 220v 50 amp outlets for welders. Can i run my 220v 15 amp equipment on a 220v 50 amp circuit without any problems? I have been running a 220v 15amp air compressor on the 50amp circuit without any apparent issues. Just want to make surethis wold not harm the electricmotors

- Rolle2259

It will certainly run it and no, it wont hurt the motors. The issue is having 50 amps of power available to a machine that is rated for 15. No, it wont hurt it in a sense of “overdoing it” as the amperage suggest, and yes you might have to change the plug to get the machine and the outlet compatible….but, there is a reason they rate electrical devices with an “operational” figure. If the saw is 15 amp rated you should not deliver more than required. It may be confusing because while the saw, when operating properly will only draw what it needs all is well and it wouldn’t matter if you had it on a 200 amp circuit {in theory} it will still draw probably 9-10 on start up and 3-4 while running. Now, throw in a problem, like a short in the motor or switch and instead of tripping a breaker at 15 amps and stopping everything you still have 35 amps more before it trips…..what does all this mean? Well, you can start one heck of a fire and burn down the neighborhood with the extra amps now being delivered to the machine. You could also get shocked. You don’t want to get hit with 220 anyway, but 15 amps or less is better than 50 for sure. It could also mean the difference between jamming the saw and tripping the proper breaker with no damage {15 amp breaker trips} or jamming the saw and blowing it up, getting you shocked and starting a fire {not tripping at 45 amps because you have a 50 amp breaker}.
For safety sake you really should run the proper rated circuits, you are not going to do that anyway, it cost money, I get it. I would suggest that you at least install the proper rated breakers.

View chrisirving's profile

chrisirving

51 posts in 265 days


#5 posted 08-14-2017 12:06 PM


Need advice on power amperage. Planning on purchasing new Sawstop 3 hp rated at 220v 15 amps. My shop is primarily wired with 220v 50 amp outlets for welders. Can i run my 220v 15 amp equipment on a 220v 50 amp circuit without any problems? I have been running a 220v 15amp air compressor on the 50amp circuit without any apparent issues. Just want to make surethis wold not harm the electricmotors

- Rolle2259

It will certainly run it and no, it wont hurt the motors. The issue is having 50 amps of power available to a machine that is rated for 15. No, it wont hurt it in a sense of “overdoing it” as the amperage suggest, and yes you might have to change the plug to get the machine and the outlet compatible….but, there is a reason they rate electrical devices with an “operational” figure. If the saw is 15 amp rated you should not deliver more than required. It may be confusing because while the saw, when operating properly will only draw what it needs all is well and it wouldn t matter if you had it on a 200 amp circuit {in theory} it will still draw probably 9-10 on start up and 3-4 while running. Now, throw in a problem, like a short in the motor or switch and instead of tripping a breaker at 15 amps and stopping everything you still have 35 amps more before it trips…..what does all this mean? Well, you can start one heck of a fire and burn down the neighborhood with the extra amps now being delivered to the machine. You could also get shocked. You don t want to get hit with 220 anyway, but 15 amps or less is better than 50 for sure. It could also mean the difference between jamming the saw and tripping the proper breaker with no damage {15 amp breaker trips} or jamming the saw and blowing it up, getting you shocked and starting a fire {not tripping at 45 amps because you have a 50 amp breaker}.
For safety sake you really should run the proper rated circuits, you are not going to do that anyway, it cost money, I get it. I would suggest that you at least install the proper rated breakers.

- msinc


I’m an electrical contractor and msinc summed it up perfectly! It’s usually not that hard to do it the right way and you’ll never have problems and have to worry about what could go wrong

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2707 posts in 3271 days


#6 posted 08-14-2017 12:07 PM

Really, you need to put in a new ganged 15 amp breaker with a 12 or 10 wire and the correct config plug. Anything much beyond 15 or 20 amps and it’s almost like not having a breaker for the device. The saw or wiring would have to heat up to 50 amps before tripping the breaker with the welding circuit.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View msinc's profile

msinc

98 posts in 337 days


#7 posted 08-14-2017 04:31 PM


Need advice on power amperage. Planning on purchasing new Sawstop 3 hp rated at 220v 15 amps. My shop is primarily wired with 220v 50 amp outlets for welders. Can i run my 220v 15 amp equipment on a 220v 50 amp circuit without any problems? I have been running a 220v 15amp air compressor on the 50amp circuit without any apparent issues. Just want to make surethis wold not harm the electricmotors

