LumberJocks

a crack filled with epoxy suddenly opens up on the day of delivery

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by shoichi posted 08-04-2017 10:30 PM 7079 views 1 time favorited 70 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View shoichi's profile

shoichi

30 posts in 700 days


08-04-2017 10:30 PM

so on the day of delivery of my very first table for which i was gonna get paid, one of the 4 original cracks that i filled with 5 min epoxy, had cracked open.

the guy i bought the slabs from says his slabs were properly dried when he sold them to me.

I can’t make the table any shorter cause the order is for a 10 feet table so removing the cracked area is not an option.also the client prefers not to have bow ties on the table hence me not using them in the first place…

the only thing i can think of is to put two-three bow ties on the unnderside of the table on each of the 4 cracks that i have filled with epoxy. Hopefully this will prevent the cracks from opening and expanding.

is this a sound strategy? this is the best that comes to my rookie mind at this point.

id appreciate any feedback

in the photos below, the red lines are the 4 cracks that i filled. the one that opened is the one bottom left.


70 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1177 posts in 1635 days


#1 posted 08-04-2017 11:20 PM

How is the table fastened to the base did you allow for a good amount of expansion?
Is if isn’t attached I would consider routing out the epoxy and refilling this is your chance to excercise your artistry.

-- Aj

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

613 posts in 746 days


#2 posted 08-04-2017 11:21 PM

Damn, Murphy’s Law. I guess it’s better than having the client call you the next day and giving you the bad news.

I imagine that the bowties under the table approach would be a good strategy. My guess is that the deeper they’re embedded, the better long term hold they’ll provide.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View jonah's profile

jonah

1467 posts in 3136 days


#3 posted 08-04-2017 11:38 PM

I’d put the bowties on the top, honestly. It’ll make it look more handmade!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7779 posts in 2635 days


#4 posted 08-04-2017 11:48 PM

First of all 5 minute epoxy is not usually the best epoxy for bonding especially high stress joints.

Second, it seems unlikely that your “filling” job penetrated all the way through to truly glue the sides of the crack together. If they had been truly glued, the crack would be in the wood beside the old glued crack.

Thirdly, this seems entirely predictable to me and I would not be surprised to see the others open up in time as well.

Did you check the moisture content yourself or just take the word of the seller?

I don’t mean to be negative but I am just not surprised …. and what’s worse, I don’t have a magic bullet.
Sorry.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

150 posts in 2082 days


#5 posted 08-04-2017 11:58 PM

If the client doesn’t want bowties on the top you don’t use bowties.
I agree with Paul, 5 min epoxy is not good for that situation…

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

1981 posts in 427 days


#6 posted 08-04-2017 11:59 PM

Since it’s already finished, refilling and sanding isn’t a good option, so I’d recommend a hard fill burn-in. It’ll be easy since the color in there doesn’t match the table to begin with.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View RangerJay's profile

RangerJay

7 posts in 160 days


#7 posted 08-05-2017 12:10 AM

This is not my area of strength so please consider these as just ideas – not advice that comes from a knowledge base of experience ….

That is a big table made up with what looks like just two long wide boards cut to mirror each other. Seems to me those big knots and the swirly grain around them, despite their beauty, are not your friend – they may look good but they also set the piece up for uneven stresses and subsequent movement over time whenever they are facing humidity changes.

Not at all sure this would work but maybe go with the idea of incorporating the look of bow-ties through the piece including the top. Might also consider ripping the entire top down the length of each of the cracks, flipping the pieces, and regluing. Also, when finishing – make sure the ends, and bottom, are as well sealed and finished as the top surface – the intent being to slow down, and even out, its response to rapid humidity changes.

I feel your frustration – looks like you have a gorgeous finish on a beautiful table – sure hope you are able to deal with this issue and salvage a terrific looking project.

Jay

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8317 posts in 1324 days


#8 posted 08-05-2017 12:21 AM

The longer the set time the stronger it will generally be. Generally.

A shot of epoxy as deep as possible in the cracks. Blue tape on the top side to keep the epoxy from spreading. Clamp it. Deep bow ties in the bottom on each crack.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1857 posts in 737 days


#9 posted 08-05-2017 12:28 AM

I wouldn’t do bow ties in the bottom. I would use counter top connectors sunk about half way in.
Clean out the cracks the best you can and refill them with epoxy resin.
West Systems seems to be the product of choice here.

Then cross your fingers and hope for the best!

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View pontic's profile

pontic

503 posts in 446 days


#10 posted 08-05-2017 12:56 AM

+1 on west systems.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

6004 posts in 2036 days


#11 posted 08-05-2017 01:09 AM

+2 on west. And for future reference, when filling – lay down some neat epoxy first, before using any with color or fillers. It lets it penetrate the wood better and provides a better bond.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

1981 posts in 427 days


#12 posted 08-05-2017 01:32 AM

Those epoxy suggestions are all good for use in the future, but in order to use them now, it’ll require sanding them flush to the surface. Since the top is already finished that presents a difficult situation. Sanding and refinishing just those areas while blending the repair into the existing finish is a real challenge, so short of sanding and refinishing the entire table top, a spot repair is the way to go.

That’s where the hard fill burn-in sticks come in. It’s easy to just fill those spots, and get them perfectly level. Like I said, color isn’t an issue since you’re not trying to match a wood surface. Also a shellac-based stick like Mohawk EZ-Flow is durable enough for the wear and tear a table top will see. Mohawk Planestick is another good option as it has low sheen and is both durable and flexible.

Those cracks should have been stabilized mechanically, and the type of epoxy everyone is recommending used in the first place.

I recommend repairing it and delivering the table. You have no way of knowing which way the wood will move in its new environment. Possibly it will be stable, but if it opens up, do another spot repair. Eventually it will stabilize.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View shoichi's profile

shoichi

30 posts in 700 days


#13 posted 08-05-2017 02:23 PM




First of all 5 minute epoxy is not usually the best epoxy for bonding especially high stress joints.

Second, it seems unlikely that your “filling” job penetrated all the way through to truly glue the sides of the crack together. If they had been truly glued, the crack would be in the wood beside the old glued crack.

Thirdly, this seems entirely predictable to me and I would not be surprised to see the others open up in time as well.

Did you check the moisture content yourself or just take the word of the seller?
I don t mean to be negative but I am just not surprised …. and what s worse, I don t have a magic bullet.
Sorry.
- shipwright

i am treating this as a major learning experience. i didn’t check the moisture content myself and just trusted the seller which i will never do again.

i am gonna be proactive and put 1.5 inch thick bowties in the bottom side of the table on all 4 cracks that were fixed with epoxy. this way hopefully the other 3 cracks won’t open later on.

View shoichi's profile

shoichi

30 posts in 700 days


#14 posted 08-05-2017 02:26 PM



Since it s already finished, refilling and sanding isn t a good option, so I d recommend a hard fill burn-in. It ll be easy since the color in there doesn t match the table to begin with.

- RichTaylor

thanks RichTaylor. I’ll look that up..

View Carloz's profile (online now)

Carloz

977 posts in 429 days


#15 posted 08-05-2017 09:38 PM


the guy i bought the slabs from says his slabs were properly dried when he sold them to me.
- shoichi

Can you imagine a situation where a seller would say : ” These slabs were not dried properly” ? In my not so short life I only a couple of times came across a guy who would be honest selling something and pointed to some hidden defect.
Now back to the table. Can you post a photo of the underside of the table especially at the place the top is attached? Something tells me the problem is there.

showing 1 through 15 of 70 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com