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Grizzly Table Saw Blade Spin Down*Updated 8/11/17*

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Forum topic by seturner posted 08-06-2017 03:59 PM 897 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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seturner

29 posts in 255 days


08-06-2017 03:59 PM

Hello,

I recently purchased a used Grizzly 1023RLW with 3hp motor. It replaced a nice Delta contractors saw with 1-1/2hp motor. I noticed that my Grizzly has a very long spin down for the blade after powering down, I would say twice as long as the Delta.

Is a long spin down normal on this type of saw? Is there supposed to be a brake of sorts? I would estimate it takes 15 seconds to stop spinning after turning off.

Thanks

Edit: Added video. Startup squeal, power off at 10 seconds, blade stop at 37 seconds. This is after I tightened belt, which took time to stop from 31 seconds to 27 seconds.

UPDATE 8/8/17

I pulled the arbor and bearings today. The bearing furthest from blade was essentially frozen, and the other one was gritty. I bought some new SKF bearings and installed, but I damaged the threads on the arbor like an idiot by hammering on the arbor shaft directly. I think it will be cheaper to buy a new arbor than buying dies, since one end(away from blade) is reverse threaded fine pitch, and the blade side is right hand threaded coarse pitch.

Thanks for your help, and I believe Mr. Unix had it right all along.

UPDATE 8/11/17

Got the new arbor today and installed with the new bearings. The blade now stops in 12 seconds!

https://youtu.be/cz85ptoWIL0

View on YouTube


32 replies so far

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MrUnix

5991 posts in 2035 days


#1 posted 08-06-2017 04:21 PM

No brake… but an unusually long spin down time can indicate bad bearings. Typical spin down time with a standard blade should be about 5-7 seconds give or take a few. You might also want to take a look at the belt tension.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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seturner

29 posts in 255 days


#2 posted 08-06-2017 04:31 PM

I just went out and timed it with watch. From the time I press Stop button to blade motionless is 31 seconds, which is worse than I said.

The saw seems to run smoothly, their is a short squeal when I first start it, like a belt noise.

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Andre

1492 posts in 1642 days


#3 posted 08-06-2017 04:40 PM

I would think good bearings and perhaps belt just a little loose causing slippage on startup?
Think about bandsaws, large cast wheels take forever to stop turning hence the addition of foot brakes!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Rich

1978 posts in 425 days


#4 posted 08-06-2017 04:41 PM



No brake… but an unusually long spin down time can indicate bad bearings. Typical spin down time with a standard blade should be about 5-7 seconds give or take a few. You might also want to take a look at the belt tension.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Not arguing with you, but how would bad bearings increase the time to spin down?

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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MrUnix

5991 posts in 2035 days


#5 posted 08-06-2017 05:22 PM

Not arguing with you, but how would bad bearings increase the time to spin down?
- RichTaylor

Good bearings, with proper grease, have some resistance to spinning… if you take one and hold it by it’s inner race and spin it, it will free spin maybe once or twice but no more. Once the grease goes away (or turns to wax), you can do the same and it will free spin a lot. If you have a used machine, there is no telling when (or if) those bearings have ever been changed. They do not last forever.

I don’t know how many times I’ve heard people say “I spin them and they spin forever, so they must be good!”. Doh!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Rich

1978 posts in 425 days


#6 posted 08-06-2017 05:30 PM



Good bearings, with proper grease, have some resistance to spinning…

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

OK, thanks. That makes sense now that you explain it.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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unbob

800 posts in 1739 days


#7 posted 08-06-2017 06:53 PM

I have a Delta with the 1 1/2hp motor, it has an effective internal brake, the saw shudders a little when the switch is turned to off.
Other motors like the 1 1/2hp motor in my Griz jointer. takes longer to spin down. The brake is a safety feature
Dry bearings are most noticeable in radial saws, can take a long time to spin down.

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MrUnix

5991 posts in 2035 days


#8 posted 08-06-2017 07:01 PM

I have a Delta with the 1 1/2hp motor, it has an effective internal brake, the saw shudders a little when the switch is turned to off.
- unbob

I don’t believe I have ever seen a Delta TS that had a brake… What model saw, and is it an aftermarket braking system? Or are you talking about the centrifugal switch closing down (which many people confuse with a brake as it does slow the motor down a bit when engaged)?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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JackDuren

331 posts in 796 days


#9 posted 08-06-2017 07:14 PM

Call Grizzly…

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Rick_M

10619 posts in 2216 days


#10 posted 08-06-2017 07:22 PM

30 seconds does seem like a long time. I would check belt tension. Lot of people own Grizzly, might add “Grizzly” to the title and get more responses.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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unbob

800 posts in 1739 days


#11 posted 08-07-2017 12:33 AM

<blockquo>


I have a Delta with the 1 1/2hp motor, it has an effective internal brake, the saw shudders a little when the switch is turned to off.
- unbob

I don t believe I have ever seen a Delta TS that had a brake… What model saw, and is it an aftermarket braking system? Or are you talking about the centrifugal switch closing down (which many people confuse with a brake as it does slow the motor down a bit when engaged)?

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

The saw is a 1979 Rockwell 10” contractors saw, with the original Rockwell 1 1/2hp motor. I have read others thinking something is wrong with their motor, when the switch is flipped off the, saw shudders from the braking action as it slows down.

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MrUnix

5991 posts in 2035 days


#12 posted 08-07-2017 12:39 AM

The saw is a 1979 Rockwell 10” contractors saw, with the original Rockwell 1 1/2hp motor. I have read others thinking something is wrong with their motor, when the switch is flipped off the, saw shudders from the braking action as it slows down.
- unbob

That is pretty typical on a single phase induction motor – as the centrifugal switch closes and the start windings/capacitor are brought back into circuit (combined with the friction induced from the centrifugal switch itself)... and it’s exaggerated on machines with the motor hanging out the back. It’s not a brake, but many confuse it as such :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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TungOil

746 posts in 331 days


#13 posted 08-07-2017 01:33 AM

my 3 hp Powermatic takes nearly that long to spin down as well. Larger motors carry more inertia and take longer to stop. In addition, check the belt tightness. If you are getting belt squeal on start up your belt is too loose, which will (counterintuitively) reduce the friction in the system allowing it to spin down longer.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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MrUnix

5991 posts in 2035 days


#14 posted 08-07-2017 01:58 AM

my 3 hp Powermatic takes nearly that long to spin down as well.
- TungOil

31 seconds? That is excessive. My 3hp Baldor takes about 7-8 seconds to come to a stop – and it’s a three phase motor, which will usually take a bit longer than a single phase one. You can see it here.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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TungOil

746 posts in 331 days


#15 posted 08-07-2017 02:11 AM

In my experience a single phase motor typically weighs more that a comparable 3 phase motor. The extra weight is in the armature, which gives it more inertia, so all other things being equal it will spin longer.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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