- Rolle2259

It will certainly run it and no, it wont hurt the motors. The issue is having 50 amps of power available to a machine that is rated for 15. No, it wont hurt it in a sense of “overdoing it” as the amperage suggest, and yes you might have to change the plug to get the machine and the outlet compatible….but, there is a reason they rate electrical devices with an “operational” figure. If the saw is 15 amp rated you should not deliver more than required. It may be confusing because while the saw, when operating properly will only draw what it needs all is well and it wouldn t matter if you had it on a 200 amp circuit {in theory} it will still draw probably 9-10 on start up and 3-4 while running. Now, throw in a problem, like a short in the motor or switch and instead of tripping a breaker at 15 amps and stopping everything you still have 35 amps more before it trips…..what does all this mean? Well, you can start one heck of a fire and burn down the neighborhood with the extra amps now being delivered to the machine. You could also get shocked. You don t want to get hit with 220 anyway, but 15 amps or less is better than 50 for sure. It could also mean the difference between jamming the saw and tripping the proper breaker with no damage {15 amp breaker trips} or jamming the saw and blowing it up, getting you shocked and starting a fire {not tripping at 45 amps because you have a 50 amp breaker}.
For safety sake you really should run the proper rated circuits, you are not going to do that anyway, it cost money, I get it. I would suggest that you at least install the proper rated breakers.

- msinc

I m an electrical contractor and msinc summed it up perfectly! It s usually not that hard to do it the right way and you ll never have problems and have to worry about what could go wrong

- chrisirving

Thank you sir, it is very kind of you to say so.

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

91 posts in 1754 days


#8 posted 08-14-2017 05:07 PM

What wire do you have running to the 50a opening? 2 hots, 1 neutral, 1 ground? 2 hots and a bare ground? Is it in pipe?

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Rolle2259

2 posts in 120 days


#9 posted 08-14-2017 05:41 PM

Two Hots and a ground in a pipe. Not sure if the ground is bare or not.

Thank You

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

477 posts in 1303 days


#10 posted 08-14-2017 05:57 PM


Need advice on power amperage. Planning on purchasing new Sawstop 3 hp rated at 220v 15 amps. My shop is primarily wired with 220v 50 amp outlets for welders. Can i run my 220v 15 amp equipment on a 220v 50 amp circuit without any problems? I have been running a 220v 15amp air compressor on the 50amp circuit without any apparent issues. Just want to make surethis wold not harm the electricmotors

- Rolle2259

It will certainly run it and no, it wont hurt the motors. The issue is having 50 amps of power available to a machine that is rated for 15. No, it wont hurt it in a sense of “overdoing it” as the amperage suggest, and yes you might have to change the plug to get the machine and the outlet compatible….but, there is a reason they rate electrical devices with an “operational” figure. If the saw is 15 amp rated you should not deliver more than required. It may be confusing because while the saw, when operating properly will only draw what it needs all is well and it wouldn t matter if you had it on a 200 amp circuit {in theory} it will still draw probably 9-10 on start up and 3-4 while running. Now, throw in a problem, like a short in the motor or switch and instead of tripping a breaker at 15 amps and stopping everything you still have 35 amps more before it trips…..what does all this mean? Well, you can start one heck of a fire and burn down the neighborhood with the extra amps now being delivered to the machine. You could also get shocked. You don t want to get hit with 220 anyway, but 15 amps or less is better than 50 for sure. It could also mean the difference between jamming the saw and tripping the proper breaker with no damage {15 amp breaker trips} or jamming the saw and blowing it up, getting you shocked and starting a fire {not tripping at 45 amps because you have a 50 amp breaker}.
For safety sake you really should run the proper rated circuits, you are not going to do that anyway, it cost money, I get it. I would suggest that you at least install the proper rated breakers.

- msinc

I m an electrical contractor and msinc summed it up perfectly! It s usually not that hard to do it the right way and you ll never have problems and have to worry about what could go wrong

- chrisirving

With all due respect, this is hogwash. I’ll explain:

The circuit breaker protects the wire.

The Motor must be protected by either a thermal breaker integral to the motor, or an external starting relay with an overload heater coil.

Even a 2HP motor on a 15A or 20A circuit is not “protected” by the circuit. It’s possible for an unprotected motor to be in a minor or moderate overload state for an extended period, without tripping the circuit breaker in the load center panel. This won’t make the motor catch fire right away, but it can rapidly degrade the winding insulation = dead motor.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

477 posts in 1303 days


#11 posted 08-14-2017 05:59 PM

Also, 15A or 50A, if you get shocked at 240V, it will hurt. as long as the amperage is above a few milliamps, it can cause damage.

220v is not a real thing. Please stop parroting this number.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#12 posted 08-14-2017 06:20 PM


With all due respect, this is hogwash. I ll explain:

The circuit breaker protects the wire.

The Motor must be protected by either a thermal breaker integral to the motor, or an external starting relay with an overload heater coil.

