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Forum topic by mike123789 posted 08-09-2017 05:13 PM 532 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mike123789

11 posts in 300 days


08-09-2017 05:13 PM

I have started making butcher blocks and i love it! but I always run into issue with the second glue up. I mill my own wood and go through all the normal processes. everything is sexy and straight and square. After the first glue up has set, I plane the board, then i move to the cross cut sled and cut pieces to size. I put them in the clamps, rotate every other and then it occurs to me. all my pieces have a gap in the middle, as if they were bowed when they came out of the planer cupped. It happens constantly. 5 out of the last 6 boards. Sometimes its light enough that the clamps can negate 90% but other times the clamps cant do it leaving me with ugly gaps that must be filled. any help would be appreciated.


14 replies so far

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mahdee

3829 posts in 1607 days


#1 posted 08-09-2017 05:35 PM

The bowing is normal occurrence. Not being able to clamp the gap shot is suspect. What kind of clamps are you using? How thick are the strips? What kind of wood? Sorry for asking too many questions; just trying to troubleshoot your problem.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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mike123789

11 posts in 300 days


#2 posted 08-09-2017 06:23 PM

I use primarily walnut, Jatoba, maple and wenge. all of which have had the problem. I use 3/4 and 1/2 bar clamps. my boards are 1.5 to 2.25 inches thick. the gap between is usually 1/16 to 1/8 and in some extreme cases closer to a 1/4 off.

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buckbuster31

203 posts in 355 days


#3 posted 08-09-2017 06:44 PM

that’s a pretty big gap. I am also surprised it cant be brought together….

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Gilley23

396 posts in 222 days


#4 posted 08-09-2017 09:59 PM

I’d be interested to see if there would be a difference if you used pipe clamps or parallel clamps and cauls. Do you use cauls with your bar clamps? When you say “bar” clamps, is that the same as an F clamp?

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Aj2

1179 posts in 1638 days


#5 posted 08-09-2017 10:43 PM

My guess is your wood is reacting to the glue or the new moisture to its surface.
The fix for my guess is to acclimate longer after the first glue up or cut your cross cut pieces twice.
The first cut could be done on a bandsaw and the second on your tablesaw.
Does this make sense

-- Aj

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3391 posts in 3736 days


#6 posted 08-10-2017 12:06 AM

Have you run a straight edge over your planed board to see if there is a gap prior to making your second cut? That I think would be the first thing to check.

It’s also possible, I’m not sure if it’s valid or not, but after you plane your boards are they warm or hot to the touch? There’s a possibility that heat may be part of the issue. As AJ said, it may be an acclimation issue.

Then when you get to the second cut, lay each strip flat on the table top to see if it’s bowed. Do that with each piece and identify which pieces the bow starts at.

Those are thoughts off the top of my head -

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

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mike123789

11 posts in 300 days


#7 posted 08-10-2017 01:03 PM

i appreciate the thoughts guys. I use pipe clamps. sorry for the confusion. no cauls.
After planing my pieces appear fine. I put a 5 foot or a 3 foot aluminum tubing straight edge and all appears fine.
as far as acclimation is concerned, all kiln dried and I have had all the wood I am currently working on in my shop for no less than 6 months.
wood out of the planer feels warm.
regarding the glue, I am using either titebond 2 or 3. this last board was 2.

My milling process is also on par. from jointer, to saw, to planer. all flat, sexy and ready. my issue comes after glue up and second cut. I checked my saw, parallel and 90. and my crosscut is a whopping .003 out over 22 inches. I let the glue set for 24 hours. after the glue up should I remove from the clamps and let it sit for a time before taking it to the crosscut perhaps? this is beyond aggravating. being a novice with no formal teaching I’m sure I’m missing something.

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mahdee

3829 posts in 1607 days


#8 posted 08-10-2017 01:28 PM

The bowing is not due to plane, saw,etc because you are not gluing the surfaces together just the cuts, right?
Assuming you are not planing the cut pieces before gluing them, I have no idea why this is happening. I would not force clamp these boards because for sure they will develop cracks later on. There is no need to plane the cut surfaces prior to gluing the strips.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Aj2

1179 posts in 1638 days


#9 posted 08-10-2017 02:00 PM

Oh yeah let the wood sit longer before you start cross cutting them.Since you just added moisture back in the wood and it’s just at the surface.
Also try cross cutting from the middle out this should change the way your blank reacts .
You will probably find the thicker your final piece is the more stable.
My end grain boards are Hardmaple with very little accents and I shoot for 2 inch thick.The wood will still move after each cut. Hope this helps

Try not to be influenced by what other do in their YouTube videos and look to the wood for guidance. :)

-- Aj

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mike123789

11 posts in 300 days


#10 posted 08-10-2017 02:36 PM

mahdee. this is occurring just before the second glue up after I have cut and turned the pieces 90 degrees.

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mahdee

3829 posts in 1607 days


#11 posted 08-10-2017 05:44 PM

I really can’t fathom how it could happen. One thing you might try is to glue 4 or 5 strips at the time and then assemble the whole thing. That way, at least you may have to deal with 2 or 3 sections at the time.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4482 posts in 2191 days


#12 posted 08-10-2017 07:11 PM

Show us a picture of your second glue-up in the clamps, showing the gaps.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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mike123789

11 posts in 300 days


#13 posted 08-14-2017 04:29 PM

I FIGURED IT OUT!!! damnedest thing too. after checking a piece of cherry i ran through the planer over and over i noticed something amiss. one of my planer guards had thrown a screw. that being said wood debris had gathered under one small portion of one blade. scalloping every so often leaving some spots perfect and others dipped in quite a bit. causing lots of issues.

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BurlyBob

5068 posts in 2105 days


#14 posted 08-14-2017 07:48 PM

Isn’t is amazing how a little thing can throw you a curve and make you question yourself? Good you found the problem out so soon.

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