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Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 01-10-2011 07:48 PM 1770 views 2 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


01-10-2011 07:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw guide bearings adjusting bandsaw

This is a real palm-slap-to-the-forehead deal from my friend George Blackman:

When it’s time to change the blade on your bandsaw and therefore adjust the bearings,

take the table off.

Loosen and remove the two adjusting knobs and the top will lift right off. Duh.

Now you can adjust all six bearings and keep the blade perfectly straight. It’s amazingly simple, profoundly helpful, and it calls into question my fundamental intelligence which never even considered this. It brings to mind that old sketch where Steve Allen says to Bill Dana, “You wouldn’t change a tire while the car was rolling would you?” And he answers, “Not any more!”

Also you can note in the picture that there is a small brush over in the left margin there to keep the lower tire clean. Works well, easy to do.

Final note: These bearings in my bandsaws just don’t last very long. Is it the nasty environment, or am I missing something else?

I always keep a complete set on hand for each of my saws. Nothing can ruin a little bandsaw time faster than a howling banshee blade guide.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


14 replies so far

View sawblade1's profile

sawblade1

754 posts in 2493 days


#1 posted 01-10-2011 08:08 PM

Thank for the neat tip :)

-- Proverbs Ch:3 vs 5,6,7 Trust in the lord with all thine heart and lean not unto your own understanding but in all your ways aknowledge him and he shall direct your path elmerthomas81@neo.rr.com

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blackcherry

3313 posts in 3289 days


#2 posted 01-10-2011 08:12 PM

Dang that head slap hurt…lol , that just to simple. Great tip Lee also I notice your using the lower bearing with the Carter Stablizer, this is not recommended…WC

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#3 posted 01-10-2011 08:31 PM

Blackcherry, help me understand that—What am I doing that’s not recommended?

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2540 days


#4 posted 01-10-2011 09:28 PM

I need to try this. Getting the lower bearings properly set has always been a challenge for me. This will probably help.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3200 days


#5 posted 01-10-2011 09:58 PM

I wondered about this too, and then blackcherry mentioned it: I don’t see any upper lateral guide bearings or blocks on either side of the blade, just what appears to be two back-stop bearings….could we have another view, please? Maybe that’s why the two lower side-bearings are failing…they do the work of four?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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blackcherry

3313 posts in 3289 days


#6 posted 01-10-2011 10:40 PM

Hey Lee, when using the Carter Stablizer with saw blade 1/4 inch and small , also no larger than 1/4 blade should be used with the Stablizer. The lower guide bearing should not be used. Most people just push them back so they no longer enclose the blade, or you can remove them but that not necessary. Then when you tension the blade so it ride in the slot of the Stablizer you should move the stablizer forward toward the user slightly about 1/32 , this will spring load the blade in the slot so when you back out of cuts the blade will not come out of the slot. If you have any other question please PM me and we could talk over the phone. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5EexhzUmXL4

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4808 posts in 2640 days


#7 posted 01-10-2011 10:43 PM

For the “nasty environment,” and the toll it takes on ball-bearing-based bearings, you may want to consider ceramic bearings, as an option:

http://www.hartvilletool.com/product/11206

Their main advantage IS supposed to be their resistance to gum-up.

-- -- Neil

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blackcherry

3313 posts in 3289 days


#8 posted 01-10-2011 10:52 PM

Pooiekat, when using the Carter Stablizer you will remove the standard top bearing and place the Carter Stablizer in place. This Stablizer is only used with 1/4 blades and smaller, then the lower bearing are push back and lock out of the way. This in turn converse you band saw into a scroll saw. When using blades larger than 1/4” you must use the original top and lower blade guides to in case the blade. Hope this help if not check out the Carter Stablizer on utube for a demo.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5EexhzUmXL4

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#9 posted 01-10-2011 11:23 PM

First, let’s get some terminology consistent here. According to one manual I have, the bearing in the back behind the blade is the support bearing. 2 per saw.

The bearings that flank the blade are called guide bearings, 4 per saw.

So from watching the very helpful video, and blackcherry’s post, I need to remove the lower guide bearings and support bearing when I’m using the Carter Stabilizer on a blade 1/4 or less (1/4 is what you see in the image).

(Video guy says, “no bearings at all below.”)

The Carter fits in the housing for the upper guide bearings, so they’re obviously gone.

He doesn’t mention the upper support bearing, but it can sit there at idle because the blade is pulled off it.

Blackcherry and the video disagree on the forward offset. Former says 1/32; the video says 1/8. Perhaps one finds one’s own sweet spot there.

The demonstration in the oak is quite compelling. There is no mention of his blade tension however.

Anyway, my takeaway here is very helpful: Remove the lower guide bearings, pull the Carter forward slightly, and check the tracking on the upper wheel.

Do I have all I need?

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3313 posts in 3289 days


#10 posted 01-10-2011 11:36 PM

You got it Lee, the upper support bearing can be set back as far as possible and should not come into play as well. You are only using the Carter Stablizer. Also got to check out your bass guitar it remarkable, craftsmanship and sound is just way cool.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#11 posted 01-10-2011 11:43 PM

Thanks for the kind words about the instrument, blackcherry. It’s been quite an adventure!

The larger lesson in all this: Learn about the Gizmo.

I found the Carter piece on ebay several years ago, was the only bidder, and I got it for a song and I didn’t even need to learn the bass part. But I never researched the wheel, I just put it in the bandsaw, all eager dumb and happy, and let ‘er spin.

I’ll be a little more intentional next time, and I am really in your debt for helping me get the most out of this little rolling beauty.

Lumberjocks kicks it between the goalposts once again! (which might be a way of saying, “Go Ducks.”)

Thanks kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Chris Moran's profile

Chris Moran

15 posts in 2589 days


#12 posted 01-11-2011 12:01 AM

Thanks for the post Lee.
OMFG that video blows me away. I don’t intend on buying the stabilizer – not in my periphery – but I hope with a new set of blades, I can pull off cuts like that, that easily. Am I mistaken in thinking I could see the blade actually turning while he was cutting? I’ve only tried cutting curves with my 3/8” crap blade and while it did turn a lot (not as much a that looked), it certainly didn’t help.

Anyway, yeah, taking the table off when I make the change is one thing holding me back right now, since it’s pretty cold in the garage for gloveless operation right now (Vermont). :)

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blackcherry

3313 posts in 3289 days


#13 posted 01-11-2011 12:22 AM

I’ll be routing for the Ducks as well !!!!!!!!!!!

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1117 posts in 2526 days


#14 posted 01-11-2011 02:10 AM

I never had problem adjusting the bearing on both top and bottom with table on (Grizzly G0555P). But I did it once before by taking the table off, put on the blade and adjust it. Then table on, it didn’t work for me.

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