Even a 2HP motor on a 15A or 20A circuit is not “protected” by the circuit. It s possible for an unprotected motor to be in a minor or moderate overload state for an extended period, without tripping the circuit breaker in the load center panel. This won t make the motor catch fire right away, but it can rapidly degrade the winding insulation = dead motor.

- William Shelley

Yep, what Mr. Shelley said. You’d do well to make a pigtail that goes between the saw and outlet, and then have at it!

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4692 posts in 1554 days


#13 posted 08-14-2017 06:24 PM


Need advice on power amperage. Planning on purchasing new Sawstop 3 hp rated at 220v 15 amps. My shop is primarily wired with 220v 50 amp outlets for welders. Can i run my 220v 15 amp equipment on a 220v 50 amp circuit without any problems? I have been running a 220v 15amp air compressor on the 50amp circuit without any apparent issues. Just want to make surethis wold not harm the electricmotors

- Rolle2259

It will certainly run it and no, it wont hurt the motors. The issue is having 50 amps of power available to a machine that is rated for 15. No, it wont hurt it in a sense of “overdoing it” as the amperage suggest, and yes you might have to change the plug to get the machine and the outlet compatible….but, there is a reason they rate electrical devices with an “operational” figure. If the saw is 15 amp rated you should not deliver more than required. It may be confusing because while the saw, when operating properly will only draw what it needs all is well and it wouldn t matter if you had it on a 200 amp circuit {in theory} it will still draw probably 9-10 on start up and 3-4 while running. Now, throw in a problem, like a short in the motor or switch and instead of tripping a breaker at 15 amps and stopping everything you still have 35 amps more before it trips…..what does all this mean? Well, you can start one heck of a fire and burn down the neighborhood with the extra amps now being delivered to the machine. You could also get shocked. You don t want to get hit with 220 anyway, but 15 amps or less is better than 50 for sure. It could also mean the difference between jamming the saw and tripping the proper breaker with no damage {15 amp breaker trips} or jamming the saw and blowing it up, getting you shocked and starting a fire {not tripping at 45 amps because you have a 50 amp breaker}.
For safety sake you really should run the proper rated circuits, you are not going to do that anyway, it cost money, I get it. I would suggest that you at least install the proper rated breakers.

- msinc

I m an electrical contractor and msinc summed it up perfectly! It s usually not that hard to do it the right way and you ll never have problems and have to worry about what could go wrong

- chrisirving

With all due respect, this is hogwash. I ll explain:

The circuit breaker protects the wire.

The Motor must be protected by either a thermal breaker integral to the motor, or an external starting relay with an overload heater coil.

Even a 2HP motor on a 15A or 20A circuit is not “protected” by the circuit. It s possible for an unprotected motor to be in a minor or moderate overload state for an extended period, without tripping the circuit breaker in the load center panel. This won t make the motor catch fire right away, but it can rapidly degrade the winding insulation = dead motor.

- William Shelley


This is correct, the other options are not necessary. I have an alarm clock in my house (along with a few other things) plugged into a 20A circuit while only pulling ~15 watts (or 0.125A) and I have exactly zero intention of finding a a breaker with a load rating adequate to protect my alarm clock as that is not what the breaker is there to protect.

View msinc's profile

msinc

98 posts in 337 days


#14 posted 08-14-2017 06:48 PM

With all due respect, this is hogwash. I ll explain:

The circuit breaker protects the wire.**

- William Shelley

With all due respect THIS Is hogwash…..the circuit breaker protects the ENTIRE circuit. Period end of story.

To the OP, you can follow some of this advice of you want to, but it is not the safe way to do this. I would suggest you at least contact a licensed electrician and get another opinion. What some of these people are telling you to do will certainly allow your machine to run and you may not ever have a problem with it. Any licensed good electrician will tell you that two things are important in regards to what you are trying to do…the first is safety, if it was okay to do this the way some of these guys are suggesting then why isn’t it okay to do it this way as per NEC {National Electrical Code}???? And second, anyone who has ever had an electrical fire or even just a fire for that matter and been involved with having insurance adjusters/investigators on the scene will tell you that the slightest little NEC code infraction they can find will kill the claim. This means the insurance company WILL NOT PAY.
Run a 15 amp machine on a 50 amp circuit breaker being fed by #6 wire IS NOT CORRECT as per NEC code. I have trouble believing these people are telling you in writing to go ahead with this. Do as you wish.
I will standby while these guys quote the NEC code or codes that says it not a problem to wire up a 15 amp rated device on a 50 amp circuit.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

5978 posts in 2032 days


#15 posted 08-14-2017 06:53 PM

With all due respect THIS Is hogwash…..the circuit breaker protects the ENTIRE circuit.

Yup, and the circuit ends at the outlet. If you were hard-wiring a machine, then that would be an entirely different story.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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