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How to joint w/o a jointer?

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Forum topic by newbiewoodworker posted 01-09-2011 09:41 PM 1811 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2490 days


01-09-2011 09:41 PM

I am trying to finish up my bench. Of course.. homedepot lumber is never straight…. this board set was no exception…. now I have to figure out: How do I take a bow out of a board? I want the top to be flush with the side boards… and a big honking lump doesnt help any.

I tried planing it out…but tis not very effective.

Any ideas?

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."


16 replies so far

View Gatsby1923's profile

Gatsby1923

39 posts in 2801 days


#1 posted 01-09-2011 11:56 PM

Hey, Long before I had a jointer I did a few different things. Face Jointing (flattening) your only options are either some kind of router jig, like the one’s used to flatten a workbench top, or hand planes. I grew up with hand planes so that is how I flattened faces. Edge Jointing I did three different ways. I’d try and get an edge strait by ripping on a table saw, then hitting the edge with a pass or two of a jointer plane. I would cheat and clamp a fence onto the plane to help keep it square. Another option I’d use on smaller boards was to do it with my router table.

-- I don't know where I'm going but I'm on my way!

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1566 posts in 3424 days


#2 posted 01-09-2011 11:57 PM

A lot of us in woodworking are “rediscovering” hand planes. Many shops are not large enough to easily accomodate a large jointer.

I’ll admit that Chris Schwarz, the editor of “Popular Woodworking” has been a big influence. His new book, “Handplane Essentials” is very informative.

Another plus is that there are literally millions of old Stanley/Bailey planes “out there” at reasonable cost, just waiting for someone to pick them up to apply a little TLC, and put them back to good use.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2586 days


#3 posted 01-10-2011 01:07 AM

If this is the boards you previously mentioned in another post, maybe you can put the one with a bow in it in the middle and put cleats across the bottom side and draw it down with screws.

-- Life is good.

View newbiewoodworker's profile

newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2490 days


#4 posted 01-10-2011 01:15 AM

Nah, these are going to trim out the edges of the bench.. so there is no middle.. :( I doubt I can draw 5.5 solid inches of wood down with just screws…. maybe a 50 tonne press…. lol…

Ima try the TS method… but my grandfather things that it will follow the bow.. will it? I would rather not have it follow the bow…since that means none other than… wait for it…. kickback…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View CampD's profile

CampD

1555 posts in 3149 days


#5 posted 01-10-2011 01:35 AM

If you have some plywood handy, rip a piece to the same width as the warped board, then attach the warped board to the plywood with the warped part overhanging the ply. Run the good edge of the ply against the fence and their you have it. Attach it with either double sided tape or if you are going to have extra width to the board, use screws.

-- Doug...

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2490 days


#6 posted 01-10-2011 01:43 AM

Good Idea!.. thanks… I do have some cutoffs from my bench top… one might be big enough… and its for a bench, so I might tack it with 2 Brads…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View Mark's profile

Mark

1801 posts in 2937 days


#7 posted 01-10-2011 01:59 AM

i do a method like campd does only i use a small strip ripped ooff another board…i put the edge right up against a level and i brad nail the strip on the board on the side where the level is…that way the strip is true and straight and when you run it through the ts it makes one side true…then i remove the strip and put the straight edge aginst the fence and then u have two straight n true edges

-- M.K.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9756 posts in 3716 days


#8 posted 01-10-2011 02:05 AM

Here is a way that I have done it.

It worked really very well… You would want the workpiece with the BOW up… set the router depth to hit the low edges… Run the router back n forth until all that you can do is done then, unclamp & move the jig to a new section of the board… repeat till done…

Now, turn it over, flattened side DOWN, adjust router dept to hit the low in the middle, and do the same thing as before flattening the side… When done, you have a coplanar board… Now you can square the sides ripping on the table saw.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Zuki's profile

Zuki

1404 posts in 3740 days


#9 posted 01-10-2011 02:22 AM

This is the method I use for edge jointing.

http://lumberjocks.com/Zuki/blog/19879

Almost forgot . . . you will get better success jointing shorter boards. I believe I read somewhere that the board should be no longer than 2 – 3 times the length of the fence. I initially jointed a 8ft length but had to rejoint the shorter pieces prior to assembly.

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki

View D_Allen's profile

D_Allen

495 posts in 2447 days


#10 posted 01-10-2011 03:34 AM

I too use a router and split fence as a jointer. Have for over a year and actually, I don’t think I need a jointer at this point. I just today milled some boards for a project and the longest is about 39”. With practice it can be done well.

-- Website is finally up and running....www.woodandwrite.com

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9756 posts in 3716 days


#11 posted 01-10-2011 03:49 AM

That works for the edges… but hard to flatten a board with it… :)

I took a 1×6 board to a friends place that had a good jointer.

I jointed both edges…

Then, with the cutting depth about 1/32” I ran one edge HALFWAY through & pulled it away…
I now have two edges on the same side 1/32” apart…

We adjusted the jointer to a dept of 1/16” and I did the other edge the same way!

Now, I have a Jointer board with two settings built-in! 1/32” and 1/16”

With a straight bit in the router table, I route a hole for it to go into at the EXACT spot where the two cut edges meet (in the center)... Then, I adjust the OUTFEED edge (one farthest away from the bit) to be flush with the bit.
Now, I’m ready edge-joint!

The board is marked up to indicate Depth and In/Out feed directions.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View D_Allen's profile

D_Allen

495 posts in 2447 days


#12 posted 01-10-2011 04:31 AM

I flatten my boards with my planer using a carrier board that holds the rough lumber with hot melt glue and shims.
Once one side is flat I use that side down to do the other side.

-- Website is finally up and running....www.woodandwrite.com

View jim C's profile

jim C

1471 posts in 2762 days


#13 posted 01-10-2011 05:26 AM

Put the board on a flat surface with the bow up. Take playing cards, use them as shims, and slide them under the board, in the center, until you stack enough to fill the bow gap.
Now take scotch tape and adhere them to the center bottom. Now draw pencil marks on top, and you can run the board through the planer, taking a little off at a time, until the marks disappear. Flip the board over, remove the cards and plane it parallel.
Piece of cake.

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2586 days


#14 posted 01-10-2011 11:29 AM

you can move a mountain with a simple screw

-- Life is good.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2673 posts in 3101 days


#15 posted 01-10-2011 12:59 PM

As long as the boards aren’t too long, you can clamp them together and plane both edges at once. When you are done and they are both even with each other, unclamp them and open them together from the bottom so both planed edges are touching. They won’t necessarily be straight but they’ll be complementary to each other and have a tight glue joint. This is the method we use to plane two guitar sides or backs so they fit together tightly.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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