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Cross Cut Sled

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Forum topic by mangorockfish posted 08-10-2017 05:04 PM 649 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mangorockfish

18 posts in 186 days


08-10-2017 05:04 PM

I have really been researching cross cut sleds as of late. The one William Ng builds on You Tube seems like a very nice one, however I can’t decide whether to build one or buy a ready made one. Also, what size is most recommended? What is the opinion here? Thanks


12 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7656 posts in 2749 days


#1 posted 08-10-2017 05:12 PM

Do a LumberJocks search and you will fond much information there:

http://lumberjocks.com/search_results?cx=017914489645407774653%3Agwwk-zif3wk&cof=FORID%3A9&safe=high&q=crosscut+sleds&sa.x=0&sa.y=0

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Rich's profile

Rich

1977 posts in 425 days


#2 posted 08-10-2017 08:27 PM

I have three that all are simple, basic sleds. The one in the photo below can handle boards over 27” wide, I also have ones for boards up to 12” and 18”, so I don’t have to mess around with sleds larger than I need.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

100 posts in 476 days


#3 posted 08-10-2017 08:50 PM

Build one. If you don’t like it, you will learn a lot which will help you build – or buy – a better one next time.
And for your first crosscut sled, it’s not likely that you will need all the fancy features that are available.
Avoid analysis paralysis, go with a “minimal” design, build it and use it.

Size: Mine is about 15” deep and probably 36” wide, with most of the mass to the right of the blade.
The rails are about 3” high.

————

FWIW, I started with a largish scrap of ply I already had, ripped two 3” strips lengthwise, glued and screwed the back runner on (NOT critical to be square, it’s just for stability).
Glue and screw ONE miter slot runner on (still, NOT critical to be square!), set the sled on the saw, and attach the second miter slot.

Now raise the blade the thickness of the ply, and push the sled through once.

Now anchor one end of the front rail (this one will have to be square!) and use a framing square to get it nearly square to the blade. From here you can use a variety of methods and your own ingenuity to position it permanently, perfectly square to the blade.

Good luck!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View TaySC's profile

TaySC

270 posts in 169 days


#4 posted 08-10-2017 09:07 PM

Definitely build your own IMO.

View clin's profile

clin

751 posts in 831 days


#5 posted 08-10-2017 09:09 PM

Size depends on your needs. I don’t see the point of making one smaller then 12” deep. But I also have one that is over 32” deep. Just depends on what you plan to use it for. I would NOT make just a big one. Bigger is more awkward and they start to get a bit heavy. Big is great when you need it, but something smaller is easier to throw around for the common small stuff.

Also, unless you know you’re going to be doing a lot of miter cuts. I’d keep it simple as shown by Rich in the above photo.

And unless time is money for you, I’d build one.

-- Clin

View Andre's profile

Andre

1489 posts in 1641 days


#6 posted 08-10-2017 09:58 PM

Build, as said before don’t go to big unless you have a purpose for it!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

397 posts in 275 days


#7 posted 08-11-2017 12:18 AM

My sled overhangs the left side of my TS by about 2”. On the underside there, I have a stop block fastened to the sled and there is a stop block mounted on the edge of the saw table. When my cut is finished, the stop blocks hit together stopping my sled from moving any farther forward. On the sled there is also an overhang to cover the blade as it enters the final inches of the cut. The blade stays covered. I also built the back cross piece high enough that my fingers are safely away. Just some ideas to consider if you should build your own.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3645 posts in 2144 days


#8 posted 08-11-2017 12:25 AM

Like clin said, size is depend on what work you do with it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

704 posts in 694 days


#9 posted 08-11-2017 05:45 PM

Crosscut and more. This is a Nick Ferry designed sled. Obviously big, but thats what I wanted. Miter attachment and a tenon jig as well.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View Hermit's profile

Hermit

139 posts in 1161 days


#10 posted 08-11-2017 06:24 PM

I built mine the exact size as my table, not including the wings. If you have your table aligned with the blade perfectly it will make it easy to build your sled.

-- I'm like the farmer's duck. If it don't rain, I'll walk.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3645 posts in 2144 days


#11 posted 08-11-2017 06:41 PM

” I can’t decide whether to build one or buy a ready made one”

Who is selling ready made ones?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

704 posts in 694 days


#12 posted 08-11-2017 09:59 PM



” I can’t decide whether to build one or buy a ready made one”

Who is selling ready made ones?

- AlaskaGuy

Rockler, Incra, and I’m sure more.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

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