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question about drying a stump before carving

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Forum topic by metroplexchl posted 08-05-2017 01:29 AM 772 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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metroplexchl

66 posts in 141 days


08-05-2017 01:29 AM

I saw a man cut a stump and then use hand tools to carve a large bowl. It’s obviously time lapsed, but can one just grab a newly cut stump or log and start carving it? Or do you have to let it dry out for a while first? I fear that cutting a bowl out a newly cut log would cause the bowl to split or crack once it dried.

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln


13 replies so far

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GR8HUNTER

2963 posts in 550 days


#1 posted 08-05-2017 02:49 AM

most logs will crack …if not all …:<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Loren

9628 posts in 3485 days


#2 posted 08-05-2017 04:25 AM

In that sort of application you really have
to remove most of the wood from the
form while still green. Then it is left to
dry out and brought to final shape when
dry.

The reason is that the outside of a log
shrinks as it dries and it is forced against
the inside layers which won’t compress
enough for the outside to resist cracking.

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metroplexchl

66 posts in 141 days


#3 posted 08-05-2017 05:27 AM



In that sort of application you really have
to remove most of the wood from the
form while still green. Then it is left to
dry out and brought to final shape when
dry.

The reason is that the outside of a log
shrinks as it dries and it is forced against
the inside layers which won t compress
enough for the outside to resist cracking.

excellent explanation. So is it better to wait until the entire log or stump is dry and then make the bowl….or mke it while green and then dry it?

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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Loren

9628 posts in 3485 days


#4 posted 08-05-2017 05:34 AM

It will crack badly if the center is not mostly
removed early after it is cut from the tree.
So make the bowl while green. You can
wait until it is dry and remove more material
if you want. Dry and green wood work
very differently.

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Wildwood

2186 posts in 1972 days


#5 posted 08-05-2017 10:46 AM

Rough carving green wood to a uniform thickness say 1” will allow the wood to dry in a couple months and ready for final carving.

Lot depends upon diameter of a stump, wood species, style or design, and removing the pith. Close grain dense wood dries slower than open grain wood.

So splitting the stump in half, removing the pith with chain saw or craving it away beofore carving will reduce splitting or craking.

Wood turners do this all the time.

-- Bill

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mike02130

167 posts in 510 days


#6 posted 08-05-2017 02:09 PM

Google

-- Google first, search forums second, ask questions later.

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metroplexchl

66 posts in 141 days


#7 posted 08-06-2017 01:38 AM



Google

- mike02130

i tried putting the OP in google and no one answered. :-)

SO I thought I’d try asking a real people who more likely had actual experience in this area instead of sifting through the mountain of mis-information trying to decipher what was accurate.

Thanks for the helpful reply though!

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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mike02130

167 posts in 510 days


#8 posted 08-06-2017 02:07 AM

I’m guessing you still didn’t Google? Try “bowl carving”. Top of the list is David Fisher. No “mountain”. Just cuz I say it, doesn’t mean others don’t think it. Figure it out is some damn good advice.

-- Google first, search forums second, ask questions later.

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metroplexchl

66 posts in 141 days


#9 posted 08-06-2017 02:20 AM

Fair point. I wonder how someone would learn something they don’t know anything about? Answer = ask those that do. Maybe instead of “google”, you could have led with “try bowl carving. Top of the list is David Fisher.”

I couldn’t care less what others are thinking. Just trying to learn. I hope this forum isn’t one of those unwelcoming places where people can’t ask questions from practiced amateurs and professionals.

“Figuring it out” is what this forum is for. People that suggest google holds all the answers are the same people that say, “Where did you hear that? The internet?!!! You should have asked someone that actually knows what they’re talking about!”

night all,

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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Wildwood

2186 posts in 1972 days


#10 posted 08-06-2017 12:49 PM

Never heard of David Fisher, mostly turn wood so looked him up he has a great web site with lots of info.

http://www.davidffisher.com/the_process

While have watch demo of this being done before really enjoyed his video and no sandpaper used. Wish could get an off the tool finish with my wood turned bowls.

http://www.davidffisher.com/video_from_log_to_wooden_bowl

metrophexchl, moisture content of newly felled tree can vary with the seasons. Talking about sap running and sap not runnig unless have very expensive moisture meter will not even get a ball park reading. Still have to end seal to prevent end checking or start carving right away and take the risk of splitting. End sealing slows down the drying/shrinking process a little but won’t stop it. Logs will lose moisture from end of logs much faster than thru sides that is why end sealing is important. Wood dries from the outside in basically from evaporation.

