LumberJocks

Cutting 1/32 strips from a 1x1?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Risk posted 08-09-2017 07:37 PM 500 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Risk's profile

Risk

3 posts in 125 days


08-09-2017 07:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: veneer resawing band saw table saw jewelry hardwood

Hey everyone, long time lurker first time questioner. :)

I make various types of wooden jewelry and am looking for a good way to take 1×1 blocks Pen Blanks and slicing off veneer thin or even thinner strips for bending.

I can hand plane a few hardwoods such as walnut and oak with consistently intact “chips”, sadly the more exotic woods like Teak, Cocabola, purpleheart, and burled shatter into flakes.

In the wood shop there’s a large table saw and a 14” band saw that looks to have lost a boxing match. :P The band saw’s table is askew which makes straight cutting neigh impossible. Plus i like my figures. :)

Any ideas on hardware that might be able to make these strips?
I was looking at 10” band saws, I hear the WEN 10” is great but hit with a sledgehammer frustrating setting up. Skil seems to get positive marks as well. Speed isn’t a factor as much as accuracy.

or would a 4” mini table saw work better? they only cut 15/16ths but a figure i could flip the piece and cut the last 1/16th.

I’ve even looked at those dokatsu(sp?) saws and perhaps making a jig up. :D

I really want to stay away for having to buy veneer, making my own strips is half the adventure. :)

-- "Nature is truely unique."


10 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5984 posts in 2033 days


#1 posted 08-09-2017 07:46 PM

The band saw’s table is askew which makes straight cutting neigh impossible.
- Risk

Band saw would be the safest way IMO… what exactly is wrong with the table? They are pretty easy machines to fix. Then you could rip them with a very simple fence (even just a 2×4 clamped to the table). You might also want to do a quick google search for ‘thin-rip jig’ for another alternative. You can purchase them from several places or make your own pretty easily. Work on a table saw as well.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

371 posts in 423 days


#2 posted 08-09-2017 08:18 PM

My TS with an incra will cut exact 1/32” slabs.

Come on over one afternoon and I’ll cut a bunch for you!

M

View unbob's profile

unbob

800 posts in 1738 days


#3 posted 08-10-2017 12:14 AM

For various reasons I often cut thin strips, I think I can get 1” depth using the regular freud 7 1/4” circular saw blades- thin kerf, and not too many teeth, using my 10” contractors saw with reasonable results.
I have made fixtures to do the same but much better on a shaper, but that’s another story.

View Risk's profile

Risk

3 posts in 125 days


#4 posted 08-10-2017 12:33 AM

The table saw we have also has the incra, problem though is the waste a table saw would eat up. Im hoping to get at least 10 1/32inch strips out of a 1 inch pen blank.
A standard table saw seems kind of overkill for such small pieces. Ill look into circular saw blades as well. :)


The band saw’s table is askew which makes straight cutting neigh impossible.
- Risk

Band saw would be the safest way IMO… what exactly is wrong with the table? They are pretty easy machines to fix. Then you could rip them with a very simple fence (even just a 2×4 clamped to the table). You might also want to do a quick google search for thin-rip jig for another alternative. You can purchase them from several places or make your own pretty easily. Work on a table saw as well.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

The table on the band saw looks to have been bent as if it fell some time in the past so its about 2-3% off on the x/z axis with the blade. Thanks for the term “Thin rip jig” was wracking my brain on what it was called. :)

-- "Nature is truely unique."

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5984 posts in 2033 days


#5 posted 08-10-2017 12:35 AM

The table on the band saw looks to have been bent as if it fell some time in the past so its about 2-3% off a square 90degrees with the blade.

The table is designed so it can be tilted left and right, so if that is the direction of the ‘tilt’, most likely it can easily be corrected. If it’s tilting front to back, then it’s not a problem.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View tomd's profile

tomd

2121 posts in 3605 days


#6 posted 08-10-2017 01:40 AM

A band saw is the safe way but you can do it with a table saw. Use a thin strip jig ( sold by Rockler ) a thin kerf blade and with a piece that small I would Hot glue it to a larger board then you could cut it safely. The thin strip jig will give you constituent pieces and they fall off to the outside of the blade so your not getting them caught between the fence and the blade, also you will want a zero clearance throat plate.

-- Tom D

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7779 posts in 2632 days


#7 posted 08-10-2017 05:34 AM

Any table saw, zero clearance insert, and a good push shoe. Rip the strips against the fence. No jigs required.
Safe and accurate.
https://youtu.be/RLNhCJ1Qn64

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

88 posts in 869 days


#8 posted 08-10-2017 10:21 AM

For something the size of a pen blank just use a hand saw.

Should be pretty easy to make a jig similar to whatever the 90 degree bit in a mitre box is called with a block 1/32 to the side.

-- I've worked out how to sharpen, now how do you get blood out of pine?

View Risk's profile

Risk

3 posts in 125 days


#9 posted 08-10-2017 06:54 PM



The table on the band saw looks to have been bent as if it fell some time in the past so its about 2-3% off a square 90degrees with the blade.

The table is designed so it can be tilted left and right, so if that is the direction of the tilt , most likely it can easily be corrected. If it s tilting front to back, then it s not a problem.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

The table is level with the floor, but bent on the y axis (the vertical axis) by about 3 degrees so a fence attached to it would would not be parallel with the blade. Still works fine for freehand cutting but doesn’t do a good job with precision long cuts.

That’s why i was thinking of picking up a new one.

Definetly looking into those thin kerf blades and thanks for the youtube vid.

Thanks for all the ideas folks, these are helping tons!

-- "Nature is truely unique."

View Loren's profile

Loren

9610 posts in 3482 days


#10 posted 08-10-2017 07:02 PM

Band saw trunnions and tables tend to
be made of cast iron so the don’t often
bend, they break. I would take it apart
to see where the problem actually is.

In any case the cut can also be made on
a table saw. A steel “planer blade” can
make pretty clean cuts and won’t consume
as much of the stock as kerf waste. For
a small amount of work steel blades stay
sharp adequately. I have a printer’s type
saw I use for small precision cuts. It uses
steel blades and I’ve been surprised at
how well the last.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com