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Runout and Deflection

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Forum topic by Hockey posted 08-06-2017 02:34 PM 518 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hockey

90 posts in 247 days


08-06-2017 02:34 PM

I tend to be overly susceptable to expecting perfection (almost) from my woodworking tool as though they were metal working tools.

With that said, how many of you actually measure runout of your lathe spindle without any thing on it?

How many of you also check deflection of the spindle (side to side play by moderate sideways pressure on the end of the spindle)?

If you are one of those that that does either or both, please tell us what your acceptable tolerances are. If either one of the above is out of tolerance, what is the cause? Thanks.


13 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#1 posted 08-06-2017 03:15 PM

I have done it by hand and with a dial indicator (in & outside) and my lathe spindle right on the money. Won’t try again unless see or feel something that makes me worry.

-- Bill

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5328 posts in 3498 days


#2 posted 08-06-2017 03:21 PM


I have done it by hand and with a dial indicator (in & outside) and my lathe spindle right on the money. Won’t try again unless see or feel something that makes me worry.

- Wildwood

Ditto. I checked my lathe with a dial indicator when I got it (2+ years ago) and have had no reason to check again.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1565 days


#3 posted 08-06-2017 04:01 PM

Both Bill and The Dane are accurate in their responses. Unless you did something catastrophic, no need to check it. Now, If you just got the lathe, check it. It seems up to .003-.004” is within tolerance. After that, it’s your call.

That said, after roughing a piece, and remounting it in the chuck, my experience is 95% of my turnings are not concentric any longer. I have to return the outside again.

I’ve seen all the descriptions on how to make sure your tail stock is aligned with the head stock by bringing up the tailstock point to the headstock point, usually spur and live center. What happens when the tailstock is 30” from the spur, or headstock. How do you check that alignment?

Also, perfection is not a word woodworkers should use because the wood itself will not allow anyone to achieve perfection…..... ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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MrUnix

5985 posts in 2033 days


#4 posted 08-06-2017 04:27 PM

I do it for my metal turning lathes, as that is how you set and check the condition of the spindle bearings. For wood ones, a few thou doesn’t mean squat. If you can’t see it, it won’t hurt :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10610 posts in 2215 days


#5 posted 08-06-2017 06:04 PM

I’ve done it and have a video about testing run-out with shop made anti seize washers. But I don’t get too worried about tolerances because turned wood moves like crazy. If I stop for a break, it’s out of round when I come back.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

90 posts in 247 days


#6 posted 08-06-2017 06:22 PM

Thanks for all the great responses. If I am measuring correctly, with nothing mounted to the spindle, I have no perceptible runnout on mine, measured on the inside of the morse taper.

I was also curious about deflection (not sure if that is the proper term). If I push on the side of the spindle with the indicator on the inside of the morse taper, I get very slight movement side to side. Don’t know if it is just the headstock itself, bearing, or the spindle moving or if is even an issue of any kind.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4697 posts in 1555 days


#7 posted 08-06-2017 06:23 PM

My inspections are the same as Brad’s. One thing to remember is many home (and industrial) woodworking machines are belt driven and with the belts still installed and under tension, completely trashed bearings can offer little to no movement with “moderate sideways pressure” as the belts are already applying substantial radial force ( not pressure ). Older manuals, particularly for large machine from Delta, Rockwell & the like, used to offer detailed specifications far beyond what comes with most of the disposable so called machines from many manufactured today. If you don’t have a spec to measure, it’s just guessing, some folks may be able to apply a little experience to have a pretty good idea of what they should be looking for but that still isn’t as good as measuring the factory spec.

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

90 posts in 247 days


#8 posted 08-06-2017 09:12 PM

Bigblockyeti, I know what you mean about manufacturers not providing runout specs in their manuals. To the contrary, Harbor Freight (Central Machinery) does spell it out: “Spindle Run Out” at only .0025. It is the small 10×18 (#65343) which is actually pretty impressive. I had one that only had a runout of around a 1/4 thousandth (.00025). That is significantly less than the spec, if I measured correctly.

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1578 posts in 2597 days


#9 posted 08-07-2017 05:05 PM

Spindle runout is not a serious problem with a wood lathe, as the wood will move while turning, or after it has been finished and taken off the lathe. Metal turning lathes are a different story, as the finished object MUST be accurate to within a thousands of an inch for installation – such as a bearing journal. I doubt very seriously anybody can get a turned wooden object within these tolerances. So, unless your lathe has a serious visible wobble, don’t worry about it.

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected !

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

90 posts in 247 days


#10 posted 08-07-2017 08:03 PM

Jimbo4, no wobble, and no noticeable runout on my lathe. Thanks.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2890 posts in 1823 days


#11 posted 08-07-2017 08:22 PM

I agree with the comments about run out on a wood lathe. I use a Shopsmith 5XX for a wood lathe and there is very little run out.

On the other hand, my Jet floor model drill press became a problem with run out of 0.005 -0.010”. Not too bad but had a lot quill slop that was a couple times that. I sold it for a pretty low price and bought one with much better specs and you can actually tighten the quill to reduce slop.

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

90 posts in 247 days


#12 posted 08-08-2017 12:21 AM



I agree with the comments about run out on a wood lathe. I use a Shopsmith 5XX for a wood lathe and there is very little run out.

...

- Redoak49

I recently turned a bowl on my old Shopsmith 10ER. I was impressed with the way the Shopsmith operated as a lathe. Mine has very little runout as well. I have a speed changer on mine so that I can get the rpms down to, according to the specs, about 425rpm.

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

334 posts in 720 days


#13 posted 08-08-2017 02:53 AM

I have a metal lathe too, so I don’t worry about runout on the wood lathe. If I need accuracy, I just step across the room…

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

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