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Forum topic by bear2 posted 08-07-2017 07:45 PM 543 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bear2

17 posts in 3009 days


08-07-2017 07:45 PM

Which is needed first a joiner or a planer?

-- It isn't always about being fast or even accurate that counts, it's being willing


12 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9602 posts in 3481 days


#1 posted 08-07-2017 07:51 PM

Depends on what type of work you intend
to do. The planer saves an enormous
amount of labor, but both the jointer and
planer are substitutes for hand planes. If
you don’t have hand planes, then many
functions of the jointer and planer are
very difficult to do in any other way.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1138 posts in 1057 days


#2 posted 08-07-2017 08:03 PM

You can get away with not having a jointer with a sled for the planer to face joint lumber and also some kind of jig to straight-line an edge.

Having both though, can make things go a lot faster.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

327 posts in 792 days


#3 posted 08-07-2017 09:50 PM



Depends on what type of work you intend
to do. The planer saves an enormous
amount of labor, but both the jointer and
planer are substitutes for hand planes. If
you don t have hand planes, then many
functions of the jointer and planer are
very difficult to do in any other way.

- Loren

Substitutes?

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

333 posts in 718 days


#4 posted 08-07-2017 10:20 PM

I’ve always advocated that a beginning woodworker should get a jointer first. It makes gluing up panels much easier by jointing board edges. It can give you square lumber up to the jointer’s capacity (with some limitations). It can also taper and rabbet, though I’ve never rabbeted a board on the jointer. Tapering on the jointer is an acquired skill.

The other use of a jointer is to clean up sawn board edges prior to assembly.

There is one reasonably good substitute for a jointer (besides the obvious hand plane) and that is a shaper with a straight cutter and an extended fence. It will joint the edges of boards if set up accurately.

As long as you are happy working with standard lumber dimensions, the planer is not critical.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

740 posts in 328 days


#5 posted 08-08-2017 02:36 AM

+1 on getting the jointer first. You can purchase S2S lumber planed to the thickness you need from your lumber dealer for just a slight premium over rough sawn. You will need the jointer to clean up ripped edges.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

119 posts in 354 days


#6 posted 08-08-2017 03:55 AM

Planer. You can make sleds to flatten one side and there are many ways to true up an edge, Router Table, straight edge and circ saw.

View Julian's profile

Julian

1234 posts in 2523 days


#7 posted 08-08-2017 03:27 PM

A planer for the reasons mentioned above. A good saw blade will give you a edge that is good enough for gluing.

-- Julian

View Notw's profile

Notw

594 posts in 1586 days


#8 posted 08-08-2017 04:28 PM

+1 for Planer

View RogR's profile

RogR

107 posts in 698 days


#9 posted 08-08-2017 07:23 PM

The purpose of a jointer is to prepare the wood for the planer. Without it you cannot be assured of two flat and parallel faces.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/41052

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1171 posts in 1631 days


#10 posted 08-08-2017 07:29 PM

Jointer first why do you guys want to teach a new woodworker how to cut corners.

-- Aj

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

327 posts in 792 days


#11 posted 08-08-2017 09:43 PM


The purpose of a jointer is to prepare the wood for the planer. Without it you cannot be assured of two flat and parallel faces.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/41052

- RogR


You mean planer, not jointer first


Jointer first why do you guys want to teach a new woodworker how to cut corners.

- Aj2

How is it cutting corners?

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

740 posts in 328 days


#12 posted 08-08-2017 10:22 PM

It may depend on the preferred workflow. My workflow has the jointer first, not the planer. Goes like this, I would imagine that some others have a very similar workflow as well. This assumes rough cut stock (surfaced no sides).

1) rough cut to length (radial arm/miter sawl)
2) straighten one edge (jointer)
3) for very wide stock I may rough rip to width, perhaps 1/4 oversize (TS). This helps with the next step
4) flatten one face (jointer)
5) final thickness (planer)

Then I move on to final dimensioning cuts:

6) final CTL (radial arm/chop saw)
7) If needed, re-joint the previously jointed edge, only if stress relief from the previous cuts has allowed a hook
8) rip to final width +1/32” (TS)
9) clean up the final cut with a 1/32” pass (jointer)

This workflow can be simplified greatly by buying S2S lumber and eliminating the planer, but you will need to carefully select material to avoid boards with any significant cup/bow. The workflow for me would simplify to:

1) rough cut to length (radial arm/miter sawl)
2) straighten one edge (jointer)
3) rip slightly oversize (TS)

Then I move on to final dimensioning cuts:

4) final CTL (radial arm/chop saw)
5) If needed, re-joint the previously jointed edge, only if stress relief from the previous cuts has allowed a hook
6) rip to final width +1/32” (TS)
7) clean up the final cut with a 1/32” pass (jointer)

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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