Splitting a log and removingg the pith helps dry logs little faster because reducing amount of wood needing drying.

Three ways hobbist can measure moisture content are by feel, weighing on a scale or moisture meter.

If you take on this challenge wish you good luck!

-- Bill

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metroplexchl

66 posts in 141 days


#11 posted 08-06-2017 06:44 PM



Never heard of David Fisher, mostly turn wood so looked him up he has a great web site with lots of info.

http://www.davidffisher.com/the_process

While have watch demo of this being done before really enjoyed his video and no sandpaper used. Wish could get an off the tool finish with my wood turned bowls.

http://www.davidffisher.com/video_from_log_to_wooden_bowl

metrophexchl, moisture content of newly felled tree can vary with the seasons. Talking about sap running and sap not runnig unless have very expensive moisture meter will not even get a ball park reading. Still have to end seal to prevent end checking or start carving right away and take the risk of splitting. End sealing slows down the drying/shrinking process a little but won’t stop it. Logs will lose moisture from end of logs much faster than thru sides that is why end sealing is important. Wood dries from the outside in basically from evaporation.

Splitting a log and removingg the pith helps dry logs little faster because reducing amount of wood needing drying.

Three ways hobbist can measure moisture content are by feel, weighing on a scale or moisture meter.

If you take on this challenge wish you good luck!

- Wildwood

Wow. great info. I never would have imagined that there was enough moisture n wood that you could actually weigh it to determine differences in moisture content. Look forward to checking out those websites.

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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Wildwood

2186 posts in 1972 days


#12 posted 08-06-2017 07:57 PM

People use anything from bathroom scales to kitchen and postal scales to weigh wood. When wood stops gaining and losing moisture said to be at EMC or equilibrium moisture content with its environment.

So rough carving when it’s wet or green makes life easier, but have to wait for rough carved blank to reach EMC is for final carving.

Like posted earlier most moisture meters useless on freshly felled tree due to high moisture content but okay after log reaches fiber stautration point (FSP) or about 28 to 30 % MC for ball park readings.

Like lot of wood turners and guess carvers going by feeing the weight of a blank is good enough. That’s what I still do even though have a MM now.

Just remember sap and heart wood moisture content can and does differ when planning carving you bowl. Loren kind of hit upon outside layers of wood (sap wood) dry faster than inner wood (heart wood) and of course this can vary by species and hard or soft wood. Has a lot to with wood dimensional stability or thing that cause cracking, splitting or bowl going oval. There are technical terms use to describe all this but that hard to explain.

-- Bill

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metroplexchl

66 posts in 141 days


#13 posted 08-06-2017 09:45 PM



People use anything from bathroom scales to kitchen and postal scales to weigh wood. When wood stops gaining and losing moisture said to be at EMC or equilibrium moisture content with its environment.

So rough carving when it’s wet or green makes life easier, but have to wait for rough carved blank to reach EMC is for final carving.

Like posted earlier most moisture meters useless on freshly felled tree due to high moisture content but okay after log reaches fiber stautration point (FSP) or about 28 to 30 % MC for ball park readings.

Like lot of wood turners and guess carvers going by feeing the weight of a blank is good enough. That’s what I still do even though have a MM now.

Just remember sap and heart wood moisture content can and does differ when planning carving you bowl. Loren kind of hit upon outside layers of wood (sap wood) dry faster than inner wood (heart wood) and of course this can vary by species and hard or soft wood. Has a lot to with wood dimensional stability or thing that cause cracking, splitting or bowl going oval. There are technical terms use to describe all this but that hard to explain.

- Wildwood

Wow again. Thank you. I’ll start the rough carving and then let them dry until the reach EMC!

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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