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Forum topic by Firefighter posted 01-12-2011 02:56 AM 771 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Firefighter

96 posts in 2237 days


01-12-2011 02:56 AM

My wife would like a dresser and 2 nightstands inspired by this design for our master bedroom. I have never done any furniture that was not made up of straight lines. I think I could build these with a flat front, but was looking for some help and pointers to get the curved front. I will offer my ideas of what I was going to do and look forward to any advice you all have.

I was thinking of cutting the legs to only curve toward the ends of the pieces. I was going to cut a dado in the legs with a router and laminate several layers of thin plywood on a curved template to create the sides. The front of the legs and the drawer fronts was going to be flat, but I would prefer to learn how to match the inspiration pieces.

Lastly, I think this will be a distressed piece. I would like to stain it and then paint it and distress the paint. With this in mind (and budget being tight) what kind of wood should I consider. I don’t really want to spend more on wood than I need to for something that is going to be predominantly painted.

Thanks for all the help!


6 replies so far

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Firefighter

96 posts in 2237 days


#1 posted 01-12-2011 03:14 AM

I just found a good deal on some poplar and think that may be the perfect lumber for this project. Ideas?

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Nollie

146 posts in 2249 days


#2 posted 01-16-2011 07:56 AM

Poplar and milk paint !!

-- Nollie Bay City , Tx .http://www.leoncustomfurniture.com

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Jonathan

2608 posts in 2513 days


#3 posted 01-16-2011 06:04 PM

Poplar should work well for a project like this, especially if your budget is tight, and the fact that you’re more or less going to hide the wood with the finish you plan on using.

I just read through your original post twice and am not sure I understand your plan for the legs? Are the going to be straight where they contact the carcass, then curve below that?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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Firefighter

96 posts in 2237 days


#4 posted 01-20-2011 03:14 AM

Jonathan- For simplification lets say I want to build exactly what the picture shows. I am not sure how to curve the drawer fronts and the carcass front. Any ideas would be appreciated.

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Jonathan

2608 posts in 2513 days


#5 posted 01-20-2011 04:06 AM

So the legs you’ll obviously be cutting on the bandsaw. I would think you might want to get those cut to your liking first. Then you can base everything else off those four legs. Since all of the leg is curved, you won’t have a flat side to lay down on the bandsaw so you’ll want to piece it back together and tape it, make your next curved cut, piece it back together and tape it, etc.

Bent lamination, as you suggested, might be a good way to tackle the curved apron/side pieces, as well as the drawer front. Your curves are all the same, even if your sides aren’t the same width as the front and back, so you should be able to just use one form/jig for your bent glue-ups.

Another option would be to cut the curved front, back, and sides out of thick stock if your bandsaw is big enough to handle the size. If you try this route, I might suggest trying to get everything put together as quickly as possible to help minimize cupping, etc. The bent lamination would be a more stable way to go, in my opinion, and would probably be a bit more even throughout. If you did bandsaw the curves on the sides, etc. you’ll likely need to take some material off the back as well for evening out the moisture content of the wood.

I’m sure somebody else that has done a lot of curves might have a better idea.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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Jonathan

2608 posts in 2513 days


#6 posted 01-20-2011 04:11 AM

You could also cut the curves on the table saw, again out of your thick stock, whether a solid piece of wood, or a glued-up block. It would take quite a while, and you’d have a bit of scraping/shaving and sanding to do, but it could be done. Basically start in the center of the board and make yor deepest cut, then lower the blade slightly, then make another cut, turn the board 180-degrees and make the same height cut on the other side of the curve, lower the blade slightly, and repeat.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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