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Question about thickness planer? Why is it taking multiple passes?

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Forum topic by lumberdad1980 posted 08-08-2017 05:36 PM 679 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lumberdad1980

16 posts in 137 days


08-08-2017 05:36 PM

Hi!

I’ve literally only used a thickness planer since about 2 days ago. Its a used Belsaw 9103 and I spent a little time cleaning it up, oil some areas, adjusting the rollers and waxing the bed.

I’ve noticed if I set a thickness it goes through the machine and if I put it back in takes more off a few more times.

Why would it continue to take more wood off in multiple passes instead of one passes if I have the thickness set at a constant level?

Thanks!


10 replies so far

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

909 posts in 1396 days


#1 posted 08-08-2017 07:20 PM

Is there a lock to prevent the adjustment from creeping? On some planers it’s best to adjust down to the thickness vs. adjusting up to the thickness due to looseness in the adjustment mechanism. As the planer runs the cutter head may settle in the downward direction from vibration.

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

397 posts in 274 days


#2 posted 08-08-2017 07:30 PM

Might be that the blades need sharpened?

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

531 posts in 323 days


#3 posted 08-08-2017 07:38 PM



Is there a lock to prevent the adjustment from creeping? On some planers it s best to adjust down to the thickness vs. adjusting up to the thickness due to looseness in the adjustment mechanism. As the planer runs the cutter head may settle in the downward direction from vibration.

- WhyMe

Could be backlash as suggested. Check with a dial caliper to see how much its taking with each pass.

That might help you figure out what to check next.

Good luck

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1694 posts in 1057 days


#4 posted 08-08-2017 07:47 PM

Also consider “spring-back”. The wood gets slightly compressed by the blade before getting chopped off (remember those 2-blade face shaver animations?).

A repeated pass will get a second cut on these compressed fibers.

Mitigation of this effect would be sharp blades and of course be sure the head adjustment is truly locked down.

View lumberdad1980's profile

lumberdad1980

16 posts in 137 days


#5 posted 08-08-2017 08:33 PM

I’m wondering if the blades are dull and that is why? I’m getting tear out and its only pine that I’m planing so far.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3203 days


#6 posted 08-08-2017 09:17 PM

Pine is problem #1…...too soft. Tear out sounds like dull blades or trying to take too much per pass. Check for play in the cutter head.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1694 posts in 1057 days


#7 posted 08-09-2017 03:22 PM

I forgot to also mention that a planer produces an “undulating” surface like waves on the water (the nature of the beast). A second pass will most likely be cutting off the tops of the waves from the previous cut, although the planer should sound like it is barely contacting the wood.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2710 posts in 1315 days


#8 posted 08-09-2017 03:48 PM

I don’t think dull blades would cause this – well maybe if they’re extremely dull.

I’m with WhyMe. I’m thinking something is causing the bed to creep up???? (If anything I would think it would creep down.)

Its an old machine there could be a missing part.

I would start by checking knife sharpness + see if there’s slack the gears that rotate the bed height screws.

I suggest trying vintagemachinery.org

Brad, where are you? :-)

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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lumberdad1980

16 posts in 137 days


#9 posted 08-10-2017 01:56 AM

I have a little more insight on this now that I have something to compare it to.

Assuming jointer knives and planer knives are supposed to be equally as sharp: The blades on my used jointer that I acquired earlier today are many times sharper than the planer knives in the belsaw. I ordered some new blades and a planer knife jig and we’ll see how it goes.

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lumberdad1980

16 posts in 137 days


#10 posted 08-12-2017 03:23 AM

Also…

I checked the height of the old installed planer blades (with a jig) and they are about double the height that the manufacturer says they should be at….I’d imagine this could contribute?

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