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Forum topic by unclearthur posted 08-08-2017 07:17 AM 432 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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unclearthur

120 posts in 1621 days


08-08-2017 07:17 AM

A general question about applying a varnish finish by brush to both sides of a project For example, I’m going to brush on polyurethane to finish both sides of a footboard for a bed. I want both sides to look good.

I’m curious which is the best approach,

i) Brush on one side, flip it resting on “painters pyramids” or similiar, do the other side, and try to fix the marks later – in my experience the hidden bottom side always comes out looking rough (droplets, etc).

ii) Hold or hang it vertically and do both sides at same time – negative is having to worry about runs on the vertical surfaces ….. ie – easier to finish horizontal surfaces

iii) do one side, let dry, flip, do other side. But this takes 2 x as long and maybe have a line where the two sides meet?

Thanks for your thoughts …..


6 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#1 posted 08-08-2017 02:04 PM

I’ve never had any luck using the painters pyramids with varnish. It’s not the fastest, but I would let one side set up, and then flip it. The other way i do may not work for you, but I’ll put screws or nails into unseen spots and use them to support the piece, that allows me to rotate it before the top side has dried. If you elect to go the pyramid route, I’d suggest you make your own using very fine nails for the resting points.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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bbasiaga

1003 posts in 1829 days


#2 posted 08-08-2017 02:38 PM

You can also spray it while it is standing up, if you have the equipment. Go light and it will not run.

Otherwise, you’ve got to do the flip method. I have started using faster drying finishes in conjunction with spraying to cut down finishing time. You could go with a shellac base coat to get some color, then a water based topcoat. Shellac dries in 15min. The water based topcoat are hard and durable and dry in an hour or two depending on humidity.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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bobkberg

439 posts in 2907 days


#3 posted 08-11-2017 05:20 AM

Lately, I’ve been using the wipe-on poly, and have zero drip/run problems. The downside is that to get a decent gloss takes more coats. If I want a really high gloss, then I use a sprayer and a light coat.

For both sides, I make hooks out of coat hangers and staple the hook to the underside (or other non-critical surface).

Good luck,

Bob

-- Bob www.singularengineering.com - A sideline, not how I earn a living

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TungOil

741 posts in 329 days


#4 posted 08-11-2017 07:36 PM

Same here, I gave up trying to brush poly. I either wipe small items or spray.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Manitario

2551 posts in 2716 days


#5 posted 08-11-2017 08:10 PM

I agree with what others have said, every time I brush varnish I say “never again”. Wipe on might need more coats but is far simpler to get a good result.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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buckbuster31

198 posts in 349 days


#6 posted 08-11-2017 09:04 PM

wipe on only for me

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