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Tips for NOT sanding after a Glue Up

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Forum topic by BentheViking posted 08-08-2017 11:36 PM 3078 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BentheViking

1782 posts in 2769 days


08-08-2017 11:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip pine clamp sanding finishing rustic

I am doing a glue up soon of some 1×6 pine with a rough sawn face on one side. The rough sawn face will be the shown side and will be stained. I do lots of glue ups and usually use biscuits to keep it together and then sand and plane it smooth. Since I want to maintain the roughness I obviously can’t sand. I am thinking of abandoning the biscuits on this one since it might be easier to keep the front face even and I think the project is small enough I have enough clamps. I’m also worried about how to keep glue off the finished face since (A) I won’t be able to sand and (B) I don’t want the glue to sit on those spots and cause the stain to take unevenly in those spots.

Any tips for this would be great. I like the rough finish on this project and its a present for someone so I am really hoping it turns out well.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson


30 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16281 posts in 4423 days


#1 posted 08-08-2017 11:57 PM

I’ve had success letting the glue dry about 90%, then scraping off the squeeze out with a sharp chisel.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3853 days


#2 posted 08-08-2017 11:59 PM

You might consider using plastic resin
glue. It dries hard and brown and squeeze
out can be scraped off when dry.

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BentheViking

1782 posts in 2769 days


#3 posted 08-09-2017 12:07 AM

Without sacrificing the integrity of the joint is there a way to get it so all the squeeze out is on the back side of the piece rather than the face?

Loren is there a specific brand or anything you recommend on it? I’m sure I’ve seen it before, but don’t know for sure based off of that. Usually I use Titebond II

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

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chrisstef

17766 posts in 3211 days


#4 posted 08-09-2017 12:08 AM

Stain it first then glue it?

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

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shipwright

8166 posts in 3003 days


#5 posted 08-09-2017 12:10 AM

Even scraping will smooth your rough sawn surface somewhat. Hide glue can be completely cleaned up with only water and won’t block your stain if you get it all off.
Unless it is for outdoor use where it will be subject to soaking it might be your best bet. Old Brown Glue will give you lots of open time.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Loren

10477 posts in 3853 days


#6 posted 08-09-2017 12:13 AM

Shipwright has a good point about hide glue.

I use Weldwood plastic resin glue, when I use
it. It comes in powdered form and is available
at hardware stores.

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BentheViking

1782 posts in 2769 days


#7 posted 08-09-2017 12:34 AM

The thought of staining it before glue up had never even occurred to me. Could be a big risk big reward type thing. I suppose if I have any glue on top and have to remove I can do some stain touch up. Has anyone stained before gluing up before?

I don’t think I’d let glue get completely hard before trying to scrape it off. I know how I work and I have a feeling I’d get quickly frustrated and mar the surface. It will be an indoor project, so no worry about water and its a pretty small glue up (only two 3’ long edge joints) so I don’t need a crazy amount of working time.

I’ve never used hide glue before. Is that different than the plastic resin that Loren suggested? What would be the reason I’d want to use one of these over Titebond II?

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View Rich's profile

Rich

3895 posts in 794 days


#8 posted 08-09-2017 01:13 AM

If you can tape it carefully enough, then the squeeze out will lift off. Also, Loren’s suggestion for plastic resin glue is good, not only because it cleans up easily, but it’s much more stain friendly than PVA. If you get right on it after glue up with a sponge and bucket of warm water you’ll be all set. I use DAP Weldwood. It comes as a powder that will keep indefinitely, and all you do is mix it with water. I usually use more glue than the directions say to get a thicker result that doesn’t run as much.

Another great choice would be liquid hide glue. It too is very stain friendly and it will wash clean with warm water even after it dries.

Of all of them, I most highly recommend liquid hide glue. I make my own, but if you’re going to use it, get Old Brown Glue. It’s the real thing, just hide glue, urea and water.

Edit: I was typing when Paul posted his LHG recommendation, but he’s right. It will solve your dilemma.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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BentheViking

1782 posts in 2769 days


#9 posted 08-09-2017 01:21 AM

Since I am going to have to lay the project flat on the floor since my bench is too small I’m thinking that if I lay it with the rough face down then the glue will drip onto the floor rather than pooling up if I were to have the rough side facing up?

Also how tight should I really be clamping. I don’t have a jointer so usually I am clamping pretty tight to get the joint as seamless as possible (I don’t usually use anything this wide so not sure if it will be more or less of an issue), but as you crank down it usually causes more glue to seep. I don’t want the joint to fall apart (though it will have little stress on it over time), but maybe I don’t actually have to go that hard to still get something solid?

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View jdmaher's profile

jdmaher

439 posts in 2784 days


#10 posted 08-09-2017 03:00 AM

Liquid Hide Glue. I use Titebond (which is readily available), but Old Brown is fine, too.

I have a nice rip blade that really does seem to give me a glue ready edge. I dry fit to make sure, and re-rip if necessary (though it almost never is). Usually, I coat one edge down the middle and spread evenly with a brush. The I rub the two edges together and clamp it up.

For me, the trick is always keeping the faces even while clamping. Show side UP, light clamp, then go back to each clamp in sequence and press down the high side and tighten a bit ‘til the glue seems to quit oozing out (don’t need to be all THAT tight). You’ll have loads of time (45 minutes), so don’t worry about moving fast; its worth spending the time to even up the faces.

I always clean up glue squeeze out right after clamping with a damp rag. It ain’t gonna dilute the glue IN the joint. I do let it stay in the clamps at least over night. With the clamps off, I use a wet-ish rag to wipe off any remaining glue; just rub a moment or two and it’ll come off.

Now, the backside may still need some sanding to even up the faces. With rough-sawn, thickness probably isn’t consistent for the whole board. Show side is what matters, right?

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

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TheFridge

10763 posts in 1691 days


#11 posted 08-09-2017 03:12 AM

I wouldn’t use anything but hide glue (OBG for open time) on it in that case.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5094 posts in 2556 days


#12 posted 08-09-2017 04:02 AM

Hide glue is a great idea and I would very carefully apply glue to only the back half of the joint to minimize squeeze out on the front side.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1782 posts in 2769 days


#13 posted 08-09-2017 12:05 PM

I am still missing the point of what about the hide glue is going to give me an advantage over TB2 besides open time.

Also does anyone have any suggestions as to local stores to get Titebond Liquid Hide Glue? Home Depot and Lowe’s don’t appear to sell it. I have Woodcraft, but its not that close and would prefer not going out of the way. I can actually order it in through my store, but it will take about a week to come in, and I was hoping to glue this weekend.

One other thing I thought of that may help with a lot of this is to do a shiplap joint on the boards rather than the square edge. That would help with keeping glue on the back side of the joint. I could also do it with a nickel gap between the planks which would help minimize any level differences between the planks (Though I think I’d prefer not to do this). The final size of the project really doesn’t matter so I am not worried about losing a little bit of surface to the joints if it makes the glueing and finishing easier.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

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bondogaposis

5094 posts in 2556 days


#14 posted 08-09-2017 01:18 PM

Also does anyone have any suggestions as to local stores to get Titebond Liquid Hide Glue?

Ace Hardware.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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jdmaher

439 posts in 2784 days


#15 posted 08-09-2017 01:28 PM

Advantage of Liquid Hide Glue is cleanup. AFTER the glue has cured, you can STILL clean it up with a wet rag and rubbing. You can’t do that with regular Titebond (or 2 or 3). With Liquid Hide Glue, you don’t have to sand or chisel or scrape away any excess dried glue; just rub with a warm wet-ish rag.

My Ace has the Titebond Liquid Hide Glue.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

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