LumberJocks

Sharing insight into shoulder cuts on dovetails

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by Matt Vredenburg posted 08-10-2017 09:05 PM 2101 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Matt Vredenburg's profile

Matt Vredenburg

189 posts in 3192 days


08-10-2017 09:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: trick joining tip question

I have heard and read information about shoulder cuts on your tails for dovetails. I can’t find much information on what to do. I cut my dovetails by hand and would love to learn more about how to use shoulder cuts that help hide the inside joint. The master woodworker that mentions this a lot is Steve Latta.

Please share any insight and your learnings so I can start to leverage this additional technique.

-- Matt, Arizona


13 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1118 posts in 1576 days


#1 posted 08-10-2017 10:01 PM

Are you have trouble with cut on the tail board that’s shows on three sides?
Sometimes I just use my Dt saw to make this cut if I’m not feel 100 accurate I will cut on the waste side of the line and clean it up with a chisel.
The tail board is the one that get a scribe line all the way around all four sides.

-- Aj

View CL810's profile

CL810

3678 posts in 2766 days


#2 posted 08-10-2017 10:08 PM

Watch David Barron’s videos on YouTube. Also, make a paring jig.

-- "The only limits to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today." - FDR

View Matt Vredenburg's profile

Matt Vredenburg

189 posts in 3192 days


#3 posted 08-10-2017 11:57 PM

Thanks for your reply’s. I am pretty good at cutting dovetails by hand (the last ones are normally my best ones), however, Steve Latta recommends cutting a shoulder on the inside of the dovetail pins (i think?) which cleans up the inside of the drawer and I assume covers up an fit issues (sometimes I can see my saw cuts on the inside).

I will check out David Barron’s video as well. Thank you!

-- Matt, Arizona

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1118 posts in 1576 days


#4 posted 08-11-2017 01:38 AM

Oh yes I think I know what your taking about some woodworker like to have a shallow rebate on their half blind tail board.
Ive done once or twice its a extra step not needed.

-- Aj

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14723 posts in 2396 days


#5 posted 08-11-2017 03:19 PM

Chris Schwarz does this with a Veritas skew.

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/joinery/handplanes-and-dovetails

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View dbeck's profile

dbeck

43 posts in 137 days


#6 posted 08-11-2017 04:18 PM

Thanks for posting that link Smitty, it really helped me understand better.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14723 posts in 2396 days


#7 posted 08-11-2017 04:22 PM

No problem at all.

If you try it, the tool’s gotta be incredibly sharp. I tried it with a sharp #78, no go. Also, it’s gotta stay 100% level in the cut and not tear cross-grain. There’s certainly a learning curve to it; one that I’ve not opted to climb. Kudos to those that do, though.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View splinter1000's profile

splinter1000

13 posts in 1261 days


#8 posted 08-11-2017 08:07 PM

Rob Cosman sometimes does this also. You can see how here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIkwZFBbPHo

Cheers

View Matt Vredenburg's profile

Matt Vredenburg

189 posts in 3192 days


#9 posted 08-12-2017 06:07 AM

Smitty, thanks for sharing Chris’ article. I probably have that one, but it’s a stack of 10 years of magazines I have in my shop.

What Chris covers in the article is exactly what I was looking to do. Now I need to go try it out this weekend.

-- Matt, Arizona

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14723 posts in 2396 days


#10 posted 08-12-2017 02:22 PM

^ Pictures or it didn’t happen. :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5370 posts in 2591 days


#11 posted 08-12-2017 06:06 PM

I don’t use shoulders on dovetailed drawers, but find them extremely useful in case construction. The top rail of a cabinet is often joined to the case sides with a lapped DT joint. Cutting a shallow shoulder on the underside of the lapped DT helps with aligning the parts, and prevents racking too.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View TheFridge's profile (online now)

TheFridge

7915 posts in 1264 days


#12 posted 08-12-2017 06:23 PM

Yep. Just remember to do it before you cut tails. Otherwise you risk blowing out. Ask me how I know.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View lew's profile

lew

11757 posts in 3533 days


#13 posted 08-12-2017 07:36 PM

https://youtu.be/c01JexFF8_8

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com