LumberJocks

Caring for a cast iron table saw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by agallant posted 01-11-2011 05:15 PM 1707 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View agallant's profile

agallant

429 posts in 1542 days


01-11-2011 05:15 PM

So I am about to make the plunge in to a 3HP saw stop (lets keep the conversation away from it actually being a saw stop, if I was smart I would just say 3HP saw but I am kinda interested to see who ‘that guy’ is going to be). Currently I have a ridgid table saw with a granite top, very low maintance. I do not heat or cool the shop unless I am in it. What steps do I need to take to keep the top of my soon to be new saw in nice shape? How do I keep it from rusting etc?

-AG


18 replies so far

View Robinson's profile

Robinson

30 posts in 1348 days


#1 posted 01-11-2011 05:25 PM

It is hard to beat the old original Johnson’s Paste Wax.

-- Francis Robinson, Central Indiana, USA - - Shopsmith fanatic

View agallant's profile

agallant

429 posts in 1542 days


#2 posted 01-11-2011 05:26 PM

Is i just that simple? Hell I use it on my granite top saw now to keep everything sliding nice and smooth.

-AG

View Dan's profile

Dan

3543 posts in 1536 days


#3 posted 01-11-2011 05:30 PM

I agree with the above. I just use Johnson’s paste wax. I apply a coat or two every few weeks or as needed. I have an older cast iron top saw that I had restored the top when I got it. So far I have had no rust show back up and the saw is in my garage, it gets wet.

Some people promote a spray on protector called Top Coat. I hear that works great also..

Don’t be afraid if you do get a few small spots of surface rust. Its rather easy to sand/buff out if you catch it early. Its bound to happen at some point.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

View wb8nbs's profile

wb8nbs

139 posts in 1348 days


#4 posted 01-11-2011 05:30 PM

I wax all my Iron tools with Butchers Bowling Alley Wax. Keeps the rust demon away and makes the surface Smoooooth. Just be sure to buff the wax good after a couple of minutes, lumps of paste wax get gummy and will rub off onto the wood interfering with some finishes. Do not use automotive wax or any other wax that contains silicone. That will surely screw up a wood finish.

-- The only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1887 days


#5 posted 01-11-2011 05:38 PM

Wax it, wax it, wax it… Not a table saw, but my bandsaw table paid a bit of a price for me not waxing often enough… Same with the lathe…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View agallant's profile

agallant

429 posts in 1542 days


#6 posted 01-11-2011 05:40 PM

So how often do I need to wax it? Also is there an issue with not keeping a constant temp in the shop?

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2401 posts in 1696 days


#7 posted 01-11-2011 05:44 PM

Here in OK we go from Below Zero to 100+, I only wax my saw top about 2-3 times a year, just when I am waxing something else & think it’s been a while since I did the saw.

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1838 days


#8 posted 01-11-2011 05:57 PM

I’ve used both wax and the spray on topcoat. I think the topcoat lasts a little longer but the wax is the cheapest. Sometimes low tech is the way to go!

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1706 days


#9 posted 01-11-2011 08:17 PM

I have used both Johnson’s Paste Wax and Top Coat. Between the two, I prefer the Top Coat. With that being said, I am going to be buying a new tablesaw soon, as I’ve sold my Powermatic 64A.

I will probably use the Top Coat or Renaissance Wax on the new tablesaw. The Renaissance wax is supposed to be much longer lasting than the Johnson’s. Yes, it’s more expensive, but you only need a little bit of it. Just build a couple of layers and you’re good. If you’re spending almost $3K on a TS, what’s a few dollars more for the protection going on top, right? The SawStop is powder coated too, so that will be good for most of the rest of the saw as far as longevity and not rusting.

Whatever you decide to go with, I second wb8nbs on making sure there is no silicone in the product as it’ll interfere with finishing the wood.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1706 days


#10 posted 01-11-2011 08:21 PM

Also, if you’re going to keep the saw covered, make sure the cover is breathable… basically don’t use a plastic sheet, or a plastic tarp, or anything lined with plastic.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

567 posts in 1668 days


#11 posted 01-11-2011 08:50 PM

I’ll second paste wax. I’ve heard you can also use what you use on your car …. if you ever polish that.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1887 days


#12 posted 01-11-2011 08:54 PM

Tyvekboy. Car wax is one of the last things you would want to use. Most car waxes use silicone, which can get into the pores of the lumber and ruin a finish in nothing flat…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View crank49's profile

crank49

3434 posts in 1626 days


#13 posted 01-11-2011 08:55 PM

Johnsons for me. Besides, I like the way it smells. It works so good, I can’t believe it’s not banned on the left coast.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1665 days


#14 posted 01-11-2011 09:01 PM

Those beautiful cast iron tables lose that factory finish quick! I developed all sorts of scratches on mine (in the 7 months I’ve had the saw), and a few small rust spots here and there that I have had a very hard time removing. Sort of makes me want to bust out all the sanding and buffing pads, but I’m OCD like that sometimes.

I didn’t get the top coat on fast enough when I first got the saw – maybe it would have prevented the little spots. T-9 Boeshield + paste wax (Renaissance if you feel like splurging) is a oft-recommended way to go, and the route I utlimately chose.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View Tim Gates's profile

Tim Gates

38 posts in 1699 days


#15 posted 01-11-2011 09:02 PM

Boeshield keeps demon rust away just fine in Louisiana. The humidity here is unbelievable.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase