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Storing finishes in corked glass jars

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Forum topic by metroplexchl posted 08-12-2017 08:30 PM 1137 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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metroplexchl

66 posts in 138 days


08-12-2017 08:30 PM

I searched the archives and didn’t find anything about this, but i was given a box of really cool looking glass jars with corked lids. Can I transfer all my solvents, stains, oils, etc into these and have them be stored safely and where they won’t go rancid? I live in Texas, so its damn hot and rarely gets below freezing. But I’m also curious about them being exposed to light.

thanks,

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln


9 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9608 posts in 3482 days


#1 posted 08-12-2017 09:48 PM

I think varnishes might be a bad idea as
the seal may not be tight enough. For solvents
and stains it’s probably okay. I’ve stored
that type of thing in screw-top jars for
years and haven’t noticed any evaporation.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1764 posts in 482 days


#2 posted 08-12-2017 10:12 PM

I’ve stored boiled linseed oil, turpentine, mineral spirits, shellac, stains, and denatured alcohol in corked glass containers for years … haven’t had any issues thus far. Not sure about the exposure to light, as my shop tends to be a bit dark.
 

 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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metroplexchl

66 posts in 138 days


#3 posted 08-12-2017 11:38 PM

Very cool. And if I remember correctly, Ron, isn’t your shop in GA and gets up to like 120 in there? Sounds like its pretty safe to me.

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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Rich

1976 posts in 424 days


#4 posted 08-13-2017 12:40 AM

Cork doesn’t seem airtight enough to me.

If I decant any finish, or mix dye, it’s usually put in a mason jar. They’re cheap and seal tightly. I also store my shellac cloths in one too and they never dry out, always ready to dip in the 1/2 and 1 lb cuts I keep ready, and wipe. Some things, like lacquer and the shellac cuts, are prone to seal the lid on, making it difficult to unscrew. For them, I buy empty quart paint cans.

For oil products, I use Bloxygen when I close the container. Even though the finish might look OK, oxygen will damage the product if you don’t isolate it.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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metroplexchl

66 posts in 138 days


#5 posted 08-13-2017 01:16 AM



....always ready to dip in the 1/2 and 1 lb cuts I keep ready, and wipe. Some things, like lacquer and the shellac cuts, are prone to seal the lid on…..

Please forgive my ignorance, but what are “cuts”? I assume either cut up rags or or different finishes that were “cut” or mixed?

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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Rich

1976 posts in 424 days


#6 posted 08-13-2017 01:26 AM

Chris, it’s cuts of shellac. A 1 lb cut is one pound of shellac flakes mixed in a gallon of denatured alcohol. A 2 lb cut is two pounds in a gallon, and so on. I’m not sure what the origin of the term is, but that’s what it means.

Just for convenience I buy cans of BullsEye Seal Coat shellac. Out of the can it’s a 2 lb cut, which is pretty heavy for general use. I take a pint of it and mix with a pint of denatured alcohol for a 1 lb cut and a cup of it mixed with three cups of alcohol for a 1/2 lb cut. Just so they’re handy when I need them, I pre-mix them and put them in empty quart paint cans from Home Depot.

The cloths I mentioned are just cut up cotton t-shirts that I use to wipe on the shellac. By storing them in a mason jar, they never dry out and will be good for years.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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metroplexchl

66 posts in 138 days


#7 posted 08-13-2017 01:47 AM

I see! Is there any way they can self combust like linseed oil rags? I’ve never seen them actually ctch fire but hear stories every year or two. Makes me wonder what else will…

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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Rich

1976 posts in 424 days


#8 posted 08-13-2017 01:55 AM

Not the shellac cloths. Shellac evaporates, it’s oxidation that causes combustion. Even then though, storing oily rags in a sealed container is safe, since it will consume the oxygen and the oxidation ceases.

It’s piles of oily rags that will combust because they have a ready supply of oxygen, and the density of the pile maintains heat. With heat comes more rapid oxidation producing even greater heat. That will continue until it gets hot enough to combust.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1764 posts in 482 days


#9 posted 08-13-2017 10:21 AM

 
That’s true … and again, no issues to date. I also keep cuts of shellac and tinted boiled linseed oil in plastic (Kroger) whipped honey containers!
 


Very cool. And if I remember correctly, Ron, isn t your shop in GA and gets up to like 120 in there? Sounds like its pretty safe to me.

- metroplexchl


I ve stored boiled linseed oil, turpentine, mineral spirits, shellac, stains, and denatured alcohol in corked glass containers for years … haven t had any issues thus far. Not sure about the exposure to light, as my shop tends to be a bit dark.
 

 

- Ron Aylor


-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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