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Forum topic by Bohaiboy posted 08-10-2017 05:23 PM 355 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bohaiboy

35 posts in 1511 days


08-10-2017 05:23 PM

So I am about to undertake a project that I could get by with a butt joint but I think the project warrants something much nicer in finishing. So I am making a door for a jewelry cabinet that will hold necklaces. It will be mounted on the side of the cabinet. The frame for the door is mesquite.

I have watched numerous videos and agree that I definitely need a setup block. The frames of the door will be 1/2”. What are the consequences, for those with experience, if the stock is say .515 or .495 and its outcome on the finished product?

-- Tim, Houston, TX area


15 replies so far

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Fred Hargis

4535 posts in 2210 days


#1 posted 08-10-2017 06:35 PM

It’s not the thickness, but the centering of the bit across whatever that dimension is. So I’d say as long as the pieces are consistent in thickness it shouldn’t matter.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Carloz

637 posts in 308 days


#2 posted 08-10-2017 06:49 PM

I am not sure why you meed a lock miter bit for this.

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Bohaiboy

35 posts in 1511 days


#3 posted 08-10-2017 08:15 PM

What would you recommend Carloz? Plain miters?

-- Tim, Houston, TX area

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RichTaylor

1305 posts in 306 days


#4 posted 08-10-2017 08:38 PM

First off, you don’t need a setup block. I just wrote a blog post yesterday that shows how to set up a lock miter bit easily by separating the bit height setup from the fence setup, so you’re not wrestling with two variables at once.

Second, I don’t think this is a good place to use a lock miter joint. The reason is that the lock miter pattern will be visible from the top. Instead, I’d do a spline miter joint. Do a web search for information on how to cut them and how to make a jig to cut the slots for the splines.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Bohaiboy

35 posts in 1511 days


#5 posted 08-11-2017 12:33 AM

I thought about splined miters, but I don’t want the splines to show on the front as this is set to give the appearance of the legs continuing to the top. Below is a look at the entire piece. Keep in mind this is a design in progress and will be tweaked a lot more. The two doors for the referenced miters are left and right and will hole necklaces. I want the appearance, even though there is a space, that the legs invisibly connect.

-- Tim, Houston, TX area

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Loren

9138 posts in 3365 days


#6 posted 08-11-2017 12:46 AM

Blind mitered slip joint.

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Bohaiboy

35 posts in 1511 days


#7 posted 08-11-2017 05:24 AM

Its beautiful, but maybe above my skill level.

-- Tim, Houston, TX area

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Carloz

637 posts in 308 days


#8 posted 08-12-2017 11:56 AM


What would you recommend Carloz? Plain miters?

- Bohaiboy


Tough luck. Lock miter will not work in this case. You could try biscuits but I am afraid the whole construction is very flimsy. No joint on that narrow frame will give you satisfactory results especially thay you cannot glue the panel to the frame. Which triggers a question why do you need the frame at all? Just use a simple glued up top. Rout some grooves along the edge if you want the look.

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splintergroup

1353 posts in 939 days


#9 posted 08-12-2017 02:13 PM

FWW a few months back had a technique for making stable frame/panel doors that lacked sufficient “beef” in the corners. Worth a look anyway.

There always is the stub tenon, bridal joint and corner spline which can be made a decorative element.

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Bohaiboy

35 posts in 1511 days


#10 posted 08-12-2017 06:11 PM

The frame is functional and will have a 1/2” glued in back in rabbets. That leaves 1-1/4” inside which will be used for necklaces. The frame will have hinges on the back for opening. It is not a fixed frame

-- Tim, Houston, TX area

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RichTaylor

1305 posts in 306 days


#11 posted 08-12-2017 06:24 PM



The frame is functional and will have a 1/2” glued in back in rabbets. That leaves 1-1/4” inside which will be used for necklaces. The frame will have hinges on the back for opening. It is not a fixed frame

- Bohaiboy

What’s the back made out of, Tim? If it’s wood, and glued into rabbets, no corner joint is going to hold. You’d need to be using plywood.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Bohaiboy

35 posts in 1511 days


#12 posted 08-12-2017 06:37 PM

Hi Rich. Yes plans were to rabbet 1/2” mesquite there. The end pieces will be 1.75” wide What are your thoughts on using a half blind dovetail to connect those pieces? Or could use pocket hole screws and no rabbet. Plywood is not an option on this piece.

-- Tim, Houston, TX area

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RichTaylor

1305 posts in 306 days


#13 posted 08-12-2017 06:43 PM



Hi Rich. Yes plans were to rabbet 1/2” mesquite there. The end pieces will be 1.75” wide What are your thoughts on using a half blind dovetail to connect those pieces? Or could use pocket hole screws and no rabbet. Plywood is not an option on this piece.

- Bohaiboy

A solid panel of mesquite, or any wood for that matter, is going to expand and contract enough to destroy any joint you use if it’s glued in like that. Panels need to float in a groove, unglued, and I don’t see any way you’re going to do that without having gaps.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Bohaiboy

35 posts in 1511 days


#14 posted 08-12-2017 07:31 PM

So would this work, I increase my width to 2”, have a floating 1/2” side panel, with groove inset 1/8-1/4” from the edge?

And thanks all for the feedback, this is a great forum and I learn a lot.

-- Tim, Houston, TX area

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RichTaylor

1305 posts in 306 days


#15 posted 08-12-2017 07:51 PM



So would this work, I increase my width to 2”, have a floating 1/2” side panel, with groove inset 1/8-1/4” from the edge?

And thanks all for the feedback, this is a great forum and I learn a lot.

- Bohaiboy

Yeah, it’s got to float. You can tack it with glue right in the center to hold it steady, but it needs to be able to expand and contract.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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