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Forum topic by CharlesNeil posted 08-05-2017 12:31 PM 547 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesNeil

2143 posts in 3706 days


08-05-2017 12:31 PM

get so many emails on this decided to do a short video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgFzzZd0JVI&t=29s


17 replies so far

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Redoak49

2891 posts in 1824 days


#1 posted 08-05-2017 01:01 PM

Thanks for the video…..short and to the point.

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a1Jim

116566 posts in 3413 days


#2 posted 08-05-2017 01:11 PM

Thanks Charles

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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a1Jim

116566 posts in 3413 days


#3 posted 08-05-2017 02:34 PM

Again Thanks

You turned me on to dyes a long time ago, If I may add, don’t go so heavy that you get drips on the underside of what your dying that makes for extra work when you’re ready to dye the other side, I learned from personal experience when I first started using dyes.

Charles, Just wondering what those wedges were on all of the corners of the table were for in the video?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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CharlesNeil

2143 posts in 3706 days


#4 posted 08-05-2017 02:38 PM

Jim ,

this table has “company” boards ..you will see in the Mastering woodworking show ,The wedges act to make the company boards lift up on the end so they sit level .. this as the bottom of the table .. once the company boards are added it will be 11 ft long … FYI ..Company Boards slide in on the end of the table

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Rich

1977 posts in 425 days


#5 posted 08-05-2017 03:08 PM

Thanks for sharing. I watched it last night after it popped up on your Facebook page. Regarding spraying dye in general — on smaller pieces, do you still saturate the surface and wipe, or do you ever dial the gun back and “airbrush” it to build up the amount of color you want?

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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CharlesNeil

2143 posts in 3706 days


#6 posted 08-05-2017 03:18 PM

Rich I often dial the fluid back and up the pressure and ” do light dust coats , to get to the desired color, but if your not careful you can get “zebra stripes, ” i always do a light coat one direction then the other,, its called a cross hatch . backing off the distance to the the wood and dusting it on works the best .
Sounds like another video for another day .
In this case with the tiger maple, you want to get it wet so the soft curl can get as much dye as possible and when you wipe it back that pulls some of the dye off the hard grain , and that really enhances the figure in other words tiger maple is a blotch that happens to be attractive and you want to blotch it as much as possible

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Rich

1977 posts in 425 days


#7 posted 08-05-2017 03:29 PM



Sounds like another video for another day .

- CharlesNeil

New videos from you are always a welcome sight. I’ve got some lacewood trays that I want to color with TransFast dye. The trays are ready, and I’m going to be prepping some test boards this morning. We’ll see how it goes.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Monte Pittman

27063 posts in 2173 days


#8 posted 08-05-2017 05:12 PM

Awesome. I see doing this in my future.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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Joe Lyddon

9979 posts in 3888 days


#9 posted 08-05-2017 05:20 PM

Charles, Thank you AGAIN for sharing your great wisdom with us!

You are a true friend to us Woodworkers! :)

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1050 days


#10 posted 08-05-2017 09:22 PM

I really enjoyed both this video and the one on company boards- they were helpful to me; thanks.

-- Desert_Woodworker

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Carloz

966 posts in 427 days


#11 posted 08-05-2017 09:51 PM

That’s what I needed when I used dyes on a table first time. I had to resand it 4 times until I got the results I was after.
Now I have another big project and I will have to finish parts in different times. Like first fully finish raised panels for the doors. Then assemble the doors, sand seams and finish stiles and rails and so on.
I wander if I get the same color if I do not do it at the same time.
I am using Fuji 4 stage turbine for the reference.

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bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2902 days


#12 posted 08-06-2017 12:29 AM

Great one. I learned most of my finishing from your vid’s and DVD’s I have not used stains in years. Remember doing a bed, and the bed post was not right after spraying dye. Sanded it off did it again, was perfect. Thanks again for sharing.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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tinnman65

1348 posts in 3249 days


#13 posted 08-06-2017 01:52 AM

Thanks for posting another very informative video. I always look forward to your videos.

-- Paul--- Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep. — Scott Adams

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TungOil

745 posts in 330 days


#14 posted 08-06-2017 03:52 AM

Great video and your timing is perfect Charles, I’ll be finishing my dining table within the next few weeks starting with GF water based dyes. I will definitely use this technique. Thanks!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Rich

1977 posts in 425 days


#15 posted 08-06-2017 06:06 AM

So, Charles, I guess I’ll have to wait for your video on dust coats…lol. I sprayed my test boards today and they got pretty danged wet. The upside is that they got nicely saturated, and wiped down to a perfectly even color.

Always learning.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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