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Bench top Dog holes

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Forum topic by CEY posted 08-11-2017 05:02 PM 508 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CEY

4 posts in 109 days


08-11-2017 05:02 PM

I hope to finish up a new workbench for my shop this weekend. I want to drill some bench dog holes opposite my vise, but can’t figure out how to get them perfectly vertical when all I have is a hand drill.

I have a drill press, but can’t position the head down low enough to where the bit will drill below the base.

Any ideas?

Chuck in NV


19 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4351 posts in 2071 days


#1 posted 08-11-2017 05:10 PM

I used my plunge router w/ a 3/4” straight bit to start the holes then finished them with a spade bit.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14493 posts in 2338 days


#2 posted 08-11-2017 05:14 PM

I’d suggest they don’t have to be perfect to work as holes for hold fasts or dogs, either one. I’m sure the holes in my bench top are not.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

336 posts in 896 days


#3 posted 08-11-2017 05:18 PM

+1 to what Smitty said. If you really want perfectly vertical, you could drill a perfectly vertical hole in some scrap using your drill press, then clamp that scrap to your bench with the hole in the scrap located where you intend to drill a hole in your bench. Use the “true vertical hole” in the scrap as a guide for drilling free-hand into your bench.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

14493 posts in 2338 days


#4 posted 08-11-2017 05:23 PM

^ That’s a fine suggestion!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View moke's profile

moke

977 posts in 2496 days


#5 posted 08-11-2017 05:38 PM

I drilled my first bench with a plunge router ( as deep as it would go)...finished them through with a spade…..they are perfect and nice….it took me forever.
I drilled my second bench with a “General” company fixture for the front of a hand drill that looked like a plunge router…it was quicker but still a little labor intensive for me…I used a forstner bit.

My neighbor asked for my help and We used the drill “fixture from General” to drill a hole maybe an inch deep and finished it off by hand with a second drill and operator and it was much quicker! We used a couple of Deming 3/4 drills ( Deming drills are 1/2 shank…you can buy them individually).....I found that my spade bit was a little light of 3/4…enough so the dogs fit rather tight.

I believe that was almost as accurate if not just as accurate…As Smitty said…I’m not sure its that critical to be perfect. I also put a very light chamfer on with my colt pony palm router.

Just my .02
Mike

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

7243 posts in 1870 days


#6 posted 08-11-2017 08:02 PM

If anything, it’s preferred to have a ~2 degree angle pointing towards the vice.

You can also use a DIY drilling jig. Fasten 2 boards together at a 90 deg angle and put it on it’s side. Use the corner as a guide to drill straight.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2632 posts in 1709 days


#7 posted 08-11-2017 08:45 PM

I used a 3/4” anger type bit that was long. I drilled a hole in a 3” block of hardwood on my drill press and the used it as a guide.

View John_H's profile

John_H

29 posts in 1426 days


#8 posted 08-13-2017 06:43 AM

How much money do you want to spend :)

Lee Valley sells Dog Hole Bushings and Bits that aren’t too expensive

Another option – I use this method when I want to make a “MFT” style top

I bought a Festool MFT replacement plate to use as a ‘template’. (Since you have a drill press, you could make something with just a couple of holes)

I clamp the ‘template’ to my work surface and using a drill bushing I purchased from McMaster Carr, I drill out the majority of the hole (Festool holes are 20mm in diameter)

After drilling – this is all I have left to remove:

A router with a 1/2” flush cutting pattern bit (bearing on top) is small enough to fit down through the hole (I don’t plunge it because I don’t want to screw up my template) and easily removes the rest of the material

View HorizontalMike's profile (online now)

HorizontalMike

7540 posts in 2634 days


#9 posted 08-13-2017 11:23 AM

Another similar home made jig for hand drilling dog holes. Only had an 8in drill press at the time, that was much too small for such a large project:


.
. Notice that I labeled the measured hole distances for a more uniform look, when drilling them with a hand drill. V—below—V

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View jonah's profile

jonah

1043 posts in 3019 days


#10 posted 08-13-2017 12:12 PM

There is no earthly reason why dog holes need to be straight in the first place, so don’t worry about it. Bench dogs or holdfasts work just fine in 87 or 93 degree holes.

View CEY's profile

CEY

4 posts in 109 days


#11 posted 08-13-2017 01:31 PM



There is no earthly reason why dog holes need to be straight in the first place, so don t worry about it. Bench dogs or holdfasts work just fine in 87 or 93 degree holes.

- jonah

Oh I guess I agree with that statement, but unfortunately I have a little OCD… LOL

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1433 posts in 368 days


#12 posted 08-13-2017 01:53 PM

I did my dog holes like this … between 11:47 AM and 12:33 PM every day for 3 months … all holes are 88.569° to 92.368° … works just fine!
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4548 posts in 2213 days


#13 posted 08-13-2017 03:34 PM

I’ve used a plunge router, but since I didn’t have a 3/4” bit that would drill holes, I used a 1/2” and then went back later with a fluted 3/4” to enlarge them. Took a while, doubt I’ll ever do that again. I bought the LV bushing for the last go around, and it really works well.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Andre's profile

Andre

1316 posts in 1526 days


#14 posted 08-13-2017 04:12 PM

Tried all the above methods with varying success and ended up using a hand brace, quickest and as accurate as needed for my Gramercy holdfasts. Put in a row of Veritas Prairie Dog for the tail vise and really like them.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1565 posts in 2529 days


#15 posted 08-14-2017 10:56 PM



I did my dog holes like this … between 11:47 AM and 12:33 PM every day for 3 months … all holes are 88.569° to 92.368° … works just fine!
 

Hahahahaha!!!

- Ron Aylor


